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Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Morsheda Parvin, Ahmad Fauzi Bin Mohd Ayub, Romana Kader and Md. Mahfuzur Rahman

An old saying –“Jack of all trades, master of none”– deliberately asserts that the purpose of a master’s degree program is to generate high level job skills in order to…

Abstract

Purpose

An old saying –“Jack of all trades, master of none”– deliberately asserts that the purpose of a master’s degree program is to generate high level job skills in order to improve a nation's economy, while a bachelor degree produces economically productive graduates. Employment of such graduates is fundamentally important for personal and economic development. There is a link between a bachelor’s and master's degree and how these qualifications are linked to the job market. Both horizontal and vertical mismatches are developed which is the central focus of this research.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research bears the norms of the qualitative method. Both secondary and primary data are used, and meanwhile secondary data are collected by the banks, Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS), University Grants Commission (UGC) and by the institutions sampled. Primary data are gathered from interviews with key people. Data were collected from three institutions of higher education and from six commercial banks and from the Central Bank. The academic results of 21,325 MBA graduates and education backgrounds of 750 executives working in banks served as the basis for establishing our arguments.

Findings

This study discovers that MBA graduates who have studied science subjects achieved much better grades in the MBA compared to their counterparts who studied business from secondary provision to first degree. The market-driven MBA programme has become a “business product”. The major revenue of higher education institutions comes from enrolment in MBA courses. For this reason, a science-friendly MBA program is developed to generate more business. If this continues, the philosophy of the master's program would either be lost or will have to be redefined in the 21st century.

Originality/value

While a few studies have investigated the area of HE in Bangladesh, none covers the impact of MBA degrees on the job market and its contribution to enhancing job skills.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 September 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam and Samsilah Roslan

Education system supplies the required manpower in order to ensure the national prosperity. A salient link between education and business sector is a prerequisite to cater…

Abstract

Purpose

Education system supplies the required manpower in order to ensure the national prosperity. A salient link between education and business sector is a prerequisite to cater economically productive manpower. Economic and social development supplements each other that can only be ensured via a functional education system. A dysfunction education system created by a biased clustering policy develops a greater horizontal and vertical mismatch with the job market in many developing nations. This mismatch dents the quality of business management that halts the national prosperity. Therefore, the role of education has become questionable. This research aims to bridge between education and business sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research bears the norms of qualitative method. Both secondary and primary data are used. While, secondary data are collected by the banks, Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS) and by the University Grants Commission (UGC), primary data are collected through interviews. Document review and data collected through personal communication with members of staff of sampled banks and institutes of HE also supplements. Data were collected from six commercial banks and from the Central Bank.

Findings

Findings suggest that clustering system favours science graduates by depriving business counterpart, which creates an atmosphere of educational disparity. This disparity affects the symbiotic and reciprocal relationship that exists amongst different provisions (i.e. secondaryand tertiary) of education. Favoured clustering system further contributes for a larger “horizontal educational mismatch” with job market. Therefore, science graduates occupy the places in the banks where business graduates should ideally be employed. Being a dysfunction system, education fails to support substantially for social and economic developments.

Originality/value

A few studies are conducted in the area of HE in Bangladesh but none covers the issue of impact of clustering system of education in secondary provision on HE and job market. Graduates' performance in carrying out the jobs is seen as the most important element for the business management. This study has suggested a unique way forward which would be able to reduce the mismatch between education system and job market, enabling a substantial business management process. Considering this, the paper is first on its kind.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Morsheda Parvin and Samsilah Roslan

Universally, university is considered as the apex body which is ethically obliged to present a substantial society. In doing so, universities often innovate dynamic…

Abstract

Purpose

Universally, university is considered as the apex body which is ethically obliged to present a substantial society. In doing so, universities often innovate dynamic business models and theories. Ideally, the countries whose universities contribute for better and sustainable business growth are the advanced one. However, universities themselves should be the business organisation – an argument is yet to receive attention. Although literature lacks in the area of education business especially university provision, the sector behaves as business entity after the inception of private sector. Therefore, this paper aims to explore the paradigm transformation of university sector and its impact on the society.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research adopts the norms of qualitative methods. Both secondary and primary data are used. While secondary data are collected by University Grants Commission (UGC), primary data are collected through interviews.

Findings

Findings show that the development of university sector started following monopoly model. More than half a century, the same model was continued. Thereafter, duopoly model was introduced which carried until the inception of private sector. The growth of private sector followed oligopoly model which was further extended to small and medium enterprises (SMEs). These days, society compares university with “diploma mill”, as production of knowledge and civic society is longer than the part of the core business of university. Consequently, compromising with research is to be judged as a threat to overall development that includes business and social development.

Originality/value

A few studies have been published in the area of private university. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, none covers the oligopoly-ism and SME-ism behaviour of university and its impact on the concept of university and on the society. Therefore, this project aims to understand the norms of university business and its substantial contribution on the social change.

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Gazi Mahabubul Alam and Tajularipin Sulaiman

Food security for students is very important if they are to achieve both quantitative and qualitative success in their education and later career. Consequently, “food for…

Abstract

Purpose

Food security for students is very important if they are to achieve both quantitative and qualitative success in their education and later career. Consequently, “food for education (FFE)” intervention is provided for poorer students who are in primary school in many developing countries. This has helped to achieve the objective of universal education. In absence of a food security programme from the secondary provision, students from poorer families are forced to discontinue their education. For this reason, the success of FFE intervention has been criticised as unsustainable. This paper aims to explore a food security model that can lead to the sustainable development of education in developing nations.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study collected primary data from students who were being educated in Bangladesh and receiving “FFE” intervention. In total, 576 respondents (equal number of boys and girls) were selected from six schools located in urban and rural areas. Secondary data were accessed from the archives of the Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS) and the World Bank. The paper adopts a descriptive analysis method for primary and secondary sources to report the findings.

Findings

Free schooling supported by “FFE” intervention is the key to achieving education for all (EFA) targets. Since its inception, 93% of students who received an FFE intervention have at least completed their primary school education. The success of FFE has encouraged the government to provide a massive intervention strategy which began in 2011. This helped to achieve the EFA target. Despite this success and while nearly 18% of FFE-intervened graduates have completed their secondary education, none went to higher secondary school, let alone tertiary level. The lack of food security was the main reason for youths not continuing with their further education.

Originality/value

The “FFE” programme may work well for children who are being educated since they do not shoulder any family responsibility. In reality, teenagers and adults in emerging nations should devote themselves to ensuring there is enough food for their families. This research presents a new policy option, labelled as “education for food (EFF)”, in order to retain this group in the education system. Being an advocacy model, this may trigger a discourse on how to create a balanced society where both hunger and education are taken care of and problems are solved.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Morsheda Parvin and Md. Mahfuzur Rahman

Criteria of skills and their schemata have evolved out of historical social practices. Interpretation of social events is guided and constrained by the prevailing…

Abstract

Purpose

Criteria of skills and their schemata have evolved out of historical social practices. Interpretation of social events is guided and constrained by the prevailing rationality which itself reflects the dominant constellation of power. Hence, some argued that informal provision of skills delivery is the base of business growth. Upon the success of informal provision, institutional counterpart unethically grabs the market, kicking off the earlier. Evidences arguably confirmed that the institutional provision of skills delivery contributes to rapid business growth. Business growth is indeed important but not at the cost of exploitation of ethics which is the central focus of this study.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research adopts the norms of qualitative methods. Both secondary and primary data are used. While secondary data are collected through document reviews, primary data are collected via interviews. In total, 12 industries are sampled and equally distributed into two sectors (manufacturing and services).

Findings

Findings show that the professional positions in the manufacturing industries at their inception phase were occupied by non-university graduates who received neither informal trainings nor on-the-job trainings. Over the time, university graduates started capturing the market. This has forced the non-university graduates to accrue a diploma from the universities in order to retain. Those who failed to obtain a university diploma are compelled to leave the sector. In fact, professional positions in service industries at the inception phase were mainly occupied by the university graduates who did not study the relevant subjects from the universities but received training from the informal provision. Later, universities started offering these programmes.

Originality/value

A few studies have been published in the area of manufacturing industries especially on garments sector. None covers the paradigm transformation of skills (human capital theory) in garments. The authors also failed to locate a comparative study that maps the contribution of different provisions of skills providers and their paradigm transformations occurred within manufacturing and service industries. Therefore, this project explores the contribution of informal and institutional provisions of skills delivery for the inception and growth of industries by comparing between manufacturing and service industries.

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Article
Publication date: 28 February 2020

Gazi Mahabubul Alam and Md. Abdur Rahman Forhad

Diploma Engineers (DE) mainly receive practical and skills-oriented education and training in the area of technical and vocational subjects from the polytechnic system…

Abstract

Purpose

Diploma Engineers (DE) mainly receive practical and skills-oriented education and training in the area of technical and vocational subjects from the polytechnic system. Globally, universities have limited DEs access to Higher Education (HE). Over the course of time, many countries have changed this situation, putting into place a decent qualification and policy framework that ensures higher education for deserving candidates. Lately, Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) received special priority in developing countries, and Bangladesh is no exception to it, resulting in a massive growth of DE. This study, the first of its kind, examines the impact of this growth with a key focus on the inclusion of diploma engineers into higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the differentiated nature of research questions, multiple techniques are used to collect the data. However, this research uses the qualitative method. Both secondary and primary data are used. While secondary data are collected by the Bangladesh Bureau of Educational Information and Statistics (BANBEIS), primary data are collected through interviews. With standard sets of admission questions, tests are conducted with two groups of students to draw a comparison.

Findings

The number of students studying at polytechnic institutes is increasing dramatically. The growth of public polytechnic institutes remains steady. Public counterparts respond to the demand by operating both day and night shifts. Many private polytechnics are also established. The size and infrastructure of private Polytechnics are relatively insignificant. However, the mushrooming private sector covers the increased demand. The curve of DE has been increased radically with a questionable competency by the contribution of both public and private polytechnics. Only one public university provides higher education to these DE.

Originality/value

A few reports have been published in the area of TVET by the development partners and the Government of Bangladesh. Only one journal article is published exploring the role of TVET on national development in Bangladesh. However, none cover the issue of access to university education for DE graduates.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2019

Gazi Mahabubul Alam

Commitment of governments and development partners in achieving both qualitative and quantitative measurements for primary and secondary provisions is the key reason for…

Abstract

Purpose

Commitment of governments and development partners in achieving both qualitative and quantitative measurements for primary and secondary provisions is the key reason for the development of private higher education (HE) and its rapid expansion in the developing world. A considerable amount of attention towards primary and secondary provisions has produced a large numbers of graduates who are theoretically qualified, but have questionable competences in meeting the needs of the market. This has a significant impact on the quality of HE which is delivered by private and public provisions. The purpose of this paper is to examine quality assurance (QA) mechanism set-up for the private HE sector in Bangladesh.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative methods were used because interviewees can express their views in a candid way, with a primary focus on the desired themes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with personnel from the Ministry of Education, the University Grants Commission, students, staff and management from public and private universities. Documents review and secondary data also supplemented.

Findings

The mechanism set-up for QA is yet to mature. Formal arrangements for the governance and regulatory control of private HE provision in Bangladesh are neither sufficient nor up-to-date to help the sector function effectively. The current rules and regulations are suitable only for public HE, but not for the private sector HE.

Originality/value

A number of studies have been conducted in the area of private HE in Bangladesh. Only one of them covers QA, and none covers the impact of governance on QA. In the light of this background, this paper is the first of its kind.

Details

International Journal of Comparative Education and Development, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2396-7404

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Walter Leal Filho, Maria Alzira Pimenta Dinis, Subarna Sivapalan, Halima Begum, Theam Foo Ng, Abul Quasem Al-Amin, Gazi Mahabubul Alam, Ayyoob Sharifi, Amanda Lange Salvia, Qudsia Kalsoom, Mustafa Saroar and Samara Neiva

It is still unclear how Asian universities incorporate the theory or practice of sustainable development (SD) in their research and education programmes. To address this…

Abstract

Purpose

It is still unclear how Asian universities incorporate the theory or practice of sustainable development (SD) in their research and education programmes. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to report on a study that has examined how universities in Asian countries handle and address matters related to SD.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a bibliometric analysis and an online survey-method. The online survey data were analysed through descriptive analysis and one-sample student’s t-test.

Findings

The study indicates that there is considerable variation among the Asian countries regarding sustainability practices in higher education institutions (HEIs). The HEIs in far eastern countries, such as Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand are perceived to demonstrate more sustainability practices.

Research limitations/implications

Even though a substantial number of participants participated in the survey, it did not cover all Asian countries. The online survey was carried out over a limited period of time, and not all HEIs in the field may have received information about the study.

Practical implications

Asia is the largest continent facing a number of sustainability challenges. In this context, the contribution of HEIs is very important. The findings of the current study may serve as a baseline for Asian HEIs to take more initiatives towards SD goals, as HEIs are responsible for the education and training of hundreds of thousands of students who will be occupying key positions in industry, government or education in the coming years.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature in two distinct ways. First, it was possible to develop a comprehensive instrument to measure sustainability practices in HEIs. Second, this study has filled the gap of the scarcity of studies regarding sustainability practices in HEIs in Asia.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2022

Paolo Pietro Biancone, Valerio Brescia, Federico Lanzalonga and Gazi Mahabubul Alam

This paper aims to explore the literature on vertical farming to define key elements to outline a business model for entrepreneurs. The research aims to stimulate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the literature on vertical farming to define key elements to outline a business model for entrepreneurs. The research aims to stimulate entrepreneurship for vertical farming in a smart cities' context, recognising urban agriculture as technology to satisfy increasing food needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research conducts a structured literature review on 186 articles on vertical farming extracted from the Scopus. Moreover, the bibliometric analysis revealed the descriptive statistics on this field and the main themes through the authors' keywords.

Findings

Different perspectives showed the multidisciplinary nature of the topic and how the intersection of different skills is necessary to understand the subject entirely. The keywords analysis allowed for identifying the topics covered by the authors and the business model's elements.

Research limitations/implications

The research explores a topic in the embryonic stage to define key strands of literature. It provides business model insights extending George and Bock's (2011) research to stimulate entrepreneurship in vertical farming. Limitations arise from the sources used to develop our analysis and how the topic appears as a frontier innovation.

Originality/value

Originality is the integration of literature strands related to vertical farming, highlighting its multidisciplinary nature to provide a holistic understanding of the themes. In smart cities' context, innovations allow traditional business models to be interpreted in a novel perspective and revealed the elements for transforming vertical farming from innovative technology to an effective source of food sustenance. Finally, the paper suggests a new methodology application for the analysis of word clusters by integrating correspondence analysis and multidimensional scaling analysis.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2021

Shafique Ur Rehman, Stefano Bresciani, Khurram Ashfaq and Gazi Mahabubul Alam

This study aims to examine the influence of intellectual capital and knowledge management on competitive advantage with the mediation role of innovativeness in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the influence of intellectual capital and knowledge management on competitive advantage with the mediation role of innovativeness in the Pakistan manufacturing industry. Moreover, differentiation strategy is used as a moderator between innovativeness and competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected from 387 manufacturing firms in Pakistan through questionnaires. Purposive random sampling was used to collect data. The partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) method is used to test the proposed hypotheses. This study followed multiple regression analyses to see the influence of intellectual capital, knowledge management, innovativeness and differentiation strategy on competitive advantage.

Findings

The results elucidate that intellectual capital and knowledge management significantly determines innovativeness and competitive advantage. Moreover, innovativeness significantly mediates between intellectual capital, knowledge management and competitive advantage. Besides, innovativeness significantly determines competitive advantage. Business strategies significantly lead to competitive advantage. Finally, business strategies significantly moderate between innovativeness and competitive advantage.

Practical implications

The research highlight an important issue that how manufacturing sector management uses intellectual capital, knowledge management, innovativeness and business strategies in determining competitive advantage. Besides, it covers the gap and assists the management of the manufacturing sector to focus on exogenous constructs to examine competitive advantage.

Originality/value

This study adds value to the body of knowledge by focusing on predictors that impact competitive advantage. This initial study determines intellectual capital and knowledge management influence on competitive advantage and innovativeness as a mediator by using resource orchestration theory. Moreover, differentiation strategy is used as moderating variable between innovativeness and competitive advantage. The managers, students and researchers can obtain benefits from this study.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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