Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Ariel Sanders, Barbara J. Phillips and David E. Williams

The relationship between musicians and the music industry has often been depicted as a dichotomy between creativity and commerce with musicians conflicted between their…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between musicians and the music industry has often been depicted as a dichotomy between creativity and commerce with musicians conflicted between their roles as artists and their roles as marketers of sound. Recently, marketing researchers have problematized this dichotomy and suggested musicians perceive these roles as inevitable and indivisible. However, the processes of how musicians market their sound to the industry gatekeepers remain unclear. This study seeks to find the key industry gatekeepers for musicians and how musicians sell their personal sound to them.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an interpretative phenomenological approach, ten interviews with professional musicians across different music genres provided insight into the strategies musicians use to market their sound to industry gatekeepers.

Findings

In total, three key gatekeepers and the five strategies that musicians use to sell their sound are identified. The gatekeepers are record labels, other musicians and consumers. Musicians sell their sound to these gatekeepers through the externally directed strategies of using social media to build relationships, defining their personal sound through genre and creating a unique sound, and through the internally directed strategies of keeping motivated through sound evolution and counting on luck.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are limited by the small number of musicians interviewed and the heterogeneous representation of music genres.

Originality/value

The study contributes to theoretical understandings of how musicians as cultural producers market their sound in a commercial industry.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 April 2020

Reijo Savolainen

This study aims to elaborate the picture of the relationships between information and power by examining how expert power appears in the characterizations of gatekeeping…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to elaborate the picture of the relationships between information and power by examining how expert power appears in the characterizations of gatekeeping presented in the research literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses conceptual analysis for examining how expert power is constitutive of the construct of gatekeeper and how people subject to the influence of gatekeeping trust or challenge the expert power attributed to gatekeepers. The study draws on the analysis of 40 key studies on the above issues.

Findings

Researchers have mainly constructed the gatekeepers' expert power in terms of superior knowledge and skills applicable to a specific domain, coupled with an ability to control or facilitate access to information. The gatekeeper's expert power has been approached as a contextual factor that facilitates rather than controls access to information. The power relationships between the gatekeepers and those subject to gatekeeping vary contextually, depending on the extent to which the latter have access to alternative sources of information. The findings highlight the need to elaborate the construct of gatekeeping by rethinking its relevance in the networked information environments where the traditional picture of gatekeepers controlling access to information sources is eroding.

Research limitations/implications

As the study focuses on how expert power figures in gatekeeping, no attention is devoted to the role of social power of other types, for example, reward power and referent power.

Originality/value

The study pioneers by providing an in-depth analysis of the nature of expert power as a constituent of gatekeeping.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Antonio Messeni Petruzzelli

The paper aims to investigate how proximity dimensions affect the establishment of different knowledge relationships between gatekeepers and other economic actors involved

Downloads
1359

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to investigate how proximity dimensions affect the establishment of different knowledge relationships between gatekeepers and other economic actors involved in their knowledge‐based networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology is based on an inductive research approach, represented by the explorative case study of the Polytechnic University of Turin. The University's knowledge relationships are identified and distinguished through the analysis of its patent joint‐developments, citations, and R&D projects. Then, for each knowledge relationship, geographical, organizational, and technological proximity between the University and the other economic actors are assessed, adopting suitable proxies.

Findings

The data reveal that the University activates collaborative and exploitative relationships with actors characterized by geographical, organizational, and technological proximity. In contrast, collaborative and explorative relationships seem to require actors characterized by more distant technological competencies. Furthermore, the exchange of knowledge by means of non‐collaborative relationships occurs between the University and actors characterized only by technological proximity.

Research limitations/implications

On the basis of this analysis, actors can identify which proximity dimensions assume an important role for activating knowledge flows with gatekeepers. Regarding policy implications, the paper highlights how policy makers should leverage proximities in order to favour and support the exchange of knowledge, hence improving the innovative capability, competitiveness, and attractiveness of regional areas.

Originality/value

This research contributes to shed further light on the nature of the relationships and knowledge flows exchanged by the gatekeepers. In particular, it analyzes how relational attributes can affect the knowledge transfer processes between economic actors.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Natali Helberger, Katharina Kleinen-von Königslöw and Rob van der Noll

The purposes of this paper are to deal with the questions: because search engines, social networks and app-stores are often referred to as gatekeepers to diverse…

Downloads
2029

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this paper are to deal with the questions: because search engines, social networks and app-stores are often referred to as gatekeepers to diverse information access, what is the evidence to substantiate these gatekeeper concerns, and to what extent are existing regulatory solutions to control gatekeeper control suitable at all to address new diversity concerns? It will also map the different gatekeeper concerns about media diversity as evidenced in existing research before the background of network gatekeeping theory critically analyses some of the currently discussed regulatory approaches and develops the contours of a more user-centric approach towards approaching gatekeeper control and media diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual research work based on desk research into the relevant and communications science, economic and legal academic literature and the relevant laws and public policy documents. Based on the existing evidence as well as on applying the insights from network gatekeeping theory, this paper then critically reviews the existing legal/policy discourse and identifies elements for an alternative approach.

Findings

This paper finds that when looking at search engines, social networks and app stores, many concerns about the influence of the new information intermediaries on media diversity have not so much their source in the control over critical resources or access to information, as the traditional gatekeepers do. Instead, the real bottleneck is access to the user, and the way the relationship between social network, search engine or app platforms and users is given form. Based on this observation, the paper concludes that regulatory initiatives in this area would need to pay more attention to the dynamic relationship between gatekeeper and gated.

Research limitations/implications

Because this is a conceptual piece based on desk-research, meaning that our assumptions and conclusions have not been validated by own empirical research. Also, although the authors have conducted to their best knowledge the literature review as broad and as concise as possible, seeing the breadth of the issue and the diversity of research outlets, it cannot be excluded that we have overlooked one or the other publication.

Practical implications

This paper makes a number of very concrete suggestions of how to approach potential challenges from the new information intermediaries to media diversity.

Social implications

The societal implications of search engines, social networks and app stores for media diversity cannot be overestimated. And yet, it is the position of users, and their exposure to diverse information that is often neglected in the current dialogue. By drawing attention to the dynamic relationship between gatekeeper and gated, this paper highlights the importance of this relationship for diverse exposure to information.

Originality/value

While there is currently much discussion about the possible challenges from search engines, social networks and app-stores for media diversity, a comprehensive overview in the scholarly literature on the evidence that actually exists is still lacking. And while most of the regulatory solutions still depart from a more pre-networked, static understanding of “gatekeeper”, we develop our analysis on the basis for a more dynamic approach that takes into account the fluid and interactive relationship between the roles of “gatekeepers” and “gated”. Seen from this perspective, the regulatory solutions discussed so far appear in a very different light.

Details

info, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Jeanette Shepherd and Kitty van Vuuren

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an original research project that explored the experiences and actions of immigrant and refugee communities during…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the results of an original research project that explored the experiences and actions of immigrant and refugee communities during the 2011 Brisbane flood. It specifically examines the role of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) community leaders who acted as “gatekeepers” in communicating emergency responses to the disaster to their communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight “gatekeepers” who met the study's selection criteria.

Findings

The study found that the characteristics and demographics of CALD gatekeepers in Brisbane, their use of multiple sources related to their involvement in the community, their use of interpersonal sources for information-seeking and use of the mass media, is largely consistent with previous studies.

Research limitations/implications

This study departed from previous research with respect to issues of trust in government sources, gender and warning confirmation behaviour. These differences affected the behaviour of the CALD gatekeepers, especially around risk perception, information dissemination and filtering. Although the study points to the potential challenges facing emergency management services in fully incorporating the needs of all CALD communities, implications are limited given the small number of gatekeepers who agreed to be interviewed.

Practical implications

Despite its limitation, the study does indicate that a critical gap exists in understanding CALD community responses to natural disasters.

Social implications

The paper concludes with suggestions for a research agenda to gain better knowledge of the ethnic, demographic and personal factors that influence gatekeeping behaviour.

Originality/value

The study is original because no prior research has directed attention to Brisbane's CALD community responses to disasters.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Aurore Haas

– This paper aims to contribute to defining the concepts of boundary spanner, gatekeeper and knowledge broker.

Downloads
2411

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to defining the concepts of boundary spanner, gatekeeper and knowledge broker.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature covering more than 100 sources.

Findings

A review of past research leads to proposing a set of new definitions and also to the detection of six research avenues.

Originality/value

The ability of organizations to recognize, source and integrate key information or knowledge is important for their strategy, innovation and performance over time. Three types of individuals have information gathering and knowledge dissemination roles at the frontier of organizations and groups: boundary spanners, gatekeepers and knowledge brokers. Although research on these individuals is well-developed, we found that in practice, the definitions of the concepts overlap and still need a clarification. So far, no systematic comparison of these roles has been undertaken.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Sanjeewa Pradeep Wijayaratne, Mike Reid, Kate Westberg, Anthony Worsley and Felix Mavondo

Food literacy is an emerging concept associated with the skills, capabilities and knowledge to prepare a healthy diet and make healthy food choices. This study aims to…

Downloads
2657

Abstract

Purpose

Food literacy is an emerging concept associated with the skills, capabilities and knowledge to prepare a healthy diet and make healthy food choices. This study aims to examine how a dietary gatekeeper’s intentions to prepare a healthy diet for their family, and the subsequent satisfaction that a healthy diet is achieved, is influenced by their food literacy and by barriers to healthy eating.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-stage cross-sectional study was undertaken with 756 dietary gatekeepers who completed a baseline (time 1) and a three-month follow-up (time 2) questionnaire. Partial least square-structural equation modeling was used to estimate relationships between gatekeeper food literacy, their demographic characteristics, socio-cognitive factors, time 1 satisfaction with the healthiness of the household diet and intention to provide a healthy family diet. The follow-up survey assessed subsequent satisfaction with the healthiness of the household diet and barriers to achieving it.

Findings

The results highlight the significance of the dietary gatekeeper’s food literacy in overcoming barriers to healthy eating and fostering increased satisfaction with the healthiness of the family diet. The research further highlights the influence of past satisfaction, attitude, subjective norms and perceived behavioural control. Several demographics factors are also highlighted as influential.

Research limitations/implications

The research offers new insights into the role of food literacy in the home environment including its influence on the dietary gatekeeper’s satisfaction with the family diet. The current model also provides strong evidence that food literacy can reduce the impact of barriers to healthy eating experienced by gatekeepers. The research has limitations associated with the socio-economic status of respondents and thus offers scope for research into different populations and their food literacy, younger and early formed cohabiting and the negotiation of food and dietary responsibility and on intergenerational food literacy.

Practical implications

The current findings regarding the impact of food literacy have significant implications for government agencies, non-profit agencies, educational institutions and other related stakeholders in their effort to curb obesity. Implications exist for micro-level programmes and actions designed to influence gatekeepers, family members and households and at the macro level for policies and programmes designed to influence the obesogenicity of the food environments.

Originality/value

The current study is one of the first to offer evidence on the role of food literacy in the home environment and its ability to overcome barriers to healthy eating. The research provides social marketers and public policymakers with novel insights regarding the need for increased food literacy and for developing interventions to improve food literacy in dietary gatekeepers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2010

Nicholas Berente, Danail Ivanov and Betty Vandenbosch

Process gatekeepers, individuals responsible for strictly enforcing data completeness at critical points within a process, are often used to encourage compliance with…

Downloads
1148

Abstract

Purpose

Process gatekeepers, individuals responsible for strictly enforcing data completeness at critical points within a process, are often used to encourage compliance with processes associated with enterprise systems. The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between process gatekeepers and process compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a mixed‐method approach of both qualitative and quantitative analyses of one firm's sales processes, the paper identifies and measures four key drivers of compliance with the work process: ease of use, perceived value, urgency, and gatekeeper flexibility.

Findings

The paper finds that process context‐specific, gatekeeper‐related factors directly affect an individual's willingness to work within the bounds of prescribed processes. In particular, the paper finds evidence that gatekeeper flexibility appears to encourage process compliance.

Research limitations/implications

These findings are limited in generalizability to a single organization, by potential instrument‐related biases, and by typical caveats associated with models derived from exploratory research.

Practical implications

Implications include the motivation of the need for overall process compliance in realizing the benefits of an enterprise information system, as well as the counterintuitive notion that gatekeeper flexibility may be positively related to process compliance.

Originality/value

This paper introduces the notion of process gatekeeper, devises a context‐specific measure of gatekeeper flexibility, and relates this notion to an overall model associated with process compliance in an enterprise system context.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 May 2019

Marc Kalina and Dianne Scott

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the author’s research experiences in northern Mozambique in order explore the multiplicity of gatekeeper relations that arose…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to reflect on the author’s research experiences in northern Mozambique in order explore the multiplicity of gatekeeper relations that arose while seeking to arrange access to both “the field” and respondents, as well as the impacts that these relationships had on the research process. Although this dynamic has been thoroughly described within methodological literature, there exists a tendency to presume research–gatekeeper relations as static; once established, there is little discussion on how the relationships develop or can be managed, once access has (or has not) been achieved.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws upon qualitative fieldwork conducted predominantly in rural communities in northern Mozambique. The study analysed the development of the Nacala Development Corridor programme and the N13 Highway Rehabilitation Project in northern Mozambique in order to examine the impacts of the development on local citizens and examine the relationship between citizen and state within development processes. Fieldwork consisted of three different phases of semi-structured and open-ended interviews with key stakeholders and affected persons, spanning five different interview schedules, and a total of 77 individual interviews and 27 community focus groups conducted along the N13.

Findings

The study found that duality of Mozambican governance which includes both local officials and traditional leadership contributed to a multiplicity of local gatekeepers which impacted the research process in a multitude of ways. As a result, researcher–gatekeeper relations were not static, but had to be managed throughout the duration of the study.

Originality/value

This discussion provides a more dynamic representation of the challenges involved with establishing and managing gatekeeper relations in rural, developing, and in particular, southern African, contexts, while offering cautious practical advice to researchers working within rural or southern African contexts.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 April 2016

Hongzhi Gao, Monica Ren, Jing Zhang and Ruoyi Sun

Small and medium-sized exporters (SMEs) are driven to develop a network entry strategy to tap into a new foreign market. The purpose of this paper is to draw on the…

Downloads
2142

Abstract

Purpose

Small and medium-sized exporters (SMEs) are driven to develop a network entry strategy to tap into a new foreign market. The purpose of this paper is to draw on the network perspective to evaluate how a network gatekeeper facilitates a foreign SME exporter’s entry into local business networks in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The single case study method was adopted. The Ule New Zealand Mall, an online shopping platform that sells New Zealand products in China, was selected in this case study. The authors applied the critical incident technique to evaluate the position of New Zealand Post (as a home country-based network gatekeeper), the roles within the position, and the key outcome of the network gatekeeping.

Findings

The study discovers two key roles of network gatekeepers: bridging the gap in trust between outsider networks and insider networks; and reducing the costs of experiential learning for SME exporters. Finally, this study concludes that the “brokered insidership” position acquired by SME exporters is the key outcome of network gatekeeping in foreign market entry.

Originality/value

This study advances the understanding of theories of structural holes, business network and gatekeeping. The authors articulate the critical position assumed by a network gatekeeper in bridging two otherwise disconnected business networks, and their key roles in networking. The study also proposes a new network concept – “brokered insidership”.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000