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Book part
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Michal Engelman and Leafia Zi Ye

Social and economic disparities between racial/ethnic groups are a feature of the American context into which immigrants are incorporated and a key determinant of…

Abstract

Social and economic disparities between racial/ethnic groups are a feature of the American context into which immigrants are incorporated and a key determinant of population health. We ask whether racial/ethnic disparities in diabetes vary by nativity and whether native-immigrant disparities in diabetes vary by race and over time in the United States. Using the 2000–2015 National Health Interview Survey, we estimate logistic regressions to examine the interaction of race/ethnicity, nativity, and duration in the US in shaping diabetes patterns. Relative to their native-born co-ethnics, foreign-born Asian adults experience a significant diabetes disadvantage, while foreign-born Hispanic, Black, and White adults experience a significant advantage. Adjusting for obesity, education, and other covariates eliminates the foreign-born advantage for Black and White adults, but it persists for Hispanic adults. The same adjustment accentuates the disadvantage for foreign-born Asian adults. For Black and Hispanic adults, the protective foreign-born effect erodes as duration in the US increases. For foreign-born Asian adults, the immigrant disadvantage appears to grow with duration in the US. Relative to native-born White adults, all non-white groups regardless of nativity see a diabetes disadvantage because the racial/ethnic disadvantage either countervails a foreign-born advantage or amplifies a foreign-born disadvantage. Racial/ethnic differentials in diabetes are considerable and are influenced by each group’s nativity composition. Obesity and (for the foreign-born) time in the US influence these disparities, but do not explain them. These findings underscore the importance of unmeasured, systemic determinants of health in America’s race-conscious society.

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Immigration and Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-062-4

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Mark Chandley, Maxine Cromar-Hayes, Dave Mercer, Bridget Clancy, Iain Wilkie and Gary Thorpe

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to derive from an on-going, innovative, project to explore the concept, and application, of “recovery” in the care and clinical management of patients detained in one UK high-security hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a qualitative, action research, methodology the aim was to involve forensic mental health nurses in a collaborative, client-centred approach to identification and resolution of dilemmas in the process of planning care for offender-patients.

Findings

In this context the authors identify constraints and contradictions involved in employing recovery principles in institutions critics refer to as part of the disciplinary apparatus of psychiatric and social control; where the taken for granted lives, and relations, of an incarcerated population are measured by the calendar, not the clock.

Research limitations/implications

Protective practices remain highly relevant in high-secure practice. Safety, an important value for all can by and large be achieved through recovery approaches. The humanistic elements of recovery can offer up safe and useful methods of deploying the mental health nurse on the ward. Many nurses have the prerequisite approach but there remains a wide scope to enhance those skills. Many see the approach as axiomatic though nurse education often prepares nurses with a biomedical view of the ward.

Practical implications

Currently, philosophical tenets of recovery are enshrined in contemporary health policy and professional directives but, as yet, have not been translated into high-secure settings. Drawing on preliminary findings, attention is given to the value of socially situated approaches in challenging historic dominance of a medical model.

Social implications

It is concluded that recovery could be a forerunner of reforms necessary for the continued relevance of high-secure care into the twenty-first century.

Originality/value

This research is located in high-secure setting. The social situation is marked by the extent of the isolation involved. A value is in this situation. First it is akin to the isolation of the tribe utilised by many anthropologists for their ability to adopt the “social laboratory” status to test out theories of behaviour in industrial society. The authors urge others to utilise this research in this way. Second, the situation represents the locus of so many of societies dilemmas, paradoxes and fears that moral issues morph from what is the mundane in wider society. In this way humanistic approaches are tested via action research with nurses in some rigouous ways.

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Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

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Book part
Publication date: 4 June 2019

Paul ‘Nazz’ Oldham

The key characteristics that eventually came to be considered to be Australian ‘heavy metal’ emerged between 1965 and 1973. These include distortion, power, intensity…

Abstract

The key characteristics that eventually came to be considered to be Australian ‘heavy metal’ emerged between 1965 and 1973. These include distortion, power, intensity, extremity, loudness and aggression. This exploration of the origins of heavy metal in Australia focusses on the key acts which provided its domestic musical foundations, and investigates how the music was informed by its early, alcohol-fuelled early audiences, sites of performance, media and record shops. Melbourne-based rock guitar hero Lobby Loyde’s classical music influence and technological innovations were important catalysts in the ‘heaviness’ that would typify Australian proto-metal in the 1960s. By the early 1970s, loud and heavy rock was firmly established as a driving force of the emerging pub rock scene. Extreme volume heavy rock was taken to the masses was Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs in the early 1970s whose triumphant headline performance at the 1972 Sunbury Pop Festival then established them as the most popular band in the nation. These underpinnings were consolidated by three bands: Sydney’s primal heavy prog-rockers Buffalo (Australia’s counterpart to Britain’s Black Sabbath), Loyde’s defiant Coloured Balls and the highly influential AC/DC, who successfully crystallised heavy Australian rock in a global context. This chapter explores how the archaeological foundations for Australian metal are the product of domestic conditions and sensibilities enmeshed in overlapping global trends. In doing so, it also considers how Australian metal is entrenched in localised musical contexts which are subject to the circulation of international flows of music and ideas.

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Australian Metal Music: Identities, Scenes, and Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-167-4

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Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Zainab Riaz, David J. Edwards, Gary D. Holt and Tony Thorpe

Construction plant and equipment accident statistics suggest constant re‐evaluation of health and safety (H&S) systems is beneficial. This paper aims to process analyse…

Abstract

Purpose

Construction plant and equipment accident statistics suggest constant re‐evaluation of health and safety (H&S) systems is beneficial. This paper aims to process analyse plant and equipment H&S management systems on UK construction sites, with a view to applying information and communication technology (ICT) to them as an improvement mechanism.

Design/methodology/approach

Five construction project case studies drawn from members of the former Major Contractors Group yield rich H&S process data. These are analysed using data flow diagram (DFD) techniques, to evaluate processes and proffer system improvements incorporating ICT.

Findings

Causes of unsafe practice regarding management of construction plant and equipment are found to include: aspects of the plant itself, management processes and operator competence. A new ICT “process paradigm” is suggested, the architecture of which incorporates mobile computing, automatic identification and data collection and a management information system.

Research limitations/implications

Findings contribute particularly to the fields of plant and equipment; and managing H&S.

Practical implications

Suggested ICT direction might form the basis of commercial interest in developing an all‐embracing H&S control mechanism for plant and equipment operations.

Originality/value

Application of DFD analysis in this setting is quite new.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2011

Dave Crick

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide longitudinal case history data from an investigation into the practices of an enterprising individual associated with two firms in the UK tourism industry. The first business had to be closed down despite the partners employing turnaround strategies to recover from a lack of planning, since an effective work/life balance was not achieved; the second has proved to be more successful due to entrepreneurial learning in overcoming earlier errors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology involved multiple in‐depth interviews with the key business owner and his partners in the two respective businesses together with supplementary interviews with staff and viewing documentation for triangulation purposes.

Findings

The findings based on a longitudinal case history suggest that some enterprising individuals may learn from certain past mistakes but could still need others to support particular business practices for them to succeed. The results also suggest that, even if a badly performing business can be turned around, owner/managers must be aware of the potential social costs that can be incurred in implementing strategies. As such, it demonstrates the need to learn from experiences and plan for social as well as work‐related issues to maintain a work/life balance, particularly in a “lifestyle” business.

Practical implications

The implications of the findings suggest that advisors (including university teaching) involved with assisting entrepreneurs make them aware of the need for effective planning. In particular, that the widely reported hard work and long hours involved in running a business can take a toll on personal lives and the work/life balance of enterprising individuals must be managed.

Originality/value

The main aspect of originality of the paper comes from the study of social costs of running an entrepreneurial venture, but the longitudinal nature of the study provides a further aspect of originality in this field of research.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Shellie McMurdo and Wickham Clayton

Roland Joffé, the film-maker behind the significant critical hits The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), employed a hypnotic aesthetic, which unflinchingly…

Abstract

Roland Joffé, the film-maker behind the significant critical hits The Killing Fields (1984) and The Mission (1986), employed a hypnotic aesthetic, which unflinchingly depicted violence and brutality within different cultural contexts. In 2007, he used a no less impressive aesthetic in a similar way, although this film, Captivity, was met with public outcry, including from self-proclaimed feminist film-maker Joss Whedon. This was based upon the depiction, in advertisements, of gendered violence in the popularly termed ‘torture porn’ subgenre, which itself has negative gendered connotations.

We aim to revisit the critical reception of Captivity in light of this public controversy, looking at the gendered tensions within considerations of genre, narration and aesthetics. Critics assumed Captivity was an attempt to capitalize on the popularity of the torture horror subgenre, and there is evidence that the film-makers inserted scenes of gore throughout the narrative to encourage this affiliation. However, this chapter will consider how the film works as both an example of post-peak torture horror and an interesting precursor to more overtly feminist horror, such as A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014) and Raw (2017). This is seen through the aesthetic and narrative centralizing of a knowing conflict between genders, which, while not entirely successful, does uniquely aim to provide commentary on the gender roles which genre criticism of horror has long considered implicit to the genre’s structures and pleasures.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Abstract

Details

The Capitalist Commodification of Animals
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-681-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Abstract

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

Gary Blau, Unnikammu Moideenkutty and Kim Ingham

The purpose of this study is to test for the distinctiveness of organizational versus occupational sportsmanship behavior, and then to investigate the relationship of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to test for the distinctiveness of organizational versus occupational sportsmanship behavior, and then to investigate the relationship of leader‐member exchange (LMX) to each.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 223 matched nurse‐supervisor dyads working for a hospital in Oman was surveyed. Analytic methods included factor analysis and regression.

Findings

Organizational sportsmanship behavior was distinguishable from occupational sportsmanship behavior. LMX or the quality of relationship with the supervisor was a significant positive correlate to both types of sportsmanship. Hierarchical regression results showed that LMX significantly contributed to explaining both types of sportsmanship behavior beyond the controlled‐for correlates.

Research limitations/implications

Sportsmanship, or the willingness to tolerate the minor inconveniences of organizational and occupational life without complaint, is important for the effective functioning of any healthcare institution. Only one dimension of citizenship behavior, i.e. sportsmanship, was distinguished, so it remains to be seen whether other citizenship behavior dimensions can show distinct organization versus occupation referents. How well will LMX correlate to these additional citizenship referents? The sample of nurses from an Omani hospital is also unique, so the generalizability of these results to other samples awaits testing.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, the study is the first to explore different work foci, organization versus occupation, for citizenship behavior, and test for the impact of LMX on both.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 July 2011

Theo C. Haupt

Abstract

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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