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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Alan Simon, Alastair Parker, Gary Stockport and Amrik Sohal

The music festival industry is challenged by intense competition and financial exigency. As a result, many festivals have either folded or are currently struggling…

Abstract

Purpose

The music festival industry is challenged by intense competition and financial exigency. As a result, many festivals have either folded or are currently struggling. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to show that motivator-hygiene-professional (MHP) strategic capabilities (SCs) are positively associated with quality music festival management thereby providing a playbook for potentially mitigating these challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed methods research design comprised a case study of a leading event management company as well as nation-wide in-depth interviews and questionnaire survey. The authors initially confirmed the nature of the challenges to the industry from the case study and the in-depth interviews. The authors then developed an MHP Model of 15 SCs that were identified from the literature and the qualitative research. The relationship of the MHP SCs model to quality music festival management was tested in the questionnaire survey.

Findings

The respondents suggested that all the SCs were related to quality music festival management. However, Professional SCs were considered comparatively less important than motivator and hygiene SCs. Across all three groups, interviewees highlighted the significance of artists, site and operational planning, financial and stakeholder management and ticket pricing. In addition, careful planning, delegation and quality focus, problem solving, resolve and flexibility, leadership and vision, communication and innovation were considered conducive to the quality management of music festival organisations.

Practical implications

The MHP SCs model and dimensions of quality management offer music festival event managers a detailed practical playbook for moderating challenges to music festival management. In essence the authors provide the specific drivers that festival managers should best focus their attention upon. Visionary leadership, artist differentiation, innovation, customer service and flexible management have priority.

Originality/value

The findings add to the festival management literature by demonstrating the importance of motivator, hygiene and additional professional SCs for moderating challenges to the music festival industry. To the best of authors’ knowledge, no previous studies have directly investigated specific SCs critical for quality event and festival management. In particular, the academic significance of this paper is that the authors have combined Herzberg’s motivator and hygiene factors with SCs, which are in essence success drivers, to create a novel holistic MHP SCs model for quality music festival management. Further explanatory insight is gained by the addition of a third factor of professional SCs.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Gary J. Stockport

This article considers strategic transformation and how organisations can learn to become better at strategically transforming themselves over time. Two case studies are…

Abstract

This article considers strategic transformation and how organisations can learn to become better at strategically transforming themselves over time. Two case studies are considered, Marks & Spencer and Intel, and these provide two contrasting examples of how organisations can either be reactive or proactive in managing strategic transformation. The article argues that in order for strategic transformation to become an art it must become part of the unconscious competence mindset of the organisation. A number of questions/statements are developed which help managers to fine‐tune their strategic transformation skills and these are interlinked and combine to form a strategic transformation framework. Thus, the article intends to be of practical use to managers.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Sally Giles, Gary Cook, Michael Jones, Brian Todd, Margaret Mason and Kieran Walshe

The aim of this study was to develop a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events, which may act as a prompt for clinical incident reporting in trauma and…

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events, which may act as a prompt for clinical incident reporting in trauma and orthopaedics and to determine what healthcare professionals understand by the term adverse event. A modified Delphi process with healthcare professionals working in trauma and orthopaedics (242) in three NHS trusts was performed. The process involved initial brainstorming sessions, a two‐round Likert‐style postal questionnaire and final focus group discussion. The initial brainstorming sessions generated a list of 224 adverse events to be included in the first round of the postal questionnaire. They included 83 causes of adverse events, 36 health and safety related adverse events and 105 clinical adverse events. Following the second round questionnaire and focus group discussion, a final list of 20 adverse events was produced. There were variations between professional groups in terms of validity scoring of individual adverse events. Overall, medical staff gave a lower rating to the adverse events than the other two professional groups. There were also variations between professional groups in terms of response rates. The modified Delphi process proved to be a successful tool for generating a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events and for understanding what healthcare professionals understand by the term adverse event.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

S.J. Giles, Gary A. Cook, Michael A. Jones, Brian Todd, Margaret Mason, B.N. Muddu and Kieran Walshe

The first phase of this study developed a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. This follow‐up…

Abstract

Purpose

The first phase of this study developed a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events for clinical incident reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics. This follow‐up study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the adverse event list.

Design/methodology/approach

Two follow‐up questionnaires were sent to healthcare professionals working in Trauma and Orthopaedics in two of the participating National Health Service (NHS) Trusts (n=247 for the first questionnaire and n=240 for the second questionnaire). Trends in routine incident reporting data were also monitored over a two‐year period to determine the impact of the adverse event list on levels of adverse event reporting.

Findings

The questionnaires indicated that awareness about the adverse event list was good and improved between questionnaires. However usage of the adverse event list appeared to be poor. Multiple regression analysis with the dependent variable count of orthopaedic incidents suggested that the adverse event list had little, if any impact on levels of reporting in Trauma and Orthopaedics.

Originality/value

The results of this study suggest that a practical tool, such as the adverse event list has little impact on incident reporting levels.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

Gary J. Stockport

Abstract

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2015

Alan Simon, Chloe Bartle, Gary Stockport, Brett Smith, Jane E. Klobas and Amrik Sohal

The purpose of this paper is to report on research that identifies the relationships that senior managers believe exist between capabilities and business success. In doing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on research that identifies the relationships that senior managers believe exist between capabilities and business success. In doing so, it addresses the need for more empirical research about the role of strategic and dynamic capabilities in organisational performance. It also highlights the critical strategic and dynamic capabilities that are most valuable for practising managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-method study was conducted. Eight types of strategic capability and ten types of dynamic capability commonly found in organisations were identified through consecutive literature review, web site content analysis and interviews with senior executives. A questionnaire survey was then used to ask senior officers of publicly listed Australian firms about the importance of each capability and financial and non-financial performance indicators. The relationship between capabilities and performance was measured by regression modelling.

Findings

Good leadership with an innovative vision and selection and retention of good staff and developing their skills and capabilities were the stand out strategic capabilities. Strategic thinking about the big picture and the long-term and flexible leaders who can lead and manage adaptation to change were considered to be the most important dynamic capabilities. Strategic capabilities were more often associated with indicators of financial success, and dynamic capabilities were more often associated with non-financial measures of organisational performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study to make a distinction between strategic and dynamic capabilities in examining the relationship between capabilities and business success. The results demonstrate that the distinction has both theoretical and practical value.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 64 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

G.D. Sardana and Tojo Thatchenkery

Abstract

Details

Management Decision, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Gary Davies

Presents a case history of a specialist health food retailer toillustrate the effect of the growth in interest during the 1980s inconsuming “healthier” products. Health…

Abstract

Presents a case history of a specialist health food retailer to illustrate the effect of the growth in interest during the 1980s in consuming “healthier” products. Health food shops had earlier benefited from the trend, but found it more difficult to survive once the concept was exploited by mainstream grocery and chemist retailers. The study is based upon two earlier analyses of the sector by the author. Raises questions about the future for all specialist health food retailers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Pete Alcock and Gary Craig

Based on a series of research projects which investigated the development and operation of anti‐poverty strategies by local authorities in the UK. Reveals widespread…

Abstract

Based on a series of research projects which investigated the development and operation of anti‐poverty strategies by local authorities in the UK. Reveals widespread recognition of the need for monitoring and evaluation in order to promote policy development and implementation. Describes an exercise to test out monitoring and evaluation procedures in a number of UK local authorities.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 11 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Abstract

Details

The Evolution of Goth Culture: The Origins and Deeds of the New Goths
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-677-8

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