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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Siohong Tih, Kok-Kee Wong, Gary S. Lynn and Richard R. Reilly

Rapid prototyping can potentially accelerate the entire process of new product development (NPD), enabling a high level of customer involvement and hence new product…

2029

Abstract

Purpose

Rapid prototyping can potentially accelerate the entire process of new product development (NPD), enabling a high level of customer involvement and hence new product success (NPS). This study aims to examine the relationship between prototyping and NPS, and the moderating effect of customer involvement, as well as the influence of speed of information dissemination on customer involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using the survey method through structured questionnaires. The key participants were management and team leaders from technology-based companies.

Findings

The results indicate that prototyping positively correlates with NPS, particularly when customer involvement is high. The speed of information dissemination, both from customers and on competitive products, has a positive impact on customer involvement.

Research limitations/implications

The study was limited by the undefined development stage of the prototype when offered for customer feedback. Future studies could focus on how customer involvement at each stage of prototype development affects NPS through a moderating effect.

Practical implications

The study confirms that investing in prototyping equipment for NPD increases the probability of NPS. Information capturing customers’ views and on competitive products in the market should be shared among the NPD teams. This could encourage better sharing of opinions and perceptions with customers about whether new products meet their wishes and expectations.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that customer involvement moderates the relationship between prototyping and NPS. The degree of customer involvement depended on the speed of response of the customers themselves and on how well competitive product information was disseminated within the NPD team.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Ali E. Akgün and Gary S. Lynn

Speed‐to‐market is cited as being vital in today’s competitive, uncertain and turbulent environments. To help companies in their quest for speed in new product…

3183

Abstract

Speed‐to‐market is cited as being vital in today’s competitive, uncertain and turbulent environments. To help companies in their quest for speed in new product development, many tools and techniques have been developed. One of the these techniques – team improvisation – is receiving a great deal of attention in both practice as well as theory. However, we know surprisingly little about improvisation in a new product development context. In this paper, we extend previous team improvisation models and test them in a new product development context. By studying 354 new product projects, we found that team improvisation has a positive impact on speed‐to‐market under turbulent markets and technology conditions, and there are some mechanisms that can facilitate a team’s ability to improvise, such as team stability and teamwork. We also found that having a clear project goal will detract from a team’s ability to improvise.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Ali E. Akgu¨n, Gary S. Lynn and Richard Reilly

New product development team learning is important in today’s turbulent and uncertain markets and technologies. However, the literature treats team learning as a single…

1983

Abstract

New product development team learning is important in today’s turbulent and uncertain markets and technologies. However, the literature treats team learning as a single construct, ignoring its multi‐dimensionality. In this study, we develop a multi‐dimensional team learning framework based on socio‐cognitive constructs. By studying 124 new product development projects, we show empirically that learning in new product development is best conceived as a multi‐dimensional structure with nine correlated but distinct constructs including: information acquisition, information implementation, information dissemination, unlearning, thinking, improvisation, memory, intelligence and sensemaking. Further, we demonstrate that a model based on the multi‐dimensionality of team learning provides a more robust explanation of new product success than does a unidimensional team learning model.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Ali E. Akgün, Gary S. Lynn and John C. Byrne

The authors report on their findings from an ongoing seven‐year research project on the intersection of entrepreneurship, marketing and technology. The focus of their…

2047

Abstract

The authors report on their findings from an ongoing seven‐year research project on the intersection of entrepreneurship, marketing and technology. The focus of their research is to identify factors that lead to better, faster and less expensive new product and service development. The present study investigates new product development practices in high‐technology small‐to‐medium enterprises (SMEs), including electronics and computer, biotechnology, military software, space, and electronic machinery companies. Gathering data from 60 new product development projects, the authors found that successful project teams perform certain practices better than unsuccessful ones. These include project visioning, process proficiency, management support, documentation systems, established project deadlines, team processes, and communication. Further, the authors identified critical success factors in the new product development projects as process proficiency, effective filing system, an established project deadline, information coding, and reduced formal communication within teams.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Gary S. Lynn, Alan C. Maltz, Peter M. Jurkat and Michael D. Hammer

Large firms have traditionally commanded a competitive advantage in the marketplace over small firms by being able to use their financial strength to perform large‐scale

4569

Abstract

Large firms have traditionally commanded a competitive advantage in the marketplace over small firms by being able to use their financial strength to perform large‐scale market research studies, to design and implement wide reaching advertising campaigns, and to establish computer and information systems to communicate with their staff and suppliers. This empirical study of 192 large and small companies indicates that small firms are using new media technologies to level the competitive playing field. Cost‐effective new media technologies are making it easier for small firms to enjoy some of the benefits that previously were only available to large companies. Contributes to the scholarship because little relevant research currently exists on the marketing uses of new media technologies for small firms and their potential for altering the competitive advantages long enjoyed by larger firms.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Gary S. Lynn, Ali E. Akgün and Halit Keskin

Learning in new‐product development teams is cited as being vital in today's competitive, uncertain, and turbulent environments. However, studies on accelerated learning…

2302

Abstract

Learning in new‐product development teams is cited as being vital in today's competitive, uncertain, and turbulent environments. However, studies on accelerated learning in product‐development teams are, surprisingly, lacking. This study proposes a model for accelerated team learning in new‐product development based on constructs borrowed from accelerated learning models (or “suggestopedy”) in the individual learning scholarship. It is argued that fast‐learning teams launch new products more quickly, and with increased probability of success. Moreover, specific mechanisms to help teams learn more quickly are within the control of teams. These include vision clarity, learning from customers and competitors, information coding, top management support, past product review, aggressive deadlines and daily meetings.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Soren M. Kaplan

“To understand that a technology — and the company whose future success depends on it — will eventually face the end of its lifecycle inspires urgency for, and commitment…

1250

Abstract

“To understand that a technology — and the company whose future success depends on it — will eventually face the end of its lifecycle inspires urgency for, and commitment to, discontinuous innovation.”

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Ali E. Akgün, John C. Byrne, Gary S. Lynn and Halit Keskin

Organizational learning and unlearning is a popular and important topic in business as well as academia. Even though there is a plethora of studies on organizational…

10239

Abstract

Purpose

Organizational learning and unlearning is a popular and important topic in business as well as academia. Even though there is a plethora of studies on organizational learning, surprisingly little is known about the conceptualization and operationalization of organizational unlearning. The purpose of this paper is to discuss organizational unlearning based on the organizational change and memory literature enhancing the organizational learning and change scholarship.

Design/methodology/approach

It is argued that unlearning is conceptualized as organizational memory eliminating, and is operationalized as changing beliefs and routines covariates in organizations. This is followed with a discussion of unlearning types, specifically, reinventive, formative, operative and adjustive, which are contingent on the environmental conditions. Finally, future research suggestions are proposed to leverage understanding on unlearning in the literature.

Findings

Shows that organizations first need to unlearn established beliefs and methods which have created rules and competency traps, in order to be receptive to new market and technology information.

Originality/value

This paper is of value in shedding light on the unlearning concept based on the organizational memory and change literature.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Allan Metz

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the…

Abstract

President Bill Clinton has had many opponents and enemies, most of whom come from the political right wing. Clinton supporters contend that these opponents, throughout the Clinton presidency, systematically have sought to undermine this president with the goal of bringing down his presidency and running him out of office; and that they have sought non‐electoral means to remove him from office, including Travelgate, the death of Deputy White House Counsel Vincent Foster, the Filegate controversy, and the Monica Lewinsky matter. This bibliography identifies these and other means by presenting citations about these individuals and organizations that have opposed Clinton. The bibliography is divided into five sections: General; “The conspiracy stream of conspiracy commerce”, a White House‐produced “report” presenting its view of a right‐wing conspiracy against the Clinton presidency; Funding; Conservative organizations; and Publishing/media. Many of the annotations note the links among these key players.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 January 2022

Ardalan Sameti

The literature on product design/development (PD) has attempted to understand the consumer but has not provided a comprehensive framework for product marketers and…

Abstract

Purpose

The literature on product design/development (PD) has attempted to understand the consumer but has not provided a comprehensive framework for product marketers and designers. Thus, this paper aims to compile and link the main topics in the literature on PD to create a foundation for strategic development in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

This research adopted a “fit-for-purpose” methodology, a cross-referencing method and a meta-narrative approach that are appropriate for reviewing studies in a field involving complex topics and areas in which the literature is still developing.

Findings

To enhance the quality of product development, there is a need for PD strategy based on a clear understanding of many factors: the consumer; the complex interrelations among a product’s values, dimensions and personalities; PD theories; and other related variables.

Practical implications

This study found that PD studies should concentrate more on codifying strategies to enhance product development success. This is particularly important in view of consumers’ varied and changeable tastes in the global market and the differing insights of product marketers and designers.

Originality/value

This comprehensive systematic review is a unique study that contributes to future business-to-consumer and business-to-business research by compiling scattered and hidden strategies, theories and variables in the PD/development literature.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

1 – 10 of 188