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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2021

Daniel Pfaltzgraf and Gary S. Insch

This paper discusses the technology gap in today’s newer hires where younger employees are often believed to be more technologically astute than they really are. Younger…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper discusses the technology gap in today’s newer hires where younger employees are often believed to be more technologically astute than they really are. Younger employees are consumers of technology, but they have limited skills in using technology to solve business problems.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper reflects a review of theory and research on technology training and practice.

Findings

Three recommendations are presented that could aid employers in bridging the gap between technology literacy perceptions and actual practice: build proficiency of business software, be the convener of learning in digitally focused training programs, and applying design thinking in business settings.

Originality/value

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, businesses have been forced to incorporate more technology applications in their operations. This has exposed a paradoxical gap between perceived technology knowledge in their younger employees and actual skill sets. This article describes practical suggestions for enhancing corporate training programs to address this challenge.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2019

Clinton O. Longenecker and Gary S. Insch

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the practices that high-performance leaders believed were influential for accelerating their development as leaders.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the practices that high-performance leaders believed were influential for accelerating their development as leaders.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of US based, mid-level leaders at Fortune 1000 companies who were identified by their organizations as being “high performers possessing the strong ability to deliver desired results for their enterprises.” The authors recently conducted focus groups with a subset of over 200 of these high-performing leaders and asked them to answer the following question: “Please identify what you would consider to be the five (5) most influential factors that accelerated your development as a leader.” Leaders were then randomly assigned to five-person focus groups to discuss their individual responses and come to consensus on what they considered to be the top leadership development “accelerators.” A content analysis of over 20 focus groups’ response sets allowed us to identify a list of top leadership development “accelerators”.

Findings

Seven leadership accelerators were identified: working for a great leader; experiencing an extremely challenging assignment or major organizational change; working in an organization that requires and supports skill development; possessing a strong mentor/accountability partner; ongoing personal reflection and self-assessment; experiencing a significant failure or career setback; and formal leadership development training/continuing education.

Research limitations/implications

It is important that leaders, HR professionals, and talent managers know and understand these factors and to make it an ongoing priority to systematically address the key questions that emerged from these findings.

Practical implications

Leaders should thoughtfully answer the questions presented for themselves and encourage leaders in their organization to do the same.

Originality/value

This paper, using primary data from “high-performance” leaders, identifies and explains seven important leadership development accelerators.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Clinton Longenecker and Gary S. Insch

The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific practices senior leaders need to engage in to best support their organization’s leadership development initiatives…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific practices senior leaders need to engage in to best support their organization’s leadership development initiatives. All organizations invest billions of dollars around the world in leadership development, but there is surprisingly little attention given to the important role that senior leaders play in supporting these efforts. This paper draws upon focus group research with those responsible for designing and implementing leadership development initiatives to identify the strategic role senior leaders play in formal leadership development efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore this issue, we conducted structured focus groups with over 250 executives, HR leaders and talent managers from over 30 different global organizations. Participants were responsible for leadership development in their respective organizations, averaged 44 years of age, 18 years of work experience, and were 54 per cent men and 46 per cent women. These focus groups were being used to solicit the input of those responsible for leadership development to identify the specific things senior leaders need to do to best support these leadership development efforts. The participants were asked to answer the following question, “Based on your experience, what specific things do senior leaders in your organization need to do to best support your efforts at developing high performance and strong leadership talent?”

Findings

Focus groups identified a series of key senior leader behaviors that are necessary to support an organization’s leadership development efforts. These findings, included the importance of senior leadership commitment to the process, the identification of specific leadership behaviors necessary to support these initiatives, the requirement of clearly understanding the organizations leadership development process, providing appropriate financial, staffing and technology resources to support these efforts, creating a climate of continuous learning and role modeling appropriate behaviors, among other findings.

Research limitations/implications

While the focus groups in this research and the subsequent qualitative and quantitative analysis of the findings were rigorous, the participants were not a randomly selected group and were by definition a convenience sample. At the same time, the implications of this research are significant on this important subject and provide a solid baseline for both practitioners and researchers alike to help explore, identify and build on best practices for senior leaders to support organizational leadership development initiatives.

Practical implications

Leadership is the key to success in any organization. To maintain that success, leadership development and continuous learning is imperative. This paper provides ten specific practices based on the focus group research that can help senior leaders create a more supportive environment for effective leadership development initiatives. The methodology used to identify these factors can be duplicated in other organizations to help them build an appropriate model for senior leader support for leadership development in their enterprise.

Social implications

The social implications for improving any organizations’ leadership is significant. It is known that effective leaders foster innovation, improve teamwork, create a more positive workplace, drive continuous improvement in quality, reduce turnover and improve the financial performance of most enterprises. With this backdrop, organizations can and must do everything in their power to accelerate leadership development and to engage in activities that do so. This paper will help pinpoint leaders and leadership development researchers and experts in that direction.

Originality/value

This manuscript offers a unique perspective on the role of senior leaders from the perspective of those who design leadership development programming in their organizations. And given both the readership and focus of this journal, this is an important perspective which takes into account the operational demands of leadership development in the strategic role senior leaders play in supporting these efforts.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2006

John D. Daniels and Gary S. Insch

This paper relates the different motives for transferring employees internationally to the conduct of each major international strategy (multidomestic, global, and…

Abstract

This paper relates the different motives for transferring employees internationally to the conduct of each major international strategy (multidomestic, global, and transnational), proposes seven hypotheses on these relationships, presents and discusses the results of a survey of heads of human resources or international operations in United States based companies, and concludes with theoretical and practitioner implications of the study and suggestions for future research. We found significant support for three hypotheses and directional support for two others.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Irene R.R. Lu, Louise A. Heslop, D. Roland Thomas and Ernest Kwan

Country image (CI) has been one of the most studied topics in international business, marketing, and consumer behaviour of the past five decades. Nevertheless, there has…

Abstract

Purpose

Country image (CI) has been one of the most studied topics in international business, marketing, and consumer behaviour of the past five decades. Nevertheless, there has been no critical assessment of this field of research. The purpose of this paper is to understand the status and evolution of CI research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review 554 articles published in academic journals over 35 years. The authors examine publication, authorship, and research procedure trends in these articles as an empirical and quantitative assessment of the field. The authors identify weaknesses and strengths, and the authors address disconcerting and encouraging trends.

Findings

The authors find a number of laudatory trends: CI research is becoming less US-centric, more theory driven, more sophisticated in methodology, evaluating more diverse product categories, and making use of multiple cue studies. There are, however, two major methodological concerns: poor replication and questionable generalizability of findings. The authors also noted the influence of CI articles has been decreasing, as well as their rate of publication in top tier journals.

Originality/value

Since the authors present data that reflect actual practices in the field and how such practices have changed across time, the authors believe the study is of substantial value to CI researchers, journal editors, and instructors whose curriculum includes CI. The critical assessment and subsequent recommendations are accordingly empirically justified.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Varsha Jain, Preeti Shroff, Altaf Merchant and Subhalakshmi Bezbaruah

A place brand is a culmination of its exclusive history, people and traditions that affect customer and community experiences. Place branding has become increasingly…

Abstract

Purpose

A place brand is a culmination of its exclusive history, people and traditions that affect customer and community experiences. Place branding has become increasingly important for collective heritage brand strategy, as stakeholders undertake efforts to create an aura of a distinctive geographic location. Though place branding has received considerable scholarly attention, there is a lacuna: the role of residents as co-creators of a place and its heritage. Accordingly, this paper aims to develop a “bi-directional participatory place branding” model by applying the stimulus–organism–response approach grounded theory.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory approach with multi-sited ethnography, personal interviews (with residents and city leaders) and observational techniques were adopted in a UNESCO world heritage city of India, Ahmedabad.

Findings

The findings indicate that the people (residents) aspect of place branding is associated with their life stories, past experiences, feelings and aspirations. However, the place acts as a nostalgia enabler, disseminating symbolic and heritage metaphors to residents and visitors as place brand ambassadors. When the place and people components are perceived positively, residents participate involve themselves with the place and thus, in turn, become the place ambassadors.

Originality/value

No prior studies have analyzed the association between residents, the place where they reside and the resultant behavior toward the place. The unique contribution is the bi-directional participatory place branding model, especially involving a UNESCO world heritage city rather than solely a site.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Arooj Rashid, Liz Barnes and Gary Warnaby

The purpose of this paper is to provide a new perspective by conceptualising country of origin (COO) from a management perspective, identifying the impact different COO…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a new perspective by conceptualising country of origin (COO) from a management perspective, identifying the impact different COO constructs have in the context of fashion retailer and manufacturer businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study comprises a series of in-depth interviews with key informants from large-scale fashion retailers and manufacturers in the UK.

Findings

The major findings of this research demonstrate that COO is considered a strategic business imperative but manifests in a variety of ways depending on brand positioning, long-term strategic plans, expertise, and brand values, etc.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the body of knowledge about the importance of COO. The findings of this research will have practical implications for manufacturers and retailers, informing the debate on the value of the “Made in […]” epithet. Findings are limited to the UK fashion clothing industry.

Originality/value

This research presents a new perspective on the COO construct, addressing it from a management rather than consumer perspective. It argues that COO can be considered as a strategic dimension, which is manifested in a variety of ways. COO has been extensively researched from a consumer point of view but this research takes a new approach by presenting findings from a managerial point of view, with fashion manufacturing and retail branding as the context.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Cathy Parker

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Dominic Medway, Cathy Parker, Simon Quin and Gareth Roberts

Abstract

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2019

Nicolas Papadopoulos, Mark Cleveland and Boris Bartikowski

Abstract

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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