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Article

Mehmet Ali Köseoglu, Yasin Sehitoglu, Gary Ross and John A. Parnell

This paper aims to illustrate how business ethics research is progressing in the tourism and hospitality (T/H) industries and suggest a research agenda.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to illustrate how business ethics research is progressing in the tourism and hospitality (T/H) industries and suggest a research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies bibliometric analysis to articles related to business ethics topics in the T/H fields published between 1995 and 2014 in six, nine and five leading hospitality-, tourism- and business ethics-oriented journals, respectively.

Findings

This study provides a broad view on business ethics research in the T/H fields based on leading authors, institutions, themes and methods used over the past two decades.

Research limitations/implications

This study assesses the progress of business ethics research in the hospitality and tourism fields. Only articles published in select, prominent Social Sciences Citation Index journals were analyzed.

Practical implications

This analysis focuses on published articles related to business ethics in the T/H fields. As such, it facilitates researchers, academic scholars and professionals in contributing to the field more effectively and advancing scientific progress in the literature. It aids practitioners by evaluating the extent to which scholars have investigated key issues in the field.

Originality/value

This study is the first to utilize bibliometric analysis to assess business ethics research focusing on T/H activities published in leading tourism, hospitality and business ethics journals.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article

Jon Drabenstott, Sherman Hayes, Tjalda Belastock, John Laucus, David Cohen, Gary Ross, Barbara J. McNally, Jerilyn K. Oltman and Steve Marquardt

Contributors from five libraries address the expectations and realities of their automation projects, including: staff impact, costs and funding, time and schedules…

Abstract

Contributors from five libraries address the expectations and realities of their automation projects, including: staff impact, costs and funding, time and schedules, users, computer support, vendors, and consultants. Some keys to success include: very clear political objectives at the beginning of the project; careful definition of the project structure; a well‐prepared automation plan; carefully‐considered, contractual commitments with a vendor; and flexibility and adaptability.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article

Kirk Mann

At a time when the future of the British state pension is being debated events in Australia provide an interesting example of an alternative approach. This article…

Abstract

At a time when the future of the British state pension is being debated events in Australia provide an interesting example of an alternative approach. This article examines the introduction in Australia of the 1992 Superannuation Guarantee Charge Bills (SGC). The article considers the key debates which accompanied the SGC along with the role of the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU), the poverty lobby and employer organisations in the reform process. The Australian model can not simply be transposed to the UK but the politics of reform in this case illustrate the issues of equity, exclusion and social division that are likely to arise.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 13 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part

Jerry Ross and Gary L. Albrecht

There is a growing consensus that there are often excessive medical interventions in terminally ill patients. This problem is usually seen as stemming from physician…

Abstract

There is a growing consensus that there are often excessive medical interventions in terminally ill patients. This problem is usually seen as stemming from physician decisions in applying new technology in a context in which financial costs have been borne by third parties. We believe this is, at best, a partial explanation for the phenomenon. The tendency to escalate commitment—to persist in failing courses of action—has been found by social scientists to occur in a wide variety of decision contexts. In ethnographically examining health care interventions in terminally ill patients, we found that a wide range of rational calculus, psychological, social, organizational, and contextual factors interact over time to contribute to excessive persistence. Intervention decisions reflect a complex, fluid interplay between patients, health care providers, institutions, and an array of external stakeholders. Effective revisions of current patterns of care practices must address the nature and complexity of the sources of the problem. We suggest a series of strategies including a new medical specialty to deal with these issues.

Details

Health Care Providers, Institutions, and Patients: Changing Patterns of Care Provision and Care Delivery
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-644-2

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Article

Donald Getz, Ross Dowling, Jack Carlsen and Donald Anderson

Generic factors influencing the development and marketing of wine tourism, both in destinations and at wineries, are examined. Results of surveys of wine and tourism…

Abstract

Generic factors influencing the development and marketing of wine tourism, both in destinations and at wineries, are examined. Results of surveys of wine and tourism industry professionals in Australia and in Washington State, USA, are presented, enabling identification of critical success factors. These are grouped as quality (of wine, service and experiences), wine country appeal, winery appeal, and developmental and marketing factors. Agreement on certain critical success factors did emerge, with quality considered to be the most important success factor, but some significant differences existed between respondents from the two countries examined. Recommendations for ongoing research on wine tourism are made.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

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Article

Terrance J. O’Malley and Kenneth E. Neikirk

Part I of this series appeared in the Summer 2002 issue of The Journal of Investment Compliance. It addressed the regulation of wrap fee programs under the Investment…

Abstract

Part I of this series appeared in the Summer 2002 issue of The Journal of Investment Compliance. It addressed the regulation of wrap fee programs under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (“Investment Company Act”) and the requirements of Rule 3a‐4 thereunder, which must be met so that a wrap fee program is not deemed to be an investment company. Part I also discussed certain issues arising under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (“Advisers Act”), including how program sponsors and any third‐party portfolio managers generally are viewed as investment advisers and are subject to the Advisers Act. Part II discusses additional Advisers Act issues such as suitability, fees, and advertising. It also briefly reviews issues arising under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (“Exchange Act”) and the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (“ERISA”). The information provided in Part II assumes that readers have some basic familiarity with Part I.

Details

Journal of Investment Compliance, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1528-5812

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Reality Television: The Television Phenomenon That Changed the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-021-9

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Article

Randal G. Ross, Sharon K. Hunter, Gary O. Zerbe and Kate Hanna

It is unclear whether information obtained from a one parent can be used to infer the other parent's history of psychopathology. Two hundred and one parental dyads were…

Abstract

It is unclear whether information obtained from a one parent can be used to infer the other parent's history of psychopathology. Two hundred and one parental dyads were asked to complete psychiatric interviews. Based on maternal report, non-participating husbands/ fathers had higher rates than participating fathers of psychiatric illness. For fathers who did participate, maternal report did not match direct interview of paternal psychopathology with sensitivities less than 0.40 and positive predictive values of 0.33 to 0.74. Psychopa -thology may be over-represented among fathers who do not participate in research. Mother report of paternal symptoms is not an effective proxy. Alternative methods need to be developed to: i) improve father participation or ii) identify psychiatric status in fathers who do not participate in research projects.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

Content available
Article

Kimberly L. D'Anna-Hernandez, Gary O. Zerbe, Sharon K. Hunter and Randal G. Ross

Understanding parental psychopathology interaction is important in preventing negative family outcomes. This study investigated the effect of paternal psychiatric history…

Abstract

Understanding parental psychopathology interaction is important in preventing negative family outcomes. This study investigated the effect of paternal psychiatric history on maternal depressive symptom trajectory from birth to 12 months postpartum. Maternal Edinburgh Postpartum Depression screens were collected at 1, 6 and 12 months and fathers' psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV from 64 families. There was not a significant difference in the trajectory of maternal depressive symptoms between mothers with partners with history of or a current psychiatric condition or those without a condition. However, mothers with partners with substance abuse history had higher levels of depressive symptoms relative to those affected by mood/anxiety disorders or those without a disorder. Our results call for a closer look at paternal history of substance abuse when treating postpartum maternal depression.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article

Ross Prizzia and Gary Helfand

The research is an administrative case study based on an extensive review of Hawaii government documents and interviews with key personnel of the Hawaii Emergency…

Abstract

The research is an administrative case study based on an extensive review of Hawaii government documents and interviews with key personnel of the Hawaii Emergency Preparedness Committee, civil defense and other relevant officials. Describes the interagency coordination at the federal, state, county, and community level to improve capability. Also described and critically evaluated are the roles of interagency emergency preparedness training, disaster drills, and coordination and partnership with the private sector, such as medical centers and the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s designated “disaster resistant communities” in Maui and Hawaii County. Recommends that more frequent interagency drills, increased funding for family emergency preparedness and local community response teams, and continuous training by emergency response coordinators could improve state and county disaster preparedness and concludes that, overall, Hawaii is adequately prepared in emergency response capability, particularly in the areas of medical services and interagency coordination.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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