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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Xiaopei Chen, Yan Zhang, Gary Pickrell and Jiju Antony

In this paper, experimental design techniques are utilized to understand sources of variation in an optical fiber sensor design and development project in a university…

1252

Abstract

In this paper, experimental design techniques are utilized to understand sources of variation in an optical fiber sensor design and development project in a university research setting. Application of the Taguchi method of robust design assisted fiber optic sensor development in a cost‐effective and timely manner. According to the analysis, compensation of the source of the variation identified in the experimental design results was achieved on a new design concept of a multiplexed optical fiber sensor. The experimental results and conclusions not only are suitable for this sensor structure, but also are useful for other fiber optic sensors based on the technique of Fabry‐Perot interferometry.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 53 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Ramona Ridolfi, Ame Stormer and Gary Mundy

The negative effects of gender disparities on nutrition outcomes for women and children are well documented. Gender analyses are often used at the start of projects to…

Abstract

The negative effects of gender disparities on nutrition outcomes for women and children are well documented. Gender analyses are often used at the start of projects to capture contextual factors contributing to persisting inequalities and malnutrition but there is a dearth of information about processes for applying findings to program designs and activities at the implementation level. The authors describe a three-phase process used by Helen Keller International (HKI) in 2015–2016 for a nutrition-sensitive program called Family Farms for the Future in rural Cambodia that included: (1) a community-based gender assessment; (2) a workshop to interpret findings from the assessment; and (3) a strategy to incorporate gender-relevant findings into program activities. The gender analysis used qualitative methods involving 32 participatory group activities and 20 individual interviews with men, women, and elders in the program communities. Findings and insights gained from this analysis revealed persistent and different gender disparities and perceptions from each respondent group regarding the reasons for the inequalities. A workshop organized to share the gender analysis findings with program implementers generated ideas and strategies for incorporating and translating findings into program activities. This three-phase process was crucial not only to reveal and understand barriers to socio-economic empowerment of women, but also to obtain buy-in from program implementers and to encourage use of their insights to translate findings into practical strategies and activities to address gender disparities that may influence nutrition and health outcomes of women and children.

Details

Gender and Practice: Insights from the Field
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-383-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

David J. Edwards and Gary D. Holt

Construction plant and equipment harbour significant health and safety hazards. One particular item, the mini‐excavator, presents a hazard from its inherent instability…

1633

Abstract

Purpose

Construction plant and equipment harbour significant health and safety hazards. One particular item, the mini‐excavator, presents a hazard from its inherent instability and tendency to overturn during use. The purpose of this paper is to investigate turnover incidents to observe prominent factors and contribute to development of best practice guidance for improving health and safety relating to mini‐excavator use.

Design/methodology/approach

Comprehensive documentary data from eight case study incidents, along with anecdotal data from a further three, were qualitatively analysed in terms of: machine weight, machine activity, ground type/topography, operator competence, type of overturn, damage to property, and injury to person(s). Results were presented to experts in the field for comment and conclusions/recommendations accordingly developed.

Findings

Observed prominent casual factors include: inadequate assessment of risk and non‐adherence to safe working practice, working on poor ground, and working on inclined surfaces. The use of sealed operator cabs and proprietary seat restraint mechanisms seem to mitigate risk of personal injury to operators during overturn incidents. A need for cyclic training to reiterate good operator and banksman practice is emphasised, while construction managers should also be aware of the risks, and help implement risk controls.

Research limitations/implications

Findings will inform construction plant management research generally, and the subject of mechanised workplace transport stability specifically.

Practical implications

Best practice protocol will inform health and safety management of mini‐excavators at the workplace.

Originality/value

Academic research into mini‐excavator stability is embryonic; this paper furthers evolving knowledge in the field.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

C. Marlena Fiol and Edward J. O’Connor

The purpose of Part II of this two-part paper is to uncover important differences in the nature of the three unlearning subprocesses, which call for different leadership…

1182

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of Part II of this two-part paper is to uncover important differences in the nature of the three unlearning subprocesses, which call for different leadership interventions to motivate people to move through them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on research in behavioral medicine and psychology to demonstrate that initial destabilizing of old patterns and the subsequent behavioral processes of discarding the old and experimenting with the new are qualitatively different.

Findings

Leadership interventions must fit the unique requirements of each unlearning subprocess. Discarding old routines requires continued focus on the costs of not doing so, as well as a progressive refocus on positive possibilities and engaging people in activities to explore them. When aspects of the old routine resurface, the costs of relapse must again become salient, leading to further discarding-from-use, followed by further positive experimentation. Finally, maintaining long-term release of an embedded routine requires recognition of the emerging new patterns and a shift from future-oriented visioning of possibilities to current satisfaction with the new.

Originality/value

All empirical studies of organizational unlearning imply some form of destabilization of old learning as an antecedent to unlearning, and many of them discuss subsequent behavioral and cognitive displacement. However, they have not clearly distinguished between these subprocesses to fine-tune how to motivate people to move through them. This paper addresses that gap.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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