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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2019

Gary L. Hunter and Steven A. Taylor

This paper aims to investigate whether preferences for certain types of privacy predict the frequency and duration of social media usage as well as the moderating role of…

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1515

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate whether preferences for certain types of privacy predict the frequency and duration of social media usage as well as the moderating role of gender on these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

An e-mail-based survey among the faculty, staff and students of a medium-sized mid-western university is used to gather data regarding preferences for privacy and social media usage. Using 530 respondents, structural equation modeling explores the relationship between the various privacy types, gender and social media usage.

Findings

Evidence supports a relationship between four types of privacy preferences and social media usage. A positive relationship exists between frequency of social media usage and a preference for not neighboring. Duration of social media usage shows a negative relationship with preferences for seclusion and reserve, and surprisingly, a positive relationship with a preference for anonymity. Gender moderates the relationship between preference for privacy and social media usage, offering evidence that intimacy, seclusion and reserve predict social media usage for males, while not neighboring and anonymity predict usage for females.

Originality/value

The study extends the privacy literature through investigating differential impacts of privacy preferences. The marketing literature examines privacy as a general concept, without allowing for differences in consumers' preferences for types of privacy. Additionally, the study shows that gender moderates the relationship between preferences for privacy and social media usage. A second contribution is investigating the relevance of a scale, developed in an age without social media, to an era permeated in social media.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Gary Hunter

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87

Abstract

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 July 2012

Randal G. Ross, Sharon K. Hunter, Gary O. Zerbe and Kate Hanna

It is unclear whether information obtained from a one parent can be used to infer the other parent's history of psychopathology. Two hundred and one parental dyads were…

Abstract

It is unclear whether information obtained from a one parent can be used to infer the other parent's history of psychopathology. Two hundred and one parental dyads were asked to complete psychiatric interviews. Based on maternal report, non-participating husbands/ fathers had higher rates than participating fathers of psychiatric illness. For fathers who did participate, maternal report did not match direct interview of paternal psychopathology with sensitivities less than 0.40 and positive predictive values of 0.33 to 0.74. Psychopa -thology may be over-represented among fathers who do not participate in research. Mother report of paternal symptoms is not an effective proxy. Alternative methods need to be developed to: i) improve father participation or ii) identify psychiatric status in fathers who do not participate in research projects.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Content available
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2013

Kimberly L. D'Anna-Hernandez, Gary O. Zerbe, Sharon K. Hunter and Randal G. Ross

Understanding parental psychopathology interaction is important in preventing negative family outcomes. This study investigated the effect of paternal psychiatric history…

Abstract

Understanding parental psychopathology interaction is important in preventing negative family outcomes. This study investigated the effect of paternal psychiatric history on maternal depressive symptom trajectory from birth to 12 months postpartum. Maternal Edinburgh Postpartum Depression screens were collected at 1, 6 and 12 months and fathers' psychiatric diagnoses were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV from 64 families. There was not a significant difference in the trajectory of maternal depressive symptoms between mothers with partners with history of or a current psychiatric condition or those without a condition. However, mothers with partners with substance abuse history had higher levels of depressive symptoms relative to those affected by mood/anxiety disorders or those without a disorder. Our results call for a closer look at paternal history of substance abuse when treating postpartum maternal depression.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Gary Hunter, Randy Vander Wal, Laura Evans, Jennifer Xu, Gordon Berger, Michael Kullis and Azlin Biaggi‐Labiosa

The development of chemical sensors based on nanostructures, such as nanotubes or nanowires, depends on the capability to reproducibly control the processing of the…

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1223

Abstract

Purpose

The development of chemical sensors based on nanostructures, such as nanotubes or nanowires, depends on the capability to reproducibly control the processing of the sensor. Alignment and consistent electrical contact of nanostructures on a microsensor platform is challenging. This can be accomplished using labor‐intensive approaches, specialized processing technology, or growth of nanostructures in situ. However, the use of standard microfabrication techniques for fabricating nanostructured microsensors is problematic. The purpose of this paper is to address this challenge using standard photoresist processing combined with dielectrophoresis.

Design/methodology/approach

Nanostructures are suspended in photoresist and aligned between opposing sawtooth electrode patterns using an alternating current (AC) electric field (dielectrophoresis). The use of photoresist processing techniques allow the burying of the nanostructures between layers of metal, thus improving the electrical contact of the nanostructures to the microsensor platform.

Findings

This approach is demonstrated for both multi‐walled carbon nanotubes and tin oxide nanowires. Preliminary data show the electrical continuity of the sensor structure as well as the response to various gases.

Research limitations/implications

It is concluded that this approach demonstrates a foundation for a new tool for the fabrication of microsensors using nanostructures, and can be expanded towards enabling the combination of common microfabrication techniques with nanostructured sensor development.

Originality/value

This approach is intended to address the significant barriers of deposition control, contact robustness, and simplified processing to realizing the potential of nanotechnology as applied to sensors.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Gary L. Hunter

The purpose of this paper is to identify variables that intervene in the relationship between shopping center image and frequency of visits to that shopping center…

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4948

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify variables that intervene in the relationship between shopping center image and frequency of visits to that shopping center. Variables investigated as intervening are desires, intentions, and positive anticipated emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

The method uses a two wave mail survey. One wave gathers intentions and variables antecedent to intentions while a second wave gathers behavioral data.

Findings

Findings suggest that desire (i.e. motivation), intention, and positive anticipated emotions intervene between shopping center image and frequency of shopping center visits. Positive anticipated emotions are not emotions felt while shopping but are the expected emotional consequences of achieving a goal, in this case visiting a shopping center. Visiting a shopping center might be a goal in itself or it could be the means to goal attainment (e.g. shopping to get a product).

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that results are aggregated across types of shopping centers and across respondent classifications.

Practical implications

Results provide evidence that desire, intention, and positive anticipated emotions intervene between shopping center image and frequency of visits to the shopping center. Implications for shopping center managers are guidance for allocating resources towards increasing desire, intention, and positive anticipated emotions.

Originality/value

The value of this study is investigation of the process by which shopping center image impacts the frequency of visits to a shopping center. Focusing on this process should allow shopping center managers to more efficiently allocate resources. The value of this study is offering resource allocation guidance to shopping center managers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Steven A. Taylor and Gary L. Hunter

E‐service is a critical strategic marketing consideration today for many firms, based largely on the promise of more cost‐effective models of self‐service relative to…

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9377

Abstract

E‐service is a critical strategic marketing consideration today for many firms, based largely on the promise of more cost‐effective models of self‐service relative to large (and expensive) call centers for technical support and customer service. The rapidly emerging electronic customer relationship management (e‐CRM) industry provides the primary tools for implementing e‐service. Interestingly, the e‐CRM industry faces the same challenges and strategic marketing considerations as their organizational customers, in that they must deliver exceptional service and support to the companies purchasing/using e‐CRM software. A review of organizational mission/vision statements suggests that e‐CRM companies are generally positioning themselves as exemplars of customer satisfaction provision and relationship management. However, recent industry analysis suggests that their organizational customers generally report low to ambivalent ratings on customer satisfaction measures (our study also supports these findings). This discrepancy could be partly attributed to very little empirical inquiry having appeared to date to assess the efficacy of existing relationship marketing theories within this fast‐moving industry. The current study provides an exploratory investigation that looks at the well‐established (in other marketing settings) relative influences of quality, customer satisfaction, and loyalty in the formation of future purchase intentions and word‐of‐mouth behaviors within the e‐CRM industry. Concludes that e‐CRM marketers must first identify means of increasing the overall level of customer satisfaction within their industry, and then begin to consider moving beyond customer satisfaction toward broader loyalty‐based strategic marketing objectives to support their relationship marketing practices. Practitioner and research implications of the reported study are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Tina Harrison, Kathryn Waite and Gary L. Hunter

To critically assesses the extent to which consumers are being empowered by the internet, focusing specifically on the role of the internet in the context of online…

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5464

Abstract

Purpose

To critically assesses the extent to which consumers are being empowered by the internet, focusing specifically on the role of the internet in the context of online pension information provision.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method study involving focus groups and observational research. Focus groups explored consumer meanings of empowerment and pension information needs. Actual information provision was measured using a content analysis of a sample of 20 pension web sites from 1996 to 2004 accessed from the internet archive.

Findings

While consumers generally feel that the internet is empowering, the sense of empowerment has not been fully realised in the context of pensions. The findings reveal gaps between consumer needs for information and information provision with implications for pension providers and consumers.

Research limitations/implications

Relies on consumers' own reported information needs. Pensions are complex and consumers may not fully appreciate the most relevant information in order to make an informed pension decision. Researching professional financial advisors could close the loop and help understand what information consumers should be using to make decisions.

Practical implications

Provides useful insights for pension providers and employers in understanding the value of pension web sites and the features/facilities that consumers value most in using them.

Originality/value

Addresses a key concern of government – insufficient pension provision – and helps to understand how the internet can be used to engage consumers in pensions and encourage them to take greater responsibility for and ownership of their retirement saving.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 40 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Steven A. Taylor, Gary L. Hunter and Deborah L. Lindberg

The purpose of this study is to advance marketers' understanding of customer‐based brand equity (CBBE) within the context of a B2B financial service marketing setting.

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7369

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to advance marketers' understanding of customer‐based brand equity (CBBE) within the context of a B2B financial service marketing setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Two nation‐wide studies were used to investigate whether brands are in fact differentiated in the minds of the target audience; test two competing explanations of the formation of CBBE using structural equation analyses; and reconcile satisfaction and CBBE theories within a single theoretical model.

Findings

The results suggest that these customers do differentiate brands, and that Netemeyer et al.'s model of CBBE is generally supported. In addition, the extended model of CBBE proposed herein explains more variance in loyalty intentions, while simultaneously demonstrating the importance of customer satisfaction in CBBE models, and incorporates customer attitudes into conceptualization of CBBE.

Research limitations/implications

First, the current research focuses specifically on CBBE. Second, the reported MDS results are exploratory in nature and must be interpreted with caution.

Practical implications

The results will help financial service marketers measure CBBE as well as relate brand power to customer satisfaction and customer attitude measurement through implementing the proposed framework in their own competitive setting.

Originality/value

The two nation‐wide studies reported herein enhance our understanding of CBBE and its relationship to customer attitudes and satisfaction research within a single theoretical model, as well as identifying the influential roles of both hedonic and utilitarian forms of brand attitudes in the formation of CBBE.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 3 March 2014

Judy A. Siguaw, Jule B. Gassenheimer and Gary L. Hunter

While prior studies have examined how loyal customers create value for preferred manufacturers, this study aims to focus on the supply chain and captures the indirect…

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1750

Abstract

Purpose

While prior studies have examined how loyal customers create value for preferred manufacturers, this study aims to focus on the supply chain and captures the indirect economic and relational benefits and costs of customer value creation on channel intermediaries.

Design/methodology/approach

Service-dominant logic is used to explain the rationale behind consumer contributions and supply chain connectedness in an interactive online world. Drawing from the relevant literature, a conceptual model supported by propositions is presented.

Findings

As manufacturers utilize consumer contributions, affiliated intermediaries will report having less informational power, providing less value to the channel, greater benefit-based and cost-based dependence, heightened efforts to create channel value, an enhanced reputation and greater sales, and greater collaboration with customers.

Research limitations/implications

This conceptual paper is the beginning of an investigation into the pragmatic function of a service-dominant view as it pertains to a marketing channel. As this avenue for research is further developed, it is important that the propositions included in this study first be examined.

Practical implications

Awareness of the underlying logic and the resulting impacts should aid channel intermediaries in realizing their own contributions throughout the manufacturer ' s value chain and recognizing changes to their positions of power. As a result, channel intermediaries should be better positioned to assess the health and future prospects of the relationship.

Originality/value

This work is the first study to examine potential impacts on the intermediary operating in a channel in which the manufacturer is significantly influenced by consumer contributions.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of 215