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Article

Gary D. Holt and Jack S. Goulding

This paper presents and describes an outcome-oriented dissertation study model called “PROD2UCT”, designed explicitly for students engaged in construction engineering and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents and describes an outcome-oriented dissertation study model called “PROD2UCT”, designed explicitly for students engaged in construction engineering and related subjects research.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is grounded in theory, underpinned by extant literature and reinforced with professional domain expertise.

Findings

PROD2UCT identifies seven key stages in outcome-oriented dissertation study: pick, recognise, organise, document and draft, undertake, consolidate and tell. These are described along with practical considerations for their effective implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The model’s primary influences stem from “best practice”, experiential knowledge, pedagogical ideals and academic views/values. Given this, it is acknowledged that “representation” and “inference” are typically governed by “subjectivity” (which naturally differs from person-to-person).

Originality/value

Originality is threefold: PROD2UCT encourages students to consider the “end” before the “beginning”; it serves as a road-map offering guidance at seven key chronological stages; finally, it is specifically designed to be outcome-oriented. The latter requires intended dissertation outcomes to align with evidence, research design decisions and implementation methods.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article

Gary D. Holt and Jack S. Goulding

This paper aims to consider an “-ological” (ontological, epistemological and methodological) triad in the context of construction management (CM) research, and to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider an “-ological” (ontological, epistemological and methodological) triad in the context of construction management (CM) research, and to explore the triad in terms of ontological/epistemological viewpoints, paradigmatic approaches to CM research and, ultimately, CM methodological decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Derivation of critical narrative and graphical models using literature synthesis combined with experiential, methodological views of the authors.

Findings

Conceptions of ontology, epistemology and methodology (the “ological-triad”) demonstrate high variability – resultantly, their use in CM research is equally inconsistent, sometimes questionable and, in the extreme, sometimes overlooked. Accordingly, this study concludes that greater recognition of the “ological-triad” is called for in CM research, especially at the design stage. A framework for doing this is proffered.

Originality/value

Combined study of the “ologies” within CM research uniquely consolidates previous disparate knowledge into a single, cogent, subject-specific discourse that, inter-alia, both informs and illuminates CM research challenges. It also encourages critical debate on the issues highlighted.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 03
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article

Gary D. Holt

This paper aims to consider opposing influences on workplace plant and machinery health and safety (PMH&S) innovations, highlight examples of these to model PMH&S…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider opposing influences on workplace plant and machinery health and safety (PMH&S) innovations, highlight examples of these to model PMH&S innovations’ effectiveness at the workplace, develop guidance for improvement of same and for construction of health and safety (H&S) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a qualitative meta-analysis of data distributed among a sample of published research in the field, and it uses inductive reasoning based on informal, qualitative and interpretative analysis.

Findings

Nearly all PMH&S innovations (positive influences) originate from original equipment manufacturers and specialist companies throughout the supply chain. Negative influences that can counter these potential H&S benefits result mainly from human (in) action(s) at the workplace. These are classified (and analysed) in terms of “error”, “indifference” and “lack of training”. “Tolerant” H&S management is another negative influence found among these classifications.

Originality/value

The study draws from a targeted meta-sample of research in the field, a model of positive and negative influences on PMH&S innovations that emphasises workers’ (in) action(s).

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article

Gary D. Holt

The purpose of this paper is to field a critical response to Kog and Yaman (2016) specifically; and more widely, to strengthen debate on contractor selection (CS) research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to field a critical response to Kog and Yaman (2016) specifically; and more widely, to strengthen debate on contractor selection (CS) research.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical narrative and opinion based on personal worldview, experiential knowledge and future insight/vision.

Findings

It is argued that enduring CS research has become somewhat stagnated. It has over-emphasised selection process models vis-à-vis the reliability and currency of their processing components, and has inadequately focused on achieving real-life impact.

Research limitations/implications

The principal implication is to engender constructive debate in the field and encourage a change of direction in CS research. The limitation is that this response reflects a personal view and so will be open to “challenge”.

Practical implications

Potential to encourage increased practicability, accessibility and generalisability of CS research products, leading to their increased real-life take-up and improved impact on practice.

Social implications

For society, the optimal implications would be improved project outcomes; healthier stakeholders’ financial interests; and an enhanced constructed environment.

Originality/value

The content is entirely original insofar as it comprises a personal viewpoint.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article

Andrew J. Smith, Andrew Fsadni and Gary Holt

The use of indoor living plants for enhancement of indoor relative humidity and the general environment of a large, modern, open plan office building are studied using a…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of indoor living plants for enhancement of indoor relative humidity and the general environment of a large, modern, open plan office building are studied using a mixed-methods paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative element involved designated experimental and control zones within the building, selected using orientation, user density and users’ work roles criteria. For a period of six months, relative humidity was monitored using data loggers at 30 min intervals, and volatile organic compounds were measured using air sampling. Qualitative “perception data” of the building’s users were collected via a structured questionnaire survey among both experimental and control zones.

Findings

Study findings include that living plants did not achieve the positive effect on relative humidity predicted by (a-priori) theoretical calculations and that building users’ perceived improvements to indoor relative humidity, temperature and background noise levels were minimal. The strongest perceived improvement was for work environment aesthetics. Findings demonstrate the potential of indoor plants to reduce carbon emissions of the [as] built environment through elimination or reduction of energy use and capital-intensive humidification air-conditioning systems.

Originality/value

The study’s practical value lies in its unique application of (mainly laboratory-derived) existing theory in a real-life work environment.

Details

Facilities, vol. 35 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article

Gary D. Holt, Peter E.D. Love and L. Jawahar Nesan

The business environment of construction organisations has undergone significant change over the last 50 years. As a result, construction management has had to respond to…

Abstract

The business environment of construction organisations has undergone significant change over the last 50 years. As a result, construction management has had to respond to issues such as increasing levels of client expectation, globalisation of the construction economy, cut‐throat competition, and tight margins, plus the “inherent” obstacles to operating in the sector, such as separation of design and construction, fragmented production methods, adversarial relationships, and a reluctance to innovate and take up information technology. Furthermore, the problems of poor and unstructured training, multi‐tiered management systems, and poor communication provide less than optimal conditions for achieving high quality products in good time and to budget. One approach to addressing these issues is through the concept of employee empowerment. This paper presents an overview of the empowerment concept in the context of construction management, highlighting the hurdles, an implementation process, and achievable benefits.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

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