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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Gary Gregory, Liem Ngo and Ryan Miller

The purpose of this study develops and validates a model of new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Drawing upon dual process theory, the model incorporates brand…

1348

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study develops and validates a model of new donor decision-making in the charity sector. Drawing upon dual process theory, the model incorporates brand salience and brand attitude as antecedents of brand choice intention, moderated by donor decision involvement.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 generates measures using interviews with marketing, media and research managers, and new donors from two international aid and relief organizations. Study 2 uses an experimental design to first test scenarios of disaster relief, and then validate and confirm a new donor decision model using large-scale consumer panels for the international aid and relief sector in Australia.

Findings

The results replicated across four leading international aid-related charities reveal that brand salience is positively related to brand choice intention through the mediating effect of brand attitude. Furthermore, the effect of brand salience on brand choice intention is significantly stronger when donor decision involvement is low. Conversely, the effect of brand attitude on brand choice intention is stronger for higher levels of donor decision involvement.

Practical implications

Managers should understand the importance of brand salience/attitudes and the implications for the communication strategy. Managers should also strive to understand the level of decision involvement and the relative influence of brand attitude/salience on brand choice intention.

Originality/value

This study advances the literature on charitable giving by proposing and testing a moderated mediation model of donor choice when selecting a charity for donation. Findings provide new insights into the extent to which brand salience, brand attitude and donor decision-making influence how new donors choose between charities for donation.

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Tuyet-Mai Nguyen, Liem Viet Ngo and Gary Gregory

This paper aims to examine the influence of intrinsic motives (self-efficacy, reputation and reciprocity) on online knowledge sharing behaviour. Additionally, this…

541

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence of intrinsic motives (self-efficacy, reputation and reciprocity) on online knowledge sharing behaviour. Additionally, this research investigates the moderating role of individual innovation capability and top management support.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted was a questionnaire survey of employees working in Vietnamese telecommunications companies. A total of 501 employees completed a self-administered anonymous survey using a cross-sectional design. Confirmatory factor analysis and ordinary least squared – based hierarchical regression was used to test the conceptual framework.

Findings

Self-efficacy, reputation and reciprocity significantly impact online knowledge sharing behaviour. Specifically, self-efficacy has an inverted U-shape association while reputation and reciprocity have a positively, returns-to-scale association with online knowledge sharing behaviour. Individual innovation capability moderates the effect on these associations as does top management support, but to a lesser extent.

Research limitations/implications

Data were obtained at a single point in time and self-reported. Furthermore, this study was conducted in a specific industry in Vietnam, i.e. telecommunications, which limits the generalisability of the research.

Practical implications

Organisations need to create a favourable environment for online knowledge sharing to foster reciprocal relationships and interpersonal interactions of employees. Encouraging and rewarding employees to actively engage in knowledge exchange will help facilitate reciprocal online knowledge sharing behaviour.

Originality/value

This study contributes to knowledge-sharing behaviour by uncovering an inverted U-shape association and positively, returns-to-scale associations between intrinsic antecedents and online knowledge sharing behaviour. Additionally, individual innovation capability was an important moderator which has been overlooked in past research.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2020

Lu Lu, Gary Gregory and Shawn Thelen

This research extends existing services offshoring literature by investigating how the type of information exchanged, technical support or personal billing, in conjunction…

Abstract

Purpose

This research extends existing services offshoring literature by investigating how the type of information exchanged, technical support or personal billing, in conjunction with country-of-service-origin (COSO) influences consumer likelihood to react negatively (boycott issue importance, NWOM, perceived service quality) to an offshore service exchange.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equations modelling is employed to assess relationships among constructs when country of service origin (New Zealand and the Philippines) and type of service provided (technical support and personal billing services) are varied. Using a scenario-based experimental design we collected 337 responses from a consumer panel across Australia.

Findings

Results indicate that both COSO and type of information exchanged affect service sentiment. Overall, consumers feel more negative and more likely to punish a company for offshoring to culturally dissimilar countries such as the Philippines than to culturally similar ones such as New Zealand. However, consumers were more concerned with personal billing services provided from offshore providers than technical support, regardless of COSO.

Practical implications

Practitioners need to understand customer sentiment about services offshoring in general as well as the relationship between service type and country of service origin when designing the global service supply chain.

Originality/value

This study extends theory by applying a multi-dimensional portfolio perspective in examining customer sentiment of offshore services. Understanding the underlying bases of customer concerns and how companies can mitigate negative perceptions allows firms to better manage service offshore strategy.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2019

Liem Viet Ngo, Nguyen Phong Nguyen, Kim Thien Huynh, Gary Gregory and Pham Hung Cuong

Internal branding efforts are essential in improving employee performance in services marketing. Drawing on reformulation of attitude theory, this paper aims to contribute…

1023

Abstract

Purpose

Internal branding efforts are essential in improving employee performance in services marketing. Drawing on reformulation of attitude theory, this paper aims to contribute to the internal branding literature by positing that while internal brand knowledge (IBK) is essential for transforming brand vision into brand reality, it is not brand knowledge per se but its integration with other brand- and customer-related aspects that drive superior employee performance. In particular, this paper develops a cognitive-affective-behaviour model of internal branding proposing that IBK results in higher levels of employee brand identification (EBI); this sense of identification then motivates employees to engage in both employee-related and brand- and customer-focussed behaviours (i.e. brand citizenship behaviour [BCB] and customer-oriented behaviour [COB]), which in turn foster employee performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were empirically tested using a sample of 697 from services industry in Vietnam.

Findings

The findings indicate a sequential mediation model in that employee brand knowledge affects employee performance (both objective and subjective measures) through EBI, BCB and COB. Employee brand knowledge results in higher levels of EBI; this sense of identification then motivates employees to engage in employee-related brand and customer-focussed behaviours (BCB and COB), which in turn foster employee performance.

Practical implications

Firms should understand that IBK may not directly result in high levels of service performance, and instead should embrace the culture of self-driven positive brand-connection attitudes that motivate employees to engage in BCB and COB that are consistent with their sense of self.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the internal branding literature by unravelling a pathway that integrates employees’ self-related psychological mechanism (EBI) and employee-related brand and customer-focussed behaviours (BCB and COB) through which employee brand knowledge is converted into employee performance.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01604959710164368. When citing…

35056

Abstract

This article has been withdrawn as it was published elsewhere and accidentally duplicated. The original article can be seen here: 10.1108/01604959710164368. When citing the article, please cite: Gary W. White, Gregory A. Crawford, (1997), “Developing an electronic information resources collection development policy”, Collection Building, Vol. 16 Iss: 2, pp. 53 - 57.

Details

Asian Libraries, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1017-6748

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Teresa Davis and Gary Gregory

This paper tries to draw links between the creation of new Diderot unities (products consumed in a group and that have an internal consistency based on lifestyle) with…

1445

Abstract

This paper tries to draw links between the creation of new Diderot unities (products consumed in a group and that have an internal consistency based on lifestyle) with “impulse purchases” as key departure products. A study, using exploratory in‐depth interviews, is reported. Common themes are drawn from the interviews to serve as possible identifying elements of the phenomenon. Emotive and cognitive themes are identified and are offered as a starting point for further research into such product unities. The self‐concept theory of “possible selves” is offered as one possible explanation that determines when an“impulse purchase” is a key departure product for a new Diderot unity.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Mark Peterson, Gary Gregory and James M. Munch

To evaluate the cross‐regional equivalence of repair service quality for mission‐critical equipment.

1537

Abstract

Purpose

To evaluate the cross‐regional equivalence of repair service quality for mission‐critical equipment.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the five dimensions of SERVPERF as a framework, clinical laboratory directors across Europe and the USA were surveyed about repair service for mission‐critical equipment. Assessment of construct equivalence across the two regions was then performed using item bias analysis. Following this, assessment of model equivalence across the two regions was conducted using both the Chow test of model equivalence and regression in structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

Results suggest that service quality in this B2B domain is perceived to be remarkably the same in both the USA and Europe.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could focus on repair services for other types of mission‐critical equipment, and another region of the world, such as Asia. Both of these steps would boost the generalizability of the study's findings.

Practical implications

The practical implications of the study's results suggest not only the applicability of the SERVPERF framework across these two regions, but also standardization possibilities in repair service for mission‐critical equipment because of the homogeneity evident in these markets regarding service quality.

Originality/value

This study should be valuable reading for those interested in issues related to service quality, as well as international services. The paper provides new insight into the relative importance of service quality dimensions, as the “responsiveness” dimension was found to be more than twice as important as any other dimension – even the “reliability” dimension.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Warat Winit, Gary Gregory, Mark Cleveland and Peeter Verlegh

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the distinction between global and local brands, providing a more comprehensive framework, which considers both…

11684

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to re-conceptualize the distinction between global and local brands, providing a more comprehensive framework, which considers both geographical distribution and ownership. It examines main and interactive effects of consumers’ perceptions of these factors, and studies how ethnocentrism (CET) and price affect brand evaluations, considering a range of price difference thresholds.

Design/methodology/approach

A preliminary study (n=243) examined main and interaction effects of brand globalness and ownership on consumers’ brand quality attitudes and purchase intentions in four different product categories. The main study (n=558) further explored brand ownership effects by examining the interaction of CET and price differences.

Findings

The preliminary study confirmed the distinctiveness of brand globalness and ownership. Consumers evaluated global (vs non-global) brands more positively, regardless of brand ownership (local vs foreign). The main study found that effects of price and CET varied considerably across product categories.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include the use of student samples from a single country (Thailand), and of scenarios instead of real life purchase decisions.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that perceived brand globalness positively impacts brand evaluations. Companies may cultivate a global brand image by emphasizing global cues. Local origin allows (global) brands to command a price premium, although this varies across product categories. An emphasis on globalness seems valuable, especially for local brands.

Originality/value

This research offers a refined conceptualization of brand globalness, a key construct in international marketing. Additional value is provided by studying price effects, which have received limited attention in international marketing, and substantial data collection (total N>800) in an understudied yet important economy (Thailand).

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

334

Abstract

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Content available
39

Abstract

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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