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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2008

Gary Garrison, Michael Harvey and Nancy Napier

This paper examines the role of managerial curiosity as a critical factor in determining the future impact of disruptive information technologies in a global organization…

Abstract

This paper examines the role of managerial curiosity as a critical factor in determining the future impact of disruptive information technologies in a global organization. Specifically, this paper presents curiosity as a managerial characteristic that plays an important role in identifying disruptive information technologies and facilitating their early adoption. Further, it uses resource‐based theory as a theoretical lens to illustrate how managerial curiosity can be a source of sustained competitive advantage. Finally, it examines the individual decision styles that are best suited in assessing disruptive information technologies.

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Multinational Business Review, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Mark T. Schenkel and Gary Garrison

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role various forms of social capital play in the performance of entrepreneurial teams in a virtual context.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role various forms of social capital play in the performance of entrepreneurial teams in a virtual context.

Design/methodology/approach

The relationships between various social capital dimensions – i.e. relational capital, cognitive capital, entrepreneurial orientation and team‐efficacy – and entrepreneurial team performance are investigated. Students in an upper division course were assigned to a project team in which they consulted with a company and collaborated virtually among team members to develop a database to add value to an existing company's operations. Respondents’ perceptions of team social capital were measured via an online survey. Team performance was evaluated independently by course instructors.

Findings

Results reveal that the perceptions of social capital in the form of relational capital, cognitive capital and entrepreneurial orientation are significantly positive predictors of team‐efficacy. Moreover, team‐efficacy is a strong positive predictor of entrepreneurial team performance in a virtual context. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.

Originality/value

This study makes three contributions to entrepreneurship research. First, it extends previous theory by systematically identifying the influence of a number of social capital dimensions as antecedents to entrepreneurial team performance. Second, empirical results extend our understanding of the impact of social capital by highlighting the distinction between social capital as a static and dynamic resource. The third contribution of this study is our explicit focus on how social capital resources might be identified and strategically leveraged in contemporary (e.g. virtual) contexts.

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Management Research News, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Enas Mohammad Alwafi, Chris Downey and Gary Kinchin

This study investigated the role of experienced practitioners in promoting pre-service teachers' knowledge construction and social interaction in an online professional…

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298

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated the role of experienced practitioners in promoting pre-service teachers' knowledge construction and social interaction in an online professional learning community.

Design/methodology/approach

A repeated measures design with control and experimental groups was adopted. Two practitioners supported pre-service teachers in the experimental group to discuss issues around teaching practice. Social network analysis (SNA) and content analysis (CA) were used in the analytical approach.

Findings

CA revealed that the practitioners increased pre-service teachers' levels of knowledge construction and high-cognitive discourse. SNA showed that the practitioners enhanced pre-service teachers' professional ties. Though collaboration in high-level knowledge building occurred predominantly in peers in the same discipline, the presence of the practitioners facilitated the development of more cross-disciplinary ties in the experimental group.

Practical implications

The practitioners can be considered as a pedagogical tool to enhance pre-service teachers' engagement in the process of professional learning. This study suggests that in order to enhance the collaboration among pre-service teachers from different departments, the online activity should be designed to enhance interdisciplinary collaboration.

Originality/value

The study contributes new knowledge about the ways in which practitioners can enhance the collaboration among pre-service teachers in an online PLC. It also provides insight on how to combine CA and SNA, to examine professional learning.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Chris Trevitt, Aliya Steed, Lynn Du Moulin and Tony Foley

The study aims to review the entrepreneurial and educational innovations in technology-enabled distance education in practical legal education (PLE) accomplished by a unit…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to review the entrepreneurial and educational innovations in technology-enabled distance education in practical legal education (PLE) accomplished by a unit “on the periphery” of a strong research-led university. It also aims to examine the learning organisation (LO) attributes associated with this initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a longitudinal case study based on interviews and reflective analysis, and reviewed using three “models” drawn from the literature: breaking the “iron triangle” (containing costs; widening access; enhancing quality); a tailored version of distance education appropriate for research-intensive universities; a strategy for successful adoption of disruptive technologies in higher education.

Findings

Entrepreneurialism yielded growth (PLE student numbers went from 150 to 2,000 in 15 years) and diversification (two new programmes established). The PLE programme advanced in two “waves”: the first centred on widening access and the second, on enhancing quality. Costs were contained. Both the presence and absence of LO attributes are identified at three different organisational levels.

Research limitations/implications

Challenges to academic identity may act to inhibit educational change, especially in research-strong settings.

Practical/implications

Business logic, and the creation and institutionalisation of educational development support – an “internal networking” group, were keys to success. “Organisational learning” in complex institutional environments such as universities involves understandably lengthy timescales (e.g. decades or more).

Practical/implications

Technology-enabled disruption in higher education appears relentless. While institutional and individual performance metrics favour research, proven cases of “how to do things differently” in education may well not get exploited, thus opening the market to alternative providers.

Originality/value

This is the only empirical example of a tailored version of distance education appropriate for research-intensive universities that we know about.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Book part
Publication date: 23 July 2016

Peter J. Boettke, Christopher J. Coyne and Patrick Newman

This chapter provides a comprehensive survey of the contributions of the Austrian school of economics, with specific emphasis on post-WWII developments. We provide a brief…

Abstract

This chapter provides a comprehensive survey of the contributions of the Austrian school of economics, with specific emphasis on post-WWII developments. We provide a brief history and overview of the original theorists of the Austrian school in order to set the stage for the subsequent development of their ideas by Ludwig von Mises and F. A. Hayek. In discussing the main ideas of Mises and Hayek, we focus on how their work provided the foundations for the modern Austrian school, which included Ludwig Lachmann, Murray Rothbard and Israel Kirzner. These scholars contributed to the Austrian revival in the 1960s and 1970s, which, in turn, set the stage for the emergence of the contemporary Austrian school in the 1980s. We review the contemporary development of the Austrian school and, in doing so, discuss the tensions, alternative paths, and the promising future of Austrian economics.

Details

Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-960-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Avi Rushinek

One of the most important aspects of managerial accounting is the accumulation of costs in the manufacturing process. This data is of value to the manager owing to the…

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2008

Abstract

One of the most important aspects of managerial accounting is the accumulation of costs in the manufacturing process. This data is of value to the manager owing to the information it provides him for planning, control, and decision making. The purpose of this paper is to describe the different costing systems, compare them, and show how they affect the accumulation of costs for product costing, as well as decision making.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Abstract

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Handbook of Transport Strategy, Policy and Institutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-0804-4115-3

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Rodoniki Athanasiadou, Adriana Bankston, McKenzie Carlisle, Caroline A. Niziolek and Gary S. McDowell

Postdocs make up a significant portion of the biomedical workforce. However, data about the postdoctoral position are generally scarce, and no systematic study of the…

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4548

Abstract

Purpose

Postdocs make up a significant portion of the biomedical workforce. However, data about the postdoctoral position are generally scarce, and no systematic study of the landscape of individual postdoc salaries in the USA has previously been carried out. The purpose of this study was to assess actual salaries for postdocs using data gathered from US public institutions; determine how these salaries may vary with postdoc title, institutional funding and geographic region; and reflect on which institutional and federal policy measures may have the greatest impact on salaries nationally.

Design/methodology/approach

Freedom of Information Act Requests were submitted to US public universities or university systems containing campuses with at least 300 science, engineering and health postdocs, according to the 2015 National Science Foundation’s Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering. Salaries and job titles of postdocs as of December 1, 2016, were requested.

Findings

Salaries and job titles for nearly 14,000 postdocs at 52 US institutions around December 1, 2016, were received. Individual postdoc names were also received for approximately 7,000 postdocs, and departmental affiliations were received for 4,000 postdocs. This exploratory study shows evidence of a postdoc gender pay gap, a significant influence of job title on postdoc salary and a complex relationship between salaries and the level of institutional National Institutes of Health/NSF funding.

Originality/value

These results provide insights into the ability of institutions to collate and report out annualized salary data on their postdocs, highlighting difficulties faced in tracking and reporting data on this population by institutional administration. Ultimately, these types of efforts, aimed at increasing transparency regarding the postdoctoral position, may lead to improved support for postdocs at all US institutions and allow greater agency for postdocs making decisions based on financial concerns.

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

John Rae, Gary Taylor and Carole Roberts

Collaborative Learning in group settings currently occurs across a substantial portion of the UK Higher Education curriculum. This style of learning has many roots…

Abstract

Collaborative Learning in group settings currently occurs across a substantial portion of the UK Higher Education curriculum. This style of learning has many roots including: Enterprise in Higher Education, Action Learning and Action Research, Problem Based Learning, and Practice Based Learning. As such our focus on Collaborative Learning development can be viewed as an evolutionary step. This collaborative and active group learning provides the foundation for what can be collectively called connectivist ‘Learning Communities’. In this setting a primary feature of a ‘Learning Community’ is one that carries a responsibility to promote one another’s learning. It goes further: Senior managers are mature and experienced learners; practitioners that are seeking to link experiential learning with the application of interesting concepts that aid analysis and understanding of real issues. This is collaborative and dynamic demand‐pull learning and not static supply‐push. Should we not aim in HE to combine learning and knowledge management? This paper will outline a developmental collaborative learning approach and describe a supporting software environment, known as the Salford Personal Development Environment (SPDE), that has been developed and implemented to assist in delivering collaborative learning for post graduate and other provision. This is done against a background of much research evidence that group based activity can enhance learning. These findings cover many approaches to group based learning and over a significant period of time. Within this we explore how collaboration, learning, and knowledge management all serve to create a connected community. This paper reports on work‐in‐progress and the features of the environment that are designed to help promote individual and group or community learning that have been influenced by the broad base of research findings in this area.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Gary Barber

This year's survey focuses on reference works published in 1980. The two exceptions, reviewed in Part Two, were deemed too important to omit (Women's History Sources; A

Abstract

This year's survey focuses on reference works published in 1980. The two exceptions, reviewed in Part Two, were deemed too important to omit (Women's History Sources; A Guide to Archives and Manuscript Collections in the United States, and Index to the Papers of the Continental Congress, 1774–1789, which supplements the Index to the Journals of the Continental Congress). Among the 1980 imprints are a fairly even mix of bibliographies, indexes, biographical compilations and encyclopedic dictionaries. The Harvard Encyclopedia of American Ethnic Groups is an especially outstanding work published in 1980.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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