Search results

1 – 5 of 5
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 1990

Gary Dessler and Dana L. Farrow

On 18 October 1989, Miami‐based Florida Power and Light Company(FPL), Florida′s largest utility, became the first company outside Japanto win the Deming Prize. Awarded…

Abstract

On 18 October 1989, Miami‐based Florida Power and Light Company (FPL), Florida′s largest utility, became the first company outside Japan to win the Deming Prize. Awarded annually the Union of Japanese Scientists and Engineers (and since 1986 outside Japan), the Prize recognises outstanding achievement in quality control management. Based on interviews with company representatives and a review of company documents, an explanation is presented of the implementation of a successful quality improvement programme in a service company. Topics discussed include the basic phases of such a programme – policy deployment, quality improvement teams, and quality in daily work – and a review of such a programme′s foundation elements: customer satisfaction, the plan/do/check/act circle, “management by facts”, and “respect for people”. Based on a literature review of other successful and less‐successful programmes, tentative prescriptions for implementing a successful quality circle and total improvement programme are presented, along with suggestions from FPL′s experience on the pitfalls to avoid.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 3 May 2017

Abstract

Details

Management and Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-550-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 27 November 2019

Waheed Ali Umrani, Rukhman Solangi, Mumtaz Ali Memon, Asmaa Hadeesa and Soonhan Khoso

Learning outcomes are as follows: Understand performance appraisal process and tools; apply theory X and Theory Y in managing resistance to performance evaluation;…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

Learning outcomes are as follows: Understand performance appraisal process and tools; apply theory X and Theory Y in managing resistance to performance evaluation; identify the causes and symptoms of resistance; identify and apply managing resistance approaches.

Case overview/synopsis

After attaining the height of success in terms of imparting quality education and contributing to the creation of many learned persons of the society, Public school Sukkur was facing the downward trending success for many reasons. After the takeover of management control by Sukkur IBA University, the school was upward trending for quality education, state of the art infrastructure, advanced educational lab, modern teaching methodologies. With such a change, resistance was a must. Both Active and Passive resistance from the stakeholders was impeding the success of newly named IBA-Public School Sukkur. Particularly, the resistance against the implementation of the Performance Appraisal tool and its administration. With the resistance from employees, Chang, Principal IBA Public School Sukkur had to come up a solution for the smooth administration and implementation of Performance Appraisal and manage the resistance from the employees and ensure the continuous improvement through performance appraisal.

Complexity academic level

Case study is applicable for the MBA students.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 7: Management Science.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

I.E. Jernigan, Joyce M. Beggs and Gary F. Kohut

This study of hospital nurses (n = 154) examined the influence of dimensions of work satisfaction on types of organizational commitment. Significant results were found for…

Abstract

This study of hospital nurses (n = 154) examined the influence of dimensions of work satisfaction on types of organizational commitment. Significant results were found for the two affective commitment types tested but not for the instrumental type evaluated. The results indicate that satisfaction with professional status was a significant predictor of moral commitment. Dissatisfaction with organizational policies, autonomy, and professional status were significant predictors of alienative commitment. None of the dimensions of work satisfaction were predictors of calculative commitment. The results of this study suggest that understanding how various factors impact the nature and the form of an individual’s organizational commitment is worth the effort. If managers do not know what causes an attitude to take on a particular form, they cannot accurately predict what behavior might follow.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 17 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Suzanne Richbell, László Szerb and Zsuzsanna Vitai

This paper aims to provide an original picture of a selection of human resource management (HRM) activities in the micro, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an original picture of a selection of human resource management (HRM) activities in the micro, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in Hungary and to explore the extent to which these activities can be related to variations in firm size and variations in firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study measures the presence or absence of a selection of HRM activities through a questionnaire survey of a large sample of 678 Hungarian SMEs.

Findings

Hungarian SMEs, in their working relationships, are closer to the “happy family” model of the SME than the “bleak house” model. Employee morale was perceived as high and only one in ten SMEs felt their employees were opposed to change. Owners were reluctant to seek advice from those outside the firm. They also showed reluctance to discuss future plans with their employees although they did tend to consult employees who would be affected directly by any change. Communication within SMEs was predominantly informal. Surprisingly, given the skills shortages highlighted by SMEs in other economies, very few of the Hungarian SMEs identified skills shortages as a problem and formal training programmes were reported only rarely. Variations between micro, small and medium sized firms are highlighted to emphasize the heterogeneous nature of the Hungarian SME sector.

Research limitations/implications

The HRM activities considered provide a picture of only a small number of HRM activities in Hungarian SMEs but the findings imply the relationships examined here are deserving of further exploration both in Hungary and other transition economies.

Originality/value

The paper provides a detailed picture of selected aspects of HRM in smaller businesses within a transition economy.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

1 – 5 of 5