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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1996

GARY D. HOLT, PAUL O. OLOMOLAIYE and FRANK C. HARRIS

The procedural and administrative aspects of UK tendering have remained largely unaltered for decades but this may soon change in light of the recent review of the…

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2575

Abstract

The procedural and administrative aspects of UK tendering have remained largely unaltered for decades but this may soon change in light of the recent review of the construction sector, headed by Sir Michael Latham. This paper presents findings of a nationwide survey of UK construction contractors assessing their opinion of the Latham procurement recommendations, along with their opinion of the authors' proposals for alternative selection procedure. Contractor usage/opinion of current tendering methods, tendering documentation and contractual arrangements are also identified. Analysis techniques primarily involve the derivation of contractor preference, agreement and importance indices (Pri, Agi and Imi respectively). Results show that clients are attempting to cut costs by increased use of open tendering coupled with plan and specification tender documentation, but that savings are offset by clients ultimately paying for contractors' costs associated with their achieving contract award for only 1 in 5 bids. Generally, contractors are in tune with the ideals of the Latham review and characteristics pertaining to the HOLT (Highlight Optimum Legitimate Tender) selection technique.

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Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 3 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Gary D. Holt

This paper aims to consider opposing influences on workplace plant and machinery health and safety (PMH&S) innovations, highlight examples of these to model PMH&S…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider opposing influences on workplace plant and machinery health and safety (PMH&S) innovations, highlight examples of these to model PMH&S innovations’ effectiveness at the workplace, develop guidance for improvement of same and for construction of health and safety (H&S) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a qualitative meta-analysis of data distributed among a sample of published research in the field, and it uses inductive reasoning based on informal, qualitative and interpretative analysis.

Findings

Nearly all PMH&S innovations (positive influences) originate from original equipment manufacturers and specialist companies throughout the supply chain. Negative influences that can counter these potential H&S benefits result mainly from human (in) action(s) at the workplace. These are classified (and analysed) in terms of “error”, “indifference” and “lack of training”. “Tolerant” H&S management is another negative influence found among these classifications.

Originality/value

The study draws from a targeted meta-sample of research in the field, a model of positive and negative influences on PMH&S innovations that emphasises workers’ (in) action(s).

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2017

Gary D. Holt and Jack S. Goulding

This paper presents and describes an outcome-oriented dissertation study model called “PROD2UCT”, designed explicitly for students engaged in construction engineering and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents and describes an outcome-oriented dissertation study model called “PROD2UCT”, designed explicitly for students engaged in construction engineering and related subjects research.

Design/methodology/approach

The model is grounded in theory, underpinned by extant literature and reinforced with professional domain expertise.

Findings

PROD2UCT identifies seven key stages in outcome-oriented dissertation study: pick, recognise, organise, document and draft, undertake, consolidate and tell. These are described along with practical considerations for their effective implementation.

Research limitations/implications

The model’s primary influences stem from “best practice”, experiential knowledge, pedagogical ideals and academic views/values. Given this, it is acknowledged that “representation” and “inference” are typically governed by “subjectivity” (which naturally differs from person-to-person).

Originality/value

Originality is threefold: PROD2UCT encourages students to consider the “end” before the “beginning”; it serves as a road-map offering guidance at seven key chronological stages; finally, it is specifically designed to be outcome-oriented. The latter requires intended dissertation outcomes to align with evidence, research design decisions and implementation methods.

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Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Gary D. Holt and Jack S. Goulding

This paper aims to consider an “-ological” (ontological, epistemological and methodological) triad in the context of construction management (CM) research, and to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider an “-ological” (ontological, epistemological and methodological) triad in the context of construction management (CM) research, and to explore the triad in terms of ontological/epistemological viewpoints, paradigmatic approaches to CM research and, ultimately, CM methodological decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Derivation of critical narrative and graphical models using literature synthesis combined with experiential, methodological views of the authors.

Findings

Conceptions of ontology, epistemology and methodology (the “ological-triad”) demonstrate high variability – resultantly, their use in CM research is equally inconsistent, sometimes questionable and, in the extreme, sometimes overlooked. Accordingly, this study concludes that greater recognition of the “ological-triad” is called for in CM research, especially at the design stage. A framework for doing this is proffered.

Originality/value

Combined study of the “ologies” within CM research uniquely consolidates previous disparate knowledge into a single, cogent, subject-specific discourse that, inter-alia, both informs and illuminates CM research challenges. It also encourages critical debate on the issues highlighted.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology, vol. 15 no. 03
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

GARY D. HOLT, PAUL O. OLOMOLAIYE and FRANK C. HARRIS

A quantitative contractor selection technique which embraces the pre‐qualification, evaluation and final selection processes is being developed. The emphasis is on…

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688

Abstract

A quantitative contractor selection technique which embraces the pre‐qualification, evaluation and final selection processes is being developed. The emphasis is on evaluating contractors' performance potential in terms of their ability to achieve time, cost and quality standards. This approach is in contrast to the majority of current selection techniques which tend to prequalify, then discriminate predominantly on the cost component of tenders. The conceptual model is applied to a hypothetical but realistic scenario of a contractor competing for a small industrial contract. This illustrates the mechanics of the new technique, emphasizing that contractor selection should include identifying the contractor with the best performance potential and not merely the lowest bidder.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Gary D. Holt

The purpose of this paper is to field a critical response to Kog and Yaman (2016) specifically; and more widely, to strengthen debate on contractor selection (CS) research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to field a critical response to Kog and Yaman (2016) specifically; and more widely, to strengthen debate on contractor selection (CS) research.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical narrative and opinion based on personal worldview, experiential knowledge and future insight/vision.

Findings

It is argued that enduring CS research has become somewhat stagnated. It has over-emphasised selection process models vis-à-vis the reliability and currency of their processing components, and has inadequately focused on achieving real-life impact.

Research limitations/implications

The principal implication is to engender constructive debate in the field and encourage a change of direction in CS research. The limitation is that this response reflects a personal view and so will be open to “challenge”.

Practical implications

Potential to encourage increased practicability, accessibility and generalisability of CS research products, leading to their increased real-life take-up and improved impact on practice.

Social implications

For society, the optimal implications would be improved project outcomes; healthier stakeholders’ financial interests; and an enhanced constructed environment.

Originality/value

The content is entirely original insofar as it comprises a personal viewpoint.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Gary D. Holt, Peter E.D. Love and L. Jawahar Nesan

The business environment of construction organisations has undergone significant change over the last 50 years. As a result, construction management has had to respond to…

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4752

Abstract

The business environment of construction organisations has undergone significant change over the last 50 years. As a result, construction management has had to respond to issues such as increasing levels of client expectation, globalisation of the construction economy, cut‐throat competition, and tight margins, plus the “inherent” obstacles to operating in the sector, such as separation of design and construction, fragmented production methods, adversarial relationships, and a reluctance to innovate and take up information technology. Furthermore, the problems of poor and unstructured training, multi‐tiered management systems, and poor communication provide less than optimal conditions for achieving high quality products in good time and to budget. One approach to addressing these issues is through the concept of employee empowerment. This paper presents an overview of the empowerment concept in the context of construction management, highlighting the hurdles, an implementation process, and achievable benefits.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

David J Edwards and Gary D Holt

The Control of Vibration at Work Regulations (CVWR), quantify workplace vibration exposure using exposure action, and exposure limit values (EAV and ELV respectively)…

Abstract

The Control of Vibration at Work Regulations (CVWR), quantify workplace vibration exposure using exposure action, and exposure limit values (EAV and ELV respectively). Hand‐arm vibration (HAV) risk can be objectively assessed using hand‐tool vibration magnitude data, for comparison to the EAV and ELV. When considering risk controls, one disadvantage of this ‘focus’ on vibration magnitude, is that it might deflect appreciation of the economic implications of such controls, resulting from for example: restrictions on tool usage time; the need for operator rotas where continuous tool use is required; and complications in estimating labour costs because of these types of condition. Based on a sample of hand‐tools’ performance data, this research developed ‘hybrid’ (performance/vibration) dimensions for quantifying tools’ efficacy; representing (interalia) units of work achievable to reach the EAV and ELV. These hybrid dimensions characterize an alternative performance‐based (and therefore financially related) way of considering a tool’s ‘suitability’ within CVWR parameters; over and above the (selection) criterion of tool vibration magnitude. Analyses are then presented that investigate the time and cost ramifications of using multiple operators, to sustain continuous tool usage while keeping exposure levels within CVWR limits.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Akin Akintoye, Gary D. Holt and Peadar Thomas Davis

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168

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2017

Akintola Akintoye, Peadar T. Davis and Gary D. Holt

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238

Abstract

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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