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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Jelka Geršak

The contribution presented here is the development of the system for qualitative prediction of garment appearance quality. The starting point for designing such a system…

Abstract

The contribution presented here is the development of the system for qualitative prediction of garment appearance quality. The starting point for designing such a system is a qualitative evaluation of garment appearance quality, based on the study of relation of fabric mechanical properties and achieved quality level of garment appearance, as well as the definition of elements of a system for qualitative evaluation of garment appearance quality level, i.e. its fit.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 14 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

KyoungOk Kim, Chinami Fujii and Masayuki Takatera

To suggest a garment for a wider market, the purpose of this paper is to assess the appearance of garments manufactured by a combination of four methods of flat pattern…

Abstract

Purpose

To suggest a garment for a wider market, the purpose of this paper is to assess the appearance of garments manufactured by a combination of four methods of flat pattern making and four dress forms from different countries. The paper also compares Japanese and British women’s evaluations of these garmentsappearances.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors made 16 garments by combining 4 pattern making methods with measurements from 4 dress forms and evaluated their appearance. The four dress forms were from Japan (Kiiya, called “Kii”), France (Siegel & Stockman, called “St”), the UK (Kennett & Lindsell, called “KL”) and the USA (Wolf Form, called “Wo”), and the four pattern making methods were from Japan (Bunka), Italy (Secoli), France (ESMOD) and the USA (Fashion Institute of Technology, called “FIT”). The authors captured 64 sets of pictures of the 16 garments with the 4 dress forms from the front and the side. The authors then showed images of the four garments made using the same pattern making method with measurements from the four dress forms to subjects for assessment. The subjects – 15 Japanese and 11 British women in their 20s – ranked the pictures in descending order of appearance.

Findings

Subjects from both countries rated garments manufactured using the Bunka and Secoli pattern making methods with the Kii and KL dress forms, and those made using ESMOD and FIT with St and Wo as the highest, even though the dress forms used for pattern making and those for wearing were not coincident. On the contrary, many garments made using Bunka and Secoli with St and Wo, and those made using ESMOD and FIT with Kii and KL were rated lowest in terms of appearance, even though the target dress form and wearing dress form were coincident. Therefore, there are appropriate body measurements for each pattern making method that can render the relevant garment more attractive, likely because these measurements are derived from assumed body proportions in the pattern making method of each country.

Originality/value

Although the evaluation of the appearance of garments is an important factor in garment manufacture, scant research has addressed this issue. Moreover, the comparison between Japanese and British women provided here will help manufacturers make garments that are more attractive to people in both countries.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

U. Biglia, A.F. Roczniok, C. Fassina and N.G. Ly

A simple measurement of fabric pressing performance as indicated by crease angle has been developed and applied to the prediction of appearance of wool and wool blend…

Abstract

A simple measurement of fabric pressing performance as indicated by crease angle has been developed and applied to the prediction of appearance of wool and wool blend tailored jackets. Industrial and laboratory trials have measured by the FAST system to give an assessment of garment appearance of lightweight fabrics after they are pressed.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2019

KyoungOk Kim, Maina Sakaguchi and Masayuki Takatera

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a suitable position for the bustline of the upper garment and its effect on appearance for various body types. It also provides…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate a suitable position for the bustline of the upper garment and its effect on appearance for various body types. It also provides an appropriate balance between the bustline and the waistline.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors manufactured five upper garments using a patternmaking method that allows for the distance between the side neck point and the bust point (BL) to be altered. The appearance of the garments on four dress forms with different values of BL was compared using Scheffe’s paired comparison (Nakaya’s variation) of seven scales. In total, 20 Japanese subjects in their 20s evaluated the garments. Six evaluation items – wrinkle amount, fit, attractiveness, beauty, youthfulness and slimness – were used. The vertical ratios of the garments on each dress form, a (projected distance between the horizontal line of the shoulder points and the bustline) and b (projected distance between the bustline and waistline), were measured using 3D scanned data. The relationship between the ratios and the results of the sensory test was investigated.

Findings

It was found that changing the values of the BL influenced the appearance of the upper garments. The upper garment for which the BL was adjusted according to dress form was determined to not be well-fitting, attractive and beautiful. The garment with an a:b ratio of close to 1 was evaluated as beautiful, attractive and better fitting than all others.

Originality/value

The results of this study will help designers and patternmakers create more beautiful, attractive and fitting upper garments.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

J. Fan, C.L.P. Hui, D. Lu and J.M.K. MacAlpine

As a first step towards objective evaluation of garment appearance, the present work considered seams on three‐dimensional surfaces which simulate actual garment surfaces…

Abstract

As a first step towards objective evaluation of garment appearance, the present work considered seams on three‐dimensional surfaces which simulate actual garment surfaces. The geometric profiles of the 3‐D seams were scanned using a laser scanner. 1‐D and 2‐D digital filters were applied to obtain pucker signals from the geometric profiles by removing “high frequency” components due to fabric surface texture and “low frequency” components due to garment silhouette and drape. The advantages and disadvantages of the 1‐D and 2‐D digital filters are compared. Four physical parameters are examined to see their relevance to the subjective pucker grade. It was found that log(σ2), i.e. the logarithm of the variance of the heights of pucker signals, is the best set of physical parameters for the objective evaluation of seam pucker. In addition, latest attempts at capturing and analyzing 3D garment image using a Cyberware laser scanner and Surfacer software are reported.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 11 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

J. Geršak

Garment is presumably the only product where, in the tailoring process, a two‐dimensional fabric is converted into a three‐dimensional shape without indirect physical…

Abstract

Garment is presumably the only product where, in the tailoring process, a two‐dimensional fabric is converted into a three‐dimensional shape without indirect physical remodelling of the material. Such a remodelling is directly associated with the physical behaviour of fabric structure, which can be treated as a very complex system owing to its constructional properties. Fabrics are non‐homogeneous and anisotropic materials. Very small stresses on textile materials cause extremely large strains, so that the deformations occurring are highly non‐linear. Non‐linear properties of textile materials and thus, connected deformations at low stresses are closely related to the elastic potential and influence fabric draping and fitting of the garment manufactured. For this purpose, the relationship between fabric elastic potential, as an important property under lower tensile load, and garment appearance quality, will be investigated. The investigation is subdivided into two parts. The first part presents the study of relationship between the elastic potential and particular mechanical properties of fabrics, whereas the second part of the investigation is concerned with studying the influence of fabric elastic potential on the drapeability, respectively, appearance quality of the garment manufactured.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2009

George K. Stylios

Examines the fifthteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

Abstract

Examines the fifthteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2008

George K. Stylios

Examines the fourteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

Abstract

Examines the fourteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

George K. Stylios

Examines the thirteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched…

Abstract

Examines the thirteenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George K. Stylios

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects…

Abstract

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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