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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2012

Weiguo Sheng, Gareth Howells, Michael Fairhurst, Farzin Deravi and Shengyong Chen

Biometric authentication, which requires storage of biometric templates and/or encryption keys, raises a matter of serious concern, since the compromise of templates or…

Abstract

Purpose

Biometric authentication, which requires storage of biometric templates and/or encryption keys, raises a matter of serious concern, since the compromise of templates or keys necessarily compromises the information secured by those keys. To address such concerns, efforts based on dynamic key generation directly from the biometrics have recently emerged. However, previous methods often have quite unacceptable authentication performance and/or small key spaces and therefore are not viable in practice. The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel method which can reliably generate long keys while requires storage of neither biometric templates nor encryption keys.

Design/methodology/approach

This proposition is achieved by devising the use of fingerprint orientation fields for key generation. Additionally, the keys produced are not permanently linked to the orientation fields, hence, allowing them to be replaced in the event of key compromise.

Findings

The evaluation demonstrates that the proposed method for dynamic key generation can offer both good reliability and security in practice, and outperforms other related methods.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors propose a novel method which can reliably generate long keys while requires storage of neither biometric templates nor encryption keys. This is achieved by devising the use of fingerprint orientation fields for key generation. Additionally, the keys produced are not permanently linked to the orientation fields, hence, allowing them to be replaced in the event of key compromise.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 July 2020

Lucy Reading and Gareth E. Ross

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social climate of therapeutic wings and mainstream wings within one prison, to identify positive areas of social climate that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the social climate of therapeutic wings and mainstream wings within one prison, to identify positive areas of social climate that can be built upon and areas for improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 1,054 social climate questionnaires (the Essen Climate Evaluation Schema – EssenCES) were sent to prisoner-facing staff and all prisoners within an English Category B prison holding indeterminate sentenced prisoners. Perceptions of social climate on therapeutic wings and mainstream wings and perceptions of social climate between staff and prisoners were compared.

Findings

The results showed that the therapeutic wings felt safer, there were better staff-prisoner relationships and there was better peer support among prisoners than people on the mainstream wings. Also, prisoners felt safer than staff, staff rated the overall social climate as more positive than prisoners and staff felt that they supported prisoners, but prisoners did not feel the same.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is that the EssenCES measure does not explain the participants’ ratings of the social climate.

Practical implications

There is a need to transfer the principles and values of therapeutic wings to mainstream wings. In addition, there is significant room for improvement in the social climate of this prison.

Originality/value

This is the first study to compare the social climate of therapeutic and mainstream wings within one single prison. The research has a valuable contribution to the development of positive social climates conducive to better clinical outcomes.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 December 2000

Bruce A. Arrigo and Christopher R. Williams

Abstract

Details

Sociology of Crime, Law and Deviance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-889-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Richard A.E. North, Jim P. Duguid and Michael A. Sheard

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative…

Abstract

Describes a study to measure the quality of service provided by food‐poisoning surveillance agencies in England and Wales in terms of the requirements of a representative consumer ‐ the egg producing industry ‐ adopting “egg associated” outbreak investigation reports as the reference output. Defines and makes use of four primary performance indicators: accessibility of information; completeness of evidence supplied in food‐poisoning outbreak investigation reports as to the sources of infection in “egg‐associated” outbreaks; timeliness of information published; and utility of information and advice aimed at preventing or controlling food poisoning. Finds that quality expectations in each parameter measured are not met. Examines reasons why surveillance agencies have not delivered the quality demanded. Makes use of detailed case studies to illustrate inadequacies of current practice. Attributes failure to deliver “accessibility” to a lack of recognition on the status or nature of “consumers”, combined with a self‐maintenance motivation of the part of the surveillance agencies. Finds that failures to deliver “completeness” and “utility” may result from the same defects which give rise to the lack of “accessibility” in that, failing to recognize the consumers of a public service for what they are, the agencies feel no need to provide them with the data they require. The research indicates that self‐maintenance by scientific epidemiologists may introduce biases which when combined with a politically inspired need to transfer responsibility for food‐poisoning outbreaks, skew the conduct of investigations and their conclusions. Contends that this is compounded by serious and multiple inadequacies in the conduct of investigations, arising at least in part from the lack of training and relative inexperience of investigators, the whole conditioned by interdisciplinary rivalry between the professional groups staffing the different agencies. Finds that in addition failures to exploit or develop epidemiological technologies has affected the ability of investigators to resolve the uncertainties identified. Makes recommendations directed at improving the performance of the surveillance agencies which, if adopted will substantially enhance food poisoning control efforts.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2011

Stefan Schwarzkopf

This paper aims to provide an overview over the development of historical research into advertising from the early twentieth century. Its main purposes are to interest…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview over the development of historical research into advertising from the early twentieth century. Its main purposes are to interest marketing scholars and business historians in the history of advertising, help scholars that are unfamiliar with the field in choosing an appropriate theoretical and methodological angle, and provide a critique of a range of methods and theoretical approaches being applied in advertising historical research.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design of this paper is based on historiographical analysis and method critique. It surveys the advertising historical literature of the three decades between 1980 and 2010, and it compares and contrasts dominant research methodologies and theoretical paradigms that have been used by historians and advertising researchers.

Findings

Much advertising historical research is based on a specific set of theoretical paradigms (“Modernization”, “Americanization”, and “Semiotics”), without being aware of the manifest impact they have on the narratives and understandings that historians create. Identifying these paradigms and outlining their impact will help marketing historians and advertising researchers to avoid the pitfalls associated with particular paradigms.

Originality/value

This paper subjects the modern historiography of advertising to a methodological and narratological analysis. It uses this analysis to propose new and somewhat more critical directions in advertising historical research.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

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