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Article
Publication date: 15 May 2017

Gareth H. Rees and Robin Gauld

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the effects of the introduction of lean into healthcare workplaces, phenomena that have not been widely investigated.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review and discuss the effects of the introduction of lean into healthcare workplaces, phenomena that have not been widely investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on discussions and findings from the literature. It seeks to bring the few geographically dispersed experiences and case studies together to draw some conclusions regarding lean’s negative effects.

Findings

Two recurring themes emerge. The first is there is little evidence of Lean’s impact on work and the people who perform it. The literature therefore suggests that we understand very little about how work conditions are changed and how Lean’s negative effects arise and may be managed in healthcare workplaces. A second observation is that Lean’s effects are ambiguous. For some Lean seems to intensify work, while for others it leads to improved job satisfaction and productivity. Given this variety, the paper suggests a research emphasis on Lean’s socio-cultural side and to derive more data on how work and its processes change, particularly in the context of healthcare team-working.

Originality/value

The paper concludes that without improved understanding of social contexts of Lean interventions its value for healthcare improvement may be limited. Future research should also include a focus on how the work is changed and whether high-performance work system practices may be used to offset Lean’s negative effects.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2018

Oswaldo Morales, Andrew N. Kleit and Gareth H. Rees

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a country’s mixed history of colonialism and cultural heritage as a background to the management of a mining company’s community…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a country’s mixed history of colonialism and cultural heritage as a background to the management of a mining company’s community engagement. Mining-related social conflicts have intensified in Peru as mining expansion challenges Andean people’s traditional livelihoods. It is generally thought that resolving such conflicts requires a set of long-term strategies and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study has been developed using an inductive methodology through content analysis of newspaper reports, official documents and the academic literature. It follows a complex and evolving situation, blending social and cultural theory and norms with actual events to provide insight into the conflicts’ historical, social and cultural forces.

Findings

Mining conflicts are complex business and strategic problems that call for a more thorough analysis of causal variables and a deeper understanding of the underlying cultural and historical forces. Transactional community engagement responses may not always be adequate to maintain a mining project’s social licence.

Originality/value

Based on the information presented, students can use the case as a means to examine and critique community engagement approaches to social conflict resolution through this summary of a real-life example of social conflict in Peru’s mining industry. The case may also be used as the basis for teaching forward planning and contingency management for long-term projects involving stakeholders and potential conflict. The case has been used as a resource for teaching communications, risk evaluation and community engagement strategies as part of a Master’s in the Energy Sector Management programme in Peru.

Propósito

Este caso propone una introducción a la historia del colonialismo y multiculturalismo en el Perú relacionado con el manejo de las relaciones comunitarias por parte del sector minero. Los conflictos sociales provenientes de la actividad minera se han intensificado en el Perú debido a que esta industria insiste en desafiar el estilo de vida de los pueblos andinos. Se piensa que una solución de estos conflictos requiere un conjunto de estrategias y compromisos a largo plazo.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

El estudio de caso se ha desarrollado utilizando una metodología inductiva a través del análisis de contenido de informes periodísticos, documentos oficiales y la literatura académica. Se analiza una situación compleja, mezclando la teoría y las normas sociales y culturales con los acontecimientos actuales para proporcionar una visión de las fuerzas históricas, sociales y culturales que sustentan los acontecimientos que ocurren.

Hallazgos

Los conflictos mineros son problemas de negocios complejos y estratégicos que requieren un análisis más profundo de las variables causales y una comprensión más profunda de las fuerzas culturales e históricas subyacentes. Las respuestas transaccionales de participación de la comunidad no siempre son adecuadas para mantener la licencia social de un proyecto minero.

Originalidad/valor

Basados en la información presentada, los estudiantes pueden usar el caso como un medio para examinar y criticar los enfoques de participación comunitaria en la resolución de conflictos sociales a través de un ejemplo real de conflicto social en la industria minera peruana. El caso también puede utilizarse como base para enseñar la planificación anticipada y la gestión de contingencias para proyectos a largo plazo que involucren a las partes interesadas. El caso se ha utilizado como recurso para la enseñanza de comunicaciones, estrategia, evaluación de riesgos y de participación comunitaria como parte de un programa de Maestría en Gestión del Sector Energético en Perú.

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2018

Fidel Amésquita Cubillas, Oswaldo Morales and Gareth H. Rees

This paper aims to focus on the influences that lead individuals to create and continue with operating informal business ventures in Peru. It seeks to empirically identify…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to focus on the influences that lead individuals to create and continue with operating informal business ventures in Peru. It seeks to empirically identify the factors that are significant in forming the intentions of entrepreneurs to begin or continue with their informal businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

The theory of planned behaviour (TPB) is applied using data gathered from interviews with informal domestic gas cylinder sellers using a formally conducted survey. Using structural equation modelling, the constructs that influence the entrepreneurial intentions of informal gas sellers in Lima, Peru, are determined.

Findings

Of the three TPB constructs, attitude was found to be most significant, reflecting a belief of informality’s benefits, social norm was also significant, revealing the importance of the opinions of family, whereas perceived behavioural control was found not to be significant.

Originality/value

These results provide confirmation of a policy approach developed to address the high rates of business informality while maintaining safety in a highly regulated industry segment. By providing insight into factors beyond economic drivers, the study reveals that an understanding of the prevailing social environment is important for the development of policies dealing with informal entrepreneurship.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Gareth H. Rees, Peter Crampton, Robin Gauld and Stephen MacDonell

Integrated care presents health workforce planners with significant uncertainty. This results from: (1) these workforces are likely in the future to be different from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrated care presents health workforce planners with significant uncertainty. This results from: (1) these workforces are likely in the future to be different from the present, (2) integrated care's variable definitions and (3) workforce policy and planning is not familiar with addressing such challenges. One means to deal with uncertainty is scenario analysis. In this study we reveal some integration-supportive workforce governance and planning policies that were derived from the application of scenario analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a mixed methods design that applies content analysis, scenario construction and the policy Delphi method, we analysed a set of New Zealand's older persons health sector workforce scenarios. Developed from data gathered from workforce documents and studies, the scenarios were evaluated by a suitably qualified panel, and derived policy statements were assessed for desirability and feasibility.

Findings

One scenario was found to be most favourable, based on its broad focus, inclusion of prevention and references to patient dignity, although funding changes were indicated as necessary for its realisation. The integration-supportive policies are based on promoting network-based care models, patient-centric funding that promotes collaboration and the enhancement of interprofessional education and educator involvement.

Originality/value

Scenario analysis for policy production is rare in health workforce planning. We show how it is possible to identify policies to address an integrated care workforce's development using this method. The article provides value for planners and decision-makers by identifying the pros and cons of future situations and offers guidance on how to reduce uncertainty through policy rehearsal and reflection.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 April 2019

Puneeta Ajmera and Vineet Jain

Lean concept is implemented in healthcare organizations, as it deals with improvement processes so that best services may be provided to the patients and competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

Lean concept is implemented in healthcare organizations, as it deals with improvement processes so that best services may be provided to the patients and competitive advantage may be achieved. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the important factors which influence implementation of lean principles in the healthcare industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The factors influencing lean implementation in the healthcare industry have been determined through literature review and results of a survey where questionnaires were distributed among 325 healthcare professionals. Fuzzy Interpretive Structural Modeling (FISM) approach has been used to analyze the interrelationships among these factors. A FISM model has been developed to extract the key factors influencing lean implementation.

Findings

Results of the survey and model show that lean leadership, professional organizational culture and teamwork and interdepartmental cooperation are the top level factors. Clarity of organizational vision, communication of goals and results, follow up and evaluations are the factors with strong driving as well as strong dependence power. Even a slight action taken on these factors will have a significant impact on other factors.

Practical implications

The healthcare professionals and managers can acquire information from the drive power dependence matrix so that they can thoroughly understand the relative importance, interdependencies and relationships among these factors. The model will help in determining the hierarchy of various actions and activities which may be taken by the management for managing the factors that remarkably affect the lean management in hospitals.

Social implications

In this paper, only 15 variables appropriate for the Indian healthcare industry have been identified. The model developed in the present research has not been validated statistically which can be done by structural equation modeling (SEM).

Originality/value

Though there are various studies which depict that lean principles have been implemented successfully in various industries, there are few studies specifying the application of lean principles in healthcare sector in India. This paper is an attempt to identify various factors which are important for application of Lean concept in the healthcare sector.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Daniel J. Rees, Victoria Bates, Roderick A. Thomas, Simon B. Brooks, Hamish Laing, Gareth H. Davies, Michael Williams, Leighton Phillips and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

The UK Government-funded National Health Service (NHS) is experiencing significant pressures because of the complexity of challenges to, and demands of, health-care…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK Government-funded National Health Service (NHS) is experiencing significant pressures because of the complexity of challenges to, and demands of, health-care provision. This situation has driven government policy level support for transformational change initiatives, such as value-based health care (VBHC), through closer alignment and collaboration across the health-care system-life science sector nexus. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the necessary antecedents to collaboration in VBHC through a critical exploration of the existing literature, with a view to establishing the foundations for further development of policy, practice and theory in this field.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was conducted via searches on Scopus and Google Scholar between 2009 and 2019 for peer-reviewed articles containing keywords and phrases “Value-based healthcare industry” and “healthcare industry collaboration”. Refinement of the results led to the identification of “guiding conditions” (GCs) for collaboration in VBHC.

Findings

Five literature-derived GCs were identified as necessary for the successful implementation of initiatives such as VBHC through system-sector collaboration. These are: a multi-disciplinarity; use of appropriate technological infrastructure; capturing meaningful metrics; understanding the total cycle-of-care; and financial flexibility. This paper outlines research opportunities to empirically test the relevance of the five GCs with regard to improving system-sector collaboration on VBHC.

Originality/value

This paper has developed a practical and constructive framework that has the potential to inform both policy and further theoretical development on collaboration in VBHC.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Jonathan C. Morris

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within…

Abstract

Looks at the 2000 Employment Research Unit Annual Conference held at the University of Cardiff in Wales on 6/7 September 2000. Spotlights the 76 or so presentations within and shows that these are in many, differing, areas across management research from: retail finance; precarious jobs and decisions; methodological lessons from feminism; call centre experience and disability discrimination. These and all points east and west are covered and laid out in a simple, abstract style, including, where applicable, references, endnotes and bibliography in an easy‐to‐follow manner. Summarizes each paper and also gives conclusions where needed, in a comfortable modern format.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 23 no. 9/10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1941

A standard wholemeal loaf is now on sale. It is made of flour of 85 per cent. extraction, and the Ministry of Food has arranged with the millers and bakers for the…

Abstract

A standard wholemeal loaf is now on sale. It is made of flour of 85 per cent. extraction, and the Ministry of Food has arranged with the millers and bakers for the immediate production of both flour and bread in quantities sufficient, it is hoped, to meet all demands. The 85 per cent. extraction of this new national wholemeal flour compares with a figure of 73 per cent. for ordinary white flour, and the new flour will produce a more nutritious loaf. The Ministry of Food is satisfied after research by its experts that 85 per cent. extraction flour provides maximum digestibility and nutriment. Steps will be taken to see that the new bread is available everywhere, and at the same price as white bread. This is now 8d. a 4lb. loaf, and the Government are making a subsidy so that the price shall be kept at this figure. So far, although nearly three months have passed since it was decided to grant the subsidy, the bakers have not received it ; but agreement on the scheme has now been reached between them and the Ministry, which states that an early announcement will be made. Special breads, such as those containing more fat, which are popular in the North, may be sold for more than 8d., but these do not then qualify for the subsidy. The decision to make a standard wholemeal loaf and wholemeal flour available in large supply was taken because it was found that a substantial proportion of the population wanted them. Existing brown breads vary enormously ; the new loaf will be a standard product. Meanwhile, the Ministry is going ahead with its scheme for introducing flour reinforced with manufactured vitamin B1, but this will not be available for some months.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Paul Blyton, Edmund Heery and Peter Turnbull

Presents 35 abstracts from the 2001 Employment Research Unit Annual conference held at Cardiff Business School in September 2001. Attempts to explore the theme of changing…

Abstract

Presents 35 abstracts from the 2001 Employment Research Unit Annual conference held at Cardiff Business School in September 2001. Attempts to explore the theme of changing politics of employment relations beyond and within the nation state, against a background of concern in the developed economies at the erosion of relatively advanced conditions of work and social welfare through increasing competition and international agitation for more effective global labour standards. Divides this concept into two areas, addressing the erosion of employment standards through processes of restructuring and examining attempts by governments, trade unions and agencies to re‐create effective systems of regulation. Gives case examples from areas such as India, Wales, London, Ireland, South Africa, Europe and Japan. Covers subjects such as the Disability Discrimination Act, minimum wage, training, contract workers and managing change.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 24 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Gareth Monkman

A report on the 1992 Finish Robotics conference in Helsinki. Areascovered include medical robotics, advanced flexible robotic systems for smallbatch manufacturing…

Abstract

A report on the 1992 Finish Robotics conference in Helsinki. Areas covered include medical robotics, advanced flexible robotic systems for small batch manufacturing, automated laboratory systems and waste disposal systems.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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