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Article
Publication date: 4 August 2020

Changbin Wang

The purpose of this paper is to review Macao's gaming regulation from 2001, when competition was introduced into the gaming market, to the present and discuss the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review Macao's gaming regulation from 2001, when competition was introduced into the gaming market, to the present and discuss the potential methods to improve the regulatory system in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts the qualitative approach, investigating and studying the contents, changes and enforcement of the gaming legislations.

Findings

The gaming regulation in Macao has made great progress in the past two decades. Before 2001, the gaming market was monopolized, and the gaming regulation was merely a concession system. Law No. 16/2001, together with the other laws and regulations promulgated later, established a regulatory framework containing rules of suitability check, casino entry, competition, internal control, gaming promotion, credit gaming and antimoney laundering. The implementation of the rules has also drawn attention of the international community.

Originality/value

This paper reviews the gaming regulation in Macao in all its major aspects for the first time and argues that a framework of gaming regulation has been established in Macao although it needs to be improved.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 August 2020

Carlos Siu Lam

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the evolution of Macao's gaming credit practices with reference to its promulgation of the gaming credit law after its gaming

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the evolution of Macao's gaming credit practices with reference to its promulgation of the gaming credit law after its gaming liberalization.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach based on in-depth interviews with casino executives, government officials and gamblers to probe their perspectives on Macao's gaming credit practices was adopted due to its underresearched nature. Documentary analysis of annual reports and court files was also used.

Findings

Despite the potential of increased revenue with more credit, the credit risk for gaming concessionaires remained under control, while VIP-rooms and junket operators have adopted more prudent policy and faced substantial challenge in credit collection. All these would lead to greater alignment with law-based credit practices.

Research limitations/implications

Since gaming credit information was considered confidential, the author experienced difficulty in arranging the interviews, and the nonprobability sampling characterized by the selection bias might affect the findings.

Practical implications

The findings have demonstrated some major credit practices such as credit charges on credit balances and terms and conditions for repayment for different credit providers in Macao.

Originality/value

The different credit practices by credit providers at different levels of gaming credit have been presented in the same paper.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Hong Wai Ho

The purpose of this paper is to examine the casino development and regulation in Macau and Singapore. The paper also seeks to assess the potential for casino development…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the casino development and regulation in Macau and Singapore. The paper also seeks to assess the potential for casino development in Asia, with a particular focus on the prospects of Japan's casino resorts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the gaming history, gaming/tourism policies and casino regulations of Macau and Singapore. The key aspects concerned with the casino development in Asia are also examined.

Findings

The paper identifies the fundamentals that have contributed to the prosperity of casino resorts in Macau and Singapore, as well as highlights the potential and challenges for the casino developments in Japan and other Asian destinations.

Research limitations/implications

A number of legal and tourism-related factors are identified to be the determinants of casino development. However, more research is needed to examine the political, economic and socio-cultural factors associated with casino gaming.

Practical implications

The paper, discussing the casino development and regulation in Macau and Singapore, provides practical implications for the design of gaming/tourism policy and casino control in Japan and other prospective gaming jurisdictions.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the growing body of literature on the gaming law and casino development in Asia and provides insights for policymakers contemplating the adoption of casinos as a strategic policy for tourism development and economic growth.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Susan C. Awe, Kathleen Keating and David G. Schwartz

The potential for substantial revenues from gaming has moved gambling from an underworld activity to a legitimate mainstream business. This selective list of portals, Web…

Abstract

The potential for substantial revenues from gaming has moved gambling from an underworld activity to a legitimate mainstream business. This selective list of portals, Web sites, and print resources is intended to guide local communities, librarians, and researchers to a variety of sources (statistics, regulations, history, and industry trends) focused on the business of gaming.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Aaron Cunningham and Brian H. Kleiner

Nevada and Atlantic City, New Jersey dominated the Gaming Industry until 1989. Since their inception, they have discriminated against minorities, especially African…

Abstract

Nevada and Atlantic City, New Jersey dominated the Gaming Industry until 1989. Since their inception, they have discriminated against minorities, especially African Americans. Casinos even discriminate against people who seem to have better than average luck. These people are referred to as card counters or proficient players. In 1989, Indian Reservations around the United States started opening casinos on Indian Reservations even if the state where the Indian Reservation resided prohibited gambling. With these “new casinos” (referred to as Indian owned casinos) came new discriminations from the states in the United States and from the United States government. Currently, there are different rules for each type of casino. Indian owned casinos have very few laws or rules that they must follow. Non‐Indian owned casinos have state laws and gaming laws that they must follow in order to have a gaming licence.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 22 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2014

Aimee L. Franklin

From 1995 to 2011, tribal gaming has grown from $5.5B to $27.2B in revenues (NIGC website, 2012). When so much money is changing hands, a lack of adequate policies…

Abstract

From 1995 to 2011, tribal gaming has grown from $5.5B to $27.2B in revenues (NIGC website, 2012). When so much money is changing hands, a lack of adequate policies heightens the possibility of financial mismanagement. In fact, gaming violations have grown during this time period. This paper explores the relationship between financial management policies and regulatory violations among American Indian Tribal gaming activities. Through empirical testing, we conclude that deductive models of proactive and reactive policies do not accurately predict the incidence of gaming violations and these policies are ineffective. The results raise normative questions about regulatory policy parity. These findings and related implications for future financial management regulations, policies and practices are tremendous, given the amount of money involved.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

John Bowen

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the barriers to casino development, asking how they can be minimized, and how might casino resorts drive tourism growth most…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the barriers to casino development, asking how they can be minimized, and how might casino resorts drive tourism growth most effectively?

Design/methodology/approach

An extensive review of literature on casino development is reviewed and analyzed.

Findings

This paper supports the proposition that casinos can be used to provide attractions that will benefit tourism destinations.

Practical implications

This paper provides useful insights for tourism planning, governmental management of gaming jurisdictions, and gaming executives on the social costs and benefits of gaming. The paper focuses on how to reduce the social costs and maximize the value created by the economic benefits.

Originality/value

The author proposes a model where future casino development should be required to support other entertainment options, such as live entertainment and restaurants at tourism destinations.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Matthew Simon

Information brokerages are operated by entrepreneurs or under the aegis of larger organizations. The UNLV library has established two such services. In spite of careful…

Abstract

Information brokerages are operated by entrepreneurs or under the aegis of larger organizations. The UNLV library has established two such services. In spite of careful planning and a demand for business and legal information, the first venture was unsuccessful. The second venture is doing very well. An examination of these two cases provides lessons for future endeavors.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2012

Shima D. Keene

The purpose of this paper is to highlight emerging threats in cyberspace, with particular reference to financial crime in the virtual world, which have real life…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight emerging threats in cyberspace, with particular reference to financial crime in the virtual world, which have real life implications, as well as to recommend ways in which the threat may be mitigated.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted consisted of an extensive literature review on topics to include cyber crime, virtual worlds, and financial crime.

Findings

Virtual worlds such as Second Life play a key role in supporting real world activities such as education, training and business and as such, should not be dismissed purely as a “gaming” environment. In addition, emerging technologies coupled with the lack of legislation and regulation within virtual worlds has created an environment where a variety of crimes can be committed without fear of detection or prosecution. A further concern is its use by criminals as a vehicle to mask real life crimes such as fraud, identify theft and money laundering. The question is to what extent the blurring of the virtual and real life environments can be clarified in order to minimise the risk of abuse of virtual environments by criminal elements, which have direct consequences in the real world.

Originality/value

This paper serves as a useful guide to alert and educate security professionals, the judiciary, law enforcement and policy makers of the significance and the extent of the use of “virtual” environments in cyberspace for criminal means, such as fraud and money laundering. Findings are supported by a conclusion which includes recommendations for tackling these issues.

Details

Journal of Money Laundering Control, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-5201

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1970

J.L. HALL, JOHN PALMER and J.B. POOLE

Details are given of an experimental information service sponsored by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information through its Documentation Processing Centre as…

Abstract

Details are given of an experimental information service sponsored by the Office for Scientific and Technical Information through its Documentation Processing Centre as part of a programme to test the suitability of established computer techniques in the field of the social sciences. In the period 30 October to 20 December 1968, 4,500 index entries for material in the public policy area of British domestic affairs were prepared in the House of Commons Library and computer‐processed and printed by the Culham Laboratory of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. Weekly Current Literature Bulletins were produced in thirty‐six subject fields and distributed to participants (over four hundred Members of Parliament and about one hundred others) according to their expressed interests. A large majority of the MPs who answered a questionnaire said that they would like to see a permanent service on similar lines. Regular machine‐produced cumulations of all or part of the input over a period could be a feature of such a service.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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