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Abstract

Game-based learning or simulation-based learning – especially Serious Games – are notions of the contemporary discourse on digitalisation in the higher education sector in Germany. These methods offer a more vivid and motivating learning context and they help to improve important competencies for reaching work-related higher education goals. This explorative study focuses on experts’ experiences with digital and non-digital serious games and their contribution towards developing self, social and management competencies, in the Bundeswehr Command and Staff College in Hamburg (Germany). Whilst there are numerous opportunities for using serious games in higher education, their use creates barriers for addressing social, as well as leadership/management competencies. In the future, game-based learning – and more specifically, digital game-based learning – could challenge the relation between learning as hard work and learn for fun, and between explicit and goal-oriented learning and implicit, incidental and explorative learning.

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Chanin Ballance

The purpose of this article is to introduce the benefits of game‐based learning in the corporate business environment. Corporations and other organizations around the

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1329

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to introduce the benefits of game‐based learning in the corporate business environment. Corporations and other organizations around the world are recognizing that games promote cognitive reasoning and information retention. These days, games are much more advanced, immersive and engaging.

Design/methodology/approach

VIA Learning works with global Fortune 500 companies. The article is based on customer needs and technical expertise of VIA Learning instructional designers.

Findings

Game‐based learning is a viable option for global businesses.

Originality/value

The article introduces the benefits of game‐based learning in the corporate business environment.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Danielle Herro and Rebecca Clark

This paper aims to address opportunities and tensions when creating game-based learning practices in higher education. By detailing examples from a university in the…

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1089

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to address opportunities and tensions when creating game-based learning practices in higher education. By detailing examples from a university in the Southeastern USA and the communities it serves, we suggest game-based research and learning be approached as a unifying influence adaptable across contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

We use a working example methodology where someone with expertise “works through” a well-known issue while making the thinking overt. In this manner, we reveal processes, successes and challenges infusing game-based learning in higher education to deepen understanding between fields and encourage research and practice with games across disciplines.

Findings

The working example demonstrates that games served as a unifying influence in three primary ways, which included redesigning courses and implementing programmatic changes; using existing programs to promote interdisciplinary teaching and research; and increasing outreach and partnerships. In each example, games served to strengthen or support the initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper extends literature on the value of games to promote research and learning. Significantly, it provides an example for others in game-based learning fields to consider when building similar programs in higher education.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Bee Lan Oo and Benson Teck-Heng Lim

The game-based learning has been used very successfully in some areas of formal education. In construction management, there is an increased uptake of games in teaching…

Abstract

Purpose

The game-based learning has been used very successfully in some areas of formal education. In construction management, there is an increased uptake of games in teaching and learning. Focusing on a bidding game, the purpose of this paper is to evaluate its ability in enhancing students’ learning. The specific objectives are to: examine the effectiveness of the game as a teaching mechanism; explore students’ learning experience, preference and motivation to participate in the game; and identify the relationship between game features and students’ learning experience and overall satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopted a survey research design. A questionnaire survey was conducted in two universities in Australia, involving 100 students in the gameplay.

Findings

The results show that the overall student feedback is positive with the vast majority of the students enjoying the learning experience. Students from both institutions have indicated their preference for group-based game sessions. However, the students have divergent opinions about the game incentive and motivation. It is found that there are significant correlations between some of the game features and students’ learning experience and overall satisfaction.

Practical implications

The bidding game clearly has potential for adaptation in construction bidding-related courses. Educators could consider incorporating the significant game features towards improving students’ learning experience and overall satisfaction.

Originality/value

Given there are limited studies that aimed at evaluating educational games, the student feedback in this research should facilitate more critical and reflective process for incorporating similar form of games in teaching construction management and bidding-related courses.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2018

Tien-Yu Hsu, HsinYi Liang, Chuang-Kai Chiou and Judy C.R. Tseng

The purpose of this paper is to develop a blended mobile game-based learning service called CoboChild Mobile Exploration Service (hereinafter CoboChild) to support…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a blended mobile game-based learning service called CoboChild Mobile Exploration Service (hereinafter CoboChild) to support children’s learning in an environment blending virtual game worlds and a museum’s physical space. The contextual model of learning (CML) was applied to consider the related influential factors affecting museum learning and to promote children’s continuous learning and revisit motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

CoboChild provides a thematic game-based learning environment to facilitate children’s interactions with exhibits and other visitors. A practical system has been implemented in the National Museum of Natural Science (NMNS), Taiwan. A questionnaire was used to examine whether CoboChild can effectively fulfill the CML and to evaluate the impacts on museum learning.

Findings

CoboChild effectively fulfilled the CML to facilitate children’s interactive experiences and re-visit motivations in the blended mobile game-based learning environment. Most children described the system as providing fruitful playfulness while improving their interpretations of exhibitions and learning experiences.

Practical implications

CoboChild considers the related contextual influences on the effective support of children’s learning in a museum, and builds a child-centered museum learning environment with highly integrated blended learning resources for children. CoboChild has been successfully operating in the NMNS since 2011.

Originality/value

This study developed a blended mobile game-based learning service to effectively support children’s learning in museum contexts. The related issues are shown to improve the design of blended museum learning services. This innovative approach can be applied to the design of other child-centered services for engaging children’s interactive experiences in museums.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Michael Joseph Figuccio and Marla Johnston

Kahoot! is a free e-learning tool that employs game-based learning which is often considered a best practice in education. The aim of the current study is to assess the…

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126

Abstract

Purpose

Kahoot! is a free e-learning tool that employs game-based learning which is often considered a best practice in education. The aim of the current study is to assess the effectiveness of Kahoot! in a child development course.

Design/methodology/approach

Sections of child development were randomized in terms of review format prior to exams one and two. All sections had a Kahoot! review prior to the final exam. Regression analyses were employed to determine the optimal set of predictors of exam scores. Students also completed a survey assessing their opinions of Kahoot! reviews.

Findings

Kahoot! scores accounted for 31.3% of the variability in exam 1 scores, 11.1% of the variability in exam 2 scores and 19.9% of the variability in final exam scores. Students reported that Kahoot! made class more interactive and that Kahoot! helped their learning of course concepts. These findings indicate that Kahoot! is an effective review tool. Furthermore, students reported that the use of Kahoot! was a positive experience that added to their understanding of the topics taught in the child development classroom.

Practical implications

To foster student engagement, instructors should consider incorporating game-based learning in their courses.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates that Kahoot! is an effective review tool in a sample of undergraduate students. Furthermore, this study indicates that Kahoot! promotes student engagement.

Details

Journal of Research in Innovative Teaching & Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2397-7604

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Jeffrey B. Holmes and Elisabeth R. Gee

– This paper aims to provide a framework for understanding and differentiating among different forms of game-based teaching and learning (GBTL).

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6548

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a framework for understanding and differentiating among different forms of game-based teaching and learning (GBTL).

Design/methodology/approach

The framework is based on an analysis of existing literature and descriptions of GBTL in varied higher education settings, combined with case examples of the author’s personal experience as instructors of GBTL courses.

Findings

Four frames or categories of GBTL approaches were identified: the action frame, the structuring frame, the bridging frame and the design frame. Each frame represents a spectrum of related yet varied strategies and assumptions.

Originality/value

This framework is a first attempt at providing an analytic tool for making sense of the varied instantiations of GBTL in higher education. It can be useful as a heuristic tool for researchers as well as a generative model for designing future GBTL practices.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Jeremiah Isaac Holden

This study aims to describe the feasibility of designing and fostering pre-service teacher inquiry at the intersection of community and disciplinary engagement. Mapping My…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to describe the feasibility of designing and fostering pre-service teacher inquiry at the intersection of community and disciplinary engagement. Mapping My Math (MMM), a game-based and mobile learning activity, guided pre-service teachers in playfully exploring mathematics featured in the everyday activities of people and places and creatively representing this inquiry with digital media.

Design/methodology/approach

This study draws from design-based research that examined the role of place, digital media and mobility in mathematics teacher education. Design narrative methods describe how MMM was created, implemented and refined to support disciplinary inquiry across settings given the evolution of tools, activities and practices. The study and design narrative address the following question: How can game-based and mobile learning be designed to support pre-service teachers’ disciplinary inquiry of everyday mathematics?

Findings

Findings shared in this study’s design narrative attend to the quality of pre-service teachers’ inquiry-as-play, or expressive mobility situated amonglearners’ social and material relations, disciplinary concepts and the built environment.

Research limitations/implications

Implications from this study concern the role of mobile learning in mathematics teacher education to connect school, community and online settings; the potential of gameful design to impact pre-service teacher learning across settings; and the importance of fostering disciplinary inquiry whereby pre-service teachers can “navigate” their own learning.

Originality/value

Game-based and mobile learning designs, like MMM, can create the conditions for cross-setting mobility as generative of inquiry-as-play in mathematics teacher education. MMM encouraged pre-service teachers to playfully leverage disciplinary practices that shaped new relationships with mathematics, their city and the mathematics of place and community.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Cheryl Pendry Keener

Instructional design students’ training may not include game-based learning (GBL). This paper aims to review the literature on GBL to determine the role of the…

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1024

Abstract

Purpose

Instructional design students’ training may not include game-based learning (GBL). This paper aims to review the literature on GBL to determine the role of the instructional designer who is interested in GBL approaches to enhance learning especially for the novice learner.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for determining the instructional designers’ roles is based on the comparison of game-based and traditional instructional design and the identification of what is needed to aid instructors and designers in development and evaluation of GBL products.

Findings

The literature reveals that GBL shows learning potential. The existence of slim empirical research cannot posit GBL effectiveness in general, within specific disciplines, or with specific learner types. If GBL is to be effectively included in instructional design, the instructional designers, game designers and educational stakeholders need to collaborate to understand and combine optimal design features that meet both game and education objectives and to develop a common nomenclature so that research and its findings can be effectively communicated.

Originality/value

This review identifies specific digital game-based strategies that align with the learning goals sought in instructional design, differences between game and instructional design and steps needed for the instructional designer to bridge gaps in knowledge or practice between educators, researchers, game designers and instructional designers. These identifications may aid all GBL stakeholders in development of future GBL.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 11 November 2019

Asmalina Saleh, Cindy E. Hmelo-Silver, Krista D. Glazewski, Bradford Mott, Yuxin Chen, Jonathan P. Rowe and James C. Lester

This paper aims to present a model of collaborative inquiry play: rule-based imaginary situations that provide challenging problems and support agentic multiplayer…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a model of collaborative inquiry play: rule-based imaginary situations that provide challenging problems and support agentic multiplayer interactions (c.f., Vygotsky, 1967; Salen and Zimmerman, 2003). Drawing on problem-based learning (PBL, Hmelo-Silver, 2004), this paper provides a design case to articulate the relationship between the design goals and the game-based learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on conjecture mapping (Sandoval, 2014), this paper presents an iterative development of the conjecture map for crystal island: ecojourneys and highlights the development of the story and tools in crystal island: ecojourneys, an immersive game based on PBL pedagogy. By articulating this development, the authors highlight the affordances and constraints of designing for collaborative inquiry play and address challenges in supporting learner agency.

Findings

The PBL inquiry process served as the foundation of collaborative inquiry play. Attending to the rules of inquiry fostered student agency, and in turn, playful engagement in the game-based learning environment. Agency however meant holding students accountable to actions undertaken, especially as it pertained to generating group-based explanations and reflecting on productive collaboration. Moreover, socially shared regulation of learning and systems thinking concepts (i.e. phenomenon, mechanisms, and components) must also be externalized in representations and interactions in the game such that students have the agency to decide on their learning paths.

Originality/value

This paper presents the model of collaborative inquiry play and highlights how to support player agency and design content-rich play environments which are not always completely open.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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