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Article

Francisco Szekely and Heidi Strebel

This article was developed to provide a viewpoint for the 10th Annual EABIS Colloquium on Strategic Innovation for Sustainability held at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland on

Abstract

Purpose

This article was developed to provide a viewpoint for the 10th Annual EABIS Colloquium on Strategic Innovation for Sustainability held at IMD in Lausanne, Switzerland on 3-4 July 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors present a framework of three practices that must be applied to an ever-increasing degree along the spectrum of strategic innovation for sustainability.

Findings

To reap the benefits of innovation for sustainability, businesses need to adapt the type of innovation they aim for to their particular context. Three practices are crucial to the innovation process – i.e. an integrated approach, multiple partnerships and visionary leadership from the top. These practices address two of the main challenges companies face in innovating for sustainability, namely actively engaging with the wider dynamic context in which they operate, and spanning boundaries they are not used to crossing.

Practical implications

By analysing the specific context in which a business operates, it is possible to form a better idea of where on the spectrum a particular company may focus its efforts in order to have the greatest chances of success.

Social implications

The analyses in this paper contribute to the debate and practical realisation of sustainable development.

Originality/value

While many studies distinguish between continuous versus discontinuous change as the two ends on a spectrum, the authors extend the spectrum to include three major points from incremental to radical to game-changing systemic innovation for sustainability. The three critical practices must be applied to an ever-increasing degree along the spectrum.

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Executive summary

TUNISIA: Populist-Islamist thaw could be game-changing

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES247781

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article

Eduardo Plastino and Mark Purdy

The article shares the results of a survey Accenture undertook to measure AI’s potential economic impact on 16 industries.

Abstract

Purpose

The article shares the results of a survey Accenture undertook to measure AI’s potential economic impact on 16 industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The goal was to understand the chief reasons for AI’s potential impact and to identify a set of strategies that companies in any industry can use to benefit from advances in AI technologies.

Findings

AI’s unique characteristics as a capital–labor hybrid, which confers the ability to augment human labor at scale and speed, self-learn and continuously improve over time—will require organizations to adopt new approaches and models in a variety of functional areas.

Practical implications

AI can augment labor productivity by taking on low value-added or supporting tasks and thus enable workers to focus on high value work. Bosch has adopted a “thinking factory” approach in one of its German automotive plants…to enable AI-powered machines to self-diagnose technical failures, order replacement parts autonomously and anticipate maintenance needs.

Originality/value

All industries studied stand to benefit from AI, though three -- information and communication, manufacturing and financial services sectors -- will likely realize the biggest gains. Businesses in every industry will need to consider AI as a potential change agent in their investment, innovation and human capital development strategies. To prepare their organizations for a successful future with AI, business leaders should adopt eight strategies.

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Article

Stephen Denning

The paper aims to identify the lessons CEOs of large established organizations need to learn to make continuous innovation a part of the firm's DNA. Instead of innovation

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to identify the lessons CEOs of large established organizations need to learn to make continuous innovation a part of the firm's DNA. Instead of innovation and organizational learning being the responsibility of a few iconoclastic, courageous and rare individuals or departments, it needs to become institutionalized as an organization‐wide capability.

Design/methodology/approach

The author has drafted a lesson plan for top managers based on the best practice suggestions for introducing and fostering an innovation culture – pull management, authentic and interactive communication and putting the customer value zone at the center of the organization.

Findings

Pull management poses the complex challenge of delivering steadily increasing value to customers and engaging employees and customers in conversations. This is a radically different business environment. It requires understanding and mastering a radically different kind of management.

Practical implications

The management lesson plan: learn the skills required to practice pull management, authentic and interactive communication and putting the customer value zone at the center of the organization.

Originality/value

The paper postulates that organization‐wide continuous innovation, which will be vital to survival in the coming years, requires a radically new approach to management and the learning of a completely new set of skills.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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Article

Kazunori Suzuki, Katsuyuki Tochimoto and Kazuhito Isomura

This paper aims to clarify how to start up and establish a new business by developing, combining and utilizing strategic resources and capabilities.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify how to start up and establish a new business by developing, combining and utilizing strategic resources and capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper studies the case of Park24 by examining how it created a market, changed the way to compete in the market and utilized its business model effectively to enter a new business.

Findings

The paper finds that Park24 has become a leading company in its core business by developing its new development staff, its parking sites nationwide, its brand and its IT system, and that it has built a profitable business model and successfully entered the car sharing business by making good use of that business model.

Originality/value

The case study suggests that Park24 started and developed its core business by accumulating strategic resources and capabilities and establishing a profitable business model, and that it utilized this business model effectively to dominate the market shortly after entering.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

Michael Solomon and Rishon Blumberg

Why building out a fleet of freelance talent could be the reason some companies survive to see 2021, while their competitors do not.

Abstract

Purpose

Why building out a fleet of freelance talent could be the reason some companies survive to see 2021, while their competitors do not.

Design/methodology/approach

Authors drew upon their experience as cofounders of 10x Management and their experience in the talent management field.

Findings

If you are not so sure if freelance talent could be game changing for your company, consider that experimentation is a key element of staying nimble. Companies tend to layoff staff, pause raises and scale back the office lease as initial reactions to reduce costs and stay lean. But the ones that do it the best go the extra mile. It is not just about cutting costs – rather, it is about doubling down on new (and old) ways to achieve peak performance in the face of uncertainty. Using freelancers can do just that.

Research limitations/implications

There are five number of ways in which freelance workers benefit a company, including speed, adaptability, cost, low commitment and remote expertise.

Originality/value

The findings will help companies stay nimble in the midst of crises such as the current pandemic.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Book part

David L. Cooperrider

The emergence of strengths-based management may be the management innovation of our time. Nearly every organization has been introduced to its precepts – for example, the…

Abstract

The emergence of strengths-based management may be the management innovation of our time. Nearly every organization has been introduced to its precepts – for example, the insight that a person or organization will excel only by amplifying strengths, never by simply fixing weaknesses. But in spite of impressive returns, organizations and managers have almost all stopped short of the breakthroughs that are possible. With micro tools largely in place, the future of strengths management is moving increasingly to the macro-management level, as witnessed in the rapid and far-reaching use of large group methods such as the Appreciative Inquiry Summit and its next generation design-thinking summit. Macro means whole and, by definition, unites many improbable opposites – for example, it embraces top down and bottom up simultaneously. It is a prime time source of organizational generativity. But the rules of macro-management are different than any other kind, most certainly micro-management. A decade of research and successful prototyping with single organizations, regions and cities, extended enterprises, industries, and UN-level world summits reveals five “X” factors – a specific set of mutually reinforcing elements of success and organizational generativity – and provides a clear set of guidelines for when and how you can deploy the “whole system in the room” design summit to bring out the best in system collaboration. By analyzing the performance and impacts of six case studies of the “whole system in the room” Appreciative Inquiry design summit, this chapter provides a bird’s eye view of the opportunities, challenges, and exciting new vistas opening up in this the collaborative age – a time when systemic action and macro-management skill are the primary leverage points for game-changing innovation, scalable solutions, and generative organizing. The chapter concludes with a call for more research into the stages of large group dynamics and advances a metaphor from the leadership literature – the spark, the flame, and the torch – to give imagery to the “positive contagion” and “the concentration effect of strengths” that happens during an Appreciative Inquiry Summit where 100s and sometimes 1000s come together interactively and collaboratively to design the future.

Details

Organizational Generativity: The Appreciative Inquiry Summit and a Scholarship of Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-330-8

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Article

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

New phenomena come and go on a frequent basis. But every now and then something with true game‐changing potential comes to the fore. The business world is rarely immune to any reverberations that ensue. Few would argue that social networking is the latest addition to this category. The unrelenting global expansion of Facebook and Twitter is testimony to that fact. User numbers for these platforms alone are now measured in hundreds of millions. As a result, massive scope exists for organizations to exploit social media as a means of productively engaging with consumers. Given the size of the captive audience, many firms have not surprisingly jumped on the social networking bandwagon. A fear of being left behind is also a motivating factor. However, simply establishing a presence on key sites provides no guarantee of success. Making it fruitful demands significant effort on a company's part, together with the realization that traditional approaches to customer relationship management (CRM) are all but redundant in this online world.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

What is your view of technology in your business? Is it geeky iPhone obsessives swapping apps? Pain in the neck IT guys always blocking the progress of key projects? Or the sickening moment when you see how a competitor has moved forward with some new innovation? Whatever your view, the term “IT” often has negative connotations in a corporate context, yet when it is harnessed it is the one game‐changing facet of a firm's armory.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that can have a broader social impact.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article

This article aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

The briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Think innovation and to many firms it is high cost and even higher risk that pays off infrequently at best. Indeed, the record books show that far more ideas end up on the scrapheap than lead to commercial success. With failure seemingly almost inevitable, why do companies invest so much into striving for those game‐changing breakthroughs? Essentially, they have no choice. Faced with tough competition on an increasingly global scale, organizations which give innovation activities a wide berth will invariably end up among the also‐rans.

Practical implications

The article provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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