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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2000

John Kirriemuir

The games console, within the wider sector of electronic games and entertainment, is defined. A historical outline of the games console is given, indicating how the…

Abstract

The games console, within the wider sector of electronic games and entertainment, is defined. A historical outline of the games console is given, indicating how the development of the console, and that of the PC, have intertwined over several decades. The emerging generation of games consoles possesses facilities that offer the possibility of access to networked resources, such as electronic library services, at a fraction of the cost of PC hardware. The Electronic Library and the increase in home‐based network access are discussed. Observations are then drawn from the use of a games console to interact with specific network‐based components of the “electronic library”. Alternative emerging modes of Internet and Network‐based access are touched upon. Aspects of game console usage within the library sector are considered and future developments of gaming and console technology, especially as applied to Network‐based service and resource access, are speculated upon.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 18 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 12 January 2015

Makoto Kimura

The purpose of this paper is to examine the respective effects of advertising, word of mouth (operationalized as “tweets” on Twitter), and serialization on sales of console

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the respective effects of advertising, word of mouth (operationalized as “tweets” on Twitter), and serialization on sales of console game series in Japan.

Design/methodology/approach

To do this, the author classified console game series into four categories on the basis of their sales, identified a singular case that corresponds to each category, and presented a performance calculation model that approximates variation in sales for the first and second titles of each series.

Findings

Coupled with the results generated by the performance models a comparison of each game series showed that although word-of-mouth and backward serialization may influence sales performance for the first title in a console game series, sales of the second title in the series were most heavily influenced by forward serialization and advertising. The author further found that word-of-mouth via social networks was unlikely to affect the sales performance of a series’ second title.

Research limitations/implications

The sales of first title video game console series permit the forecasting and evaluation of the sales’ second title performance through the performance calculation model incorporating the advertising, word-of-mouth, and serialization effect and vice versa.

Originality/value

Taken together, these results demonstrate that the affordances of social networking can be used to improve sales performance for the first title in a series, and the use of backward serialization for subsequent titles could incite the purchase of over a million copies of the game(s).

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Neal J. Roese and Evan Meagher

On April 4, 2013, a video game website reported that the next-generation Xbox console—due to be released by Microsoft the following month—would require an always-on…

Abstract

On April 4, 2013, a video game website reported that the next-generation Xbox console—due to be released by Microsoft the following month—would require an always-on Internet connection in order to operate. The new version of the SimCity game that had been released earlier that year with an always-on requirement had been a disaster. Hardcore gamers reacted negatively to the news.

When the Xbox One console was officially revealed on May 21, Microsoft effectively confirmed that it would require an always-on connection for validating digital rights. Predictably, gamers reacted negatively, a response that was exacerbated when Microsoft's president of the interactive entertainment business, Don Mattrick, made dismissive statements about their concerns

After reading and analyzing the case, students will be able to:

  • Address the challenge of marketing a product to multiple adjacent but very different customer segments

  • Understand the need for a unified vision before going to market

  • Develop a strategy that addresses the complexity of a world in which the company may no longer own the “loudest voice in the room”

Address the challenge of marketing a product to multiple adjacent but very different customer segments

Understand the need for a unified vision before going to market

Develop a strategy that addresses the complexity of a world in which the company may no longer own the “loudest voice in the room”

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Ryan Cassidy and Matthew McEniry

– This two-part study aims to expose the challenges and establish the necessity of preserving digital content, with a focus on console video games.

Abstract

Purpose

This two-part study aims to expose the challenges and establish the necessity of preserving digital content, with a focus on console video games.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a method of establishing the history of video game consoles, identifying the challenges presented by the format and addressing the current preservation efforts, this article serves as a brief retrospective of the issues and a guide to extending the conversation.

Findings

Representing a unique format, heavily reliant on advances in technological and industrial standards, console video games have experienced a demonstrated lack of preservation.

Originality/value

With special attention to the non-gamer, this is an introduction to the conversation and an invitation to lend expertise to not only an often overlooked area of popular culture, which is facing (and in some cases, has experienced) irretrievable loss of information, but also to other formats facing adjustment to the digital, always-online environment.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

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Abstract

Subject area

CSS 11: Strategy

Study level/applicability

Undergraduate or Graduate Capstone Course in Management or Marketing.

Case overview

Electronic Arts is one of the premiere video game software developers in the world. With the changing video game industry, evolving tastes and preferences, the introduction of next generation platforms and supporting various mobile platforms, Electronics Arts has important decisions to make as it charts its future.

Expected learning outcomes

The analysis seeks to fulfil several objectives relevant to management and marketing strategy courses, where analysis of the external environment of a firm is important. Students should be able to do the following: identify the relevant content to include in an industry analysis. Understand the key concepts of strategic analysis and how to apply them. Use the analytical tools of strategy to synthesize information from multiple sources into a comprehensive picture of an industry. Provide an overview of the dynamics and near-term future of this industry. Use industry analysis to explore emerging markets, billing options and where to target company resources.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2013

Svend Hollensen

The purpose with this article is to analyze the “Blue Ocean” phenomenon in depth. The goal is to better understand the underlying dynamic strategies in the form of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose with this article is to analyze the “Blue Ocean” phenomenon in depth. The goal is to better understand the underlying dynamic strategies in the form of interactions between theory and management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Single case study, Nintendo, which strategy is being confronted with the strategies of the two competitors, Sony and Microsoft. This is done in order to distinguish the value propositions of the three players in the game console industry

Findings

The main finding is that even if a company can create a Blue Ocean very fast with the right value proposition at the right time, it may be short-termed and may be transformed into a Red Ocean again within 1-2 years, unless the company's competitiveness is safe-guarded.

Practical implications

The results show, that Nintendo started out with a Red Ocean around 2005 with their GameCube. Then they turned it into a Blue Ocean with their introduction of “Wii” in November 2006. But Nintendo could not prevent Sony and Microsoft in turning it back to a Red Ocean, with their introduction of similar product features (motion controls), but at better quality. If Nintendo will be able to reestablish the Blue Ocean with their introduction of the “Wii U” in November 2012 is questionable.

Originality/value

There is constantly a need for reformulating the strategy through a dynamic and creative process, in order not to turn the Blue Ocean into a Red Ocean again.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Tripat Gill, Zhenfeng Ma, Ping Zhao and Yongjian (Ken) Chen

This study aims to distinguish between the indispensable (software) versus discretionary (accessories) complementary products to a platform. It investigates the impact of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to distinguish between the indispensable (software) versus discretionary (accessories) complementary products to a platform. It investigates the impact of accessories on increasing the perceived value and sales of a base platform. In particular, the role of two distinct characteristics of accessories – innovativeness and structural nonalignability – in driving the sales of the base platform.

Design/methodology/approach

Combining sales data from the US video gaming industry with primary data on the above two aspects of accessories, this study quantifies the effect of accessories portfolio on the sales of three brands of video gaming platforms.

Findings

A distinct network externality arises from accessories for video gaming platforms, above and beyond the effects of game titles. Importantly, the average level of innovativeness and nonalignability of the accessories portfolio, as well as the frequency of introduction of highly innovative and/or nonalignable accessories positively impact the sales of the platform.

Research limitations/implications

This research seeks to address the gap in the innovation literature on the role of discretionary complementary products (i.e. accessories) on platform sales. Future research should examine this in other platform contexts as well.

Practical implications

Managers of platform-mediated products should give due consideration to accessories, as an important driver of the sales of the platforms. Product managers can leverage the advantage of innovative and nonalignable accessories to enhance consumer demand for the platform.

Originality/value

This study is the first to conceptualize and empirically verify the network externality arising from accessories, a heretofore much neglected component of platform-based markets.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Philip Rosson

The process by which a new shirt sponsorship was struck between SEGA Europe and Arsenal FC is described through a case study. The circumstances leading both organizations…

Abstract

The process by which a new shirt sponsorship was struck between SEGA Europe and Arsenal FC is described through a case study. The circumstances leading both organizations to seek out a sponsorship partner are identified. SEGA Europe was preparing to launch its new Dreamcast video console in Europe and wished to create a high-impact marketing program. Arsenal was looking for a company to replace its former shirt sponsor JVC. The case study also provides information about the sponsorship deal, the first 18 months of the partnership, and draws out some some more general lessons.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Abstract

Details

Videogames, Libraries, and the Feedback Loop: Learning Beyond the Stacks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-505-9

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Elizabeth Tappeiner and Catherine Lyons

This article aims to discuss the relevance of building video game collections in academia to support research and learning on campus and to propose useful criteria for…

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to discuss the relevance of building video game collections in academia to support research and learning on campus and to propose useful criteria for building video game collections in academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined collection development policies of selected academic libraries as well as research discussing the cultural, historical, and educational value of video games. The authors also examined video game playback devices, games and their packaging, and popular game web sites.

Findings

The authors outline selection considerations for developing video game collections and propose the following criteria for selecting games: physical characteristics, teaching and learning principles present in the games, subject matter and content, and the cultural and historical value of a game.

Originality/value

Establishing video games in libraries is not a new topic, but most discussions have been focused on public libraries or the entertainment value of video games in academic libraries. This article focuses on games as serious objects of study in academia and provides best practices for video games collections development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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