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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Galit Meisler

This study advances our knowledge about counternormative emotion management processes utilized in organizations. We investigate a research model in which managerial…

Abstract

Purpose

This study advances our knowledge about counternormative emotion management processes utilized in organizations. We investigate a research model in which managerial intimidation, and more specifically subordinates' perceptions about it, evokes fear, which reduces their job satisfaction and increases their turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

The model was tested using two samples, one from the public sector and the other from the private sector. The data were collected in three waves using questionnaires.

Findings

Our findings validated the research model in the public sector alone, revealing sectorial differences regarding the destructive emotional and attitudinal implications of perceived managerial intimidation.

Originality/value

The current study sheds light on counternormative emotion management processes utilized in organizations, a topic we know little about. Furthermore, it advances our knowledge regarding the responses of the targets of impression management attempts, revealing sectorial differences about them. Finally, this study broadens our understanding about intimidation, an under-investigated impression management strategy.

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2020

Galit Meisler

This study investigated whether managers' nonaggressive political behavior can result in negative emotional and attitudinal outcomes such as aggressive behavior and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigated whether managers' nonaggressive political behavior can result in negative emotional and attitudinal outcomes such as aggressive behavior and the role of emotional intelligence (EI) in this context. The authors explored a moderated mediation model in which perceived managerial supplication elicited hostility that increased turnover intentions and the emotional abilities included in EI acted as antidotes to these outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors tested the moderated mediation model using two large samples, one from the public sector and the other from the private sector, providing a cross-sectorial comparison. The authors collected the data for this study in three waves.

Findings

The authors’ findings revealed that the model fit the public sector alone. Moreover, others' emotion appraisal was the only aspect of EI that moderated the hostility and turnover intentions of public servants.

Practical implications

Interventions aimed at increasing the EI level of public servants can be a powerful tool for reducing their hostility and turnover intentions. However, these interventions must focus on all four aspects of EI , particularly others' emotion appraisal.

Originality/value

Managers' nonaggressive political behavior can result in negative emotional and attitudinal outcomes such as aggressive behavior. However, EI reduces these negative outcomes among public servants.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Galit Meisler, Amos Drory and Eran Vigoda-Gadot

The purpose of this paper is to examine hostility as a mediator of the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics (POP) and counterproductive work behavior (CWB).

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2818

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine hostility as a mediator of the relationship between perceptions of organizational politics (POP) and counterproductive work behavior (CWB).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors’ examined the mediation model using a sample of 171 full-time employees studying in an evening MBA program. The authors’ collected the data for this study in three waves.

Findings

The findings supported all of the hypotheses. POP was positively related to both hostility and CWB. Moreover, hostility mediated the relationships between POP and both organizational and interpersonal CWB.

Practical implications

Given that individuals high in emotional intelligence (EI) are better at regulating their negative emotions, EI training may be a powerful tool for reducing the hostility elicited among organizational members in response to POP, and consequently, their engagement in CWB.

Originality/value

The current study uncovered the emotional mechanism that underlies the POP-CWB relationship. The findings have intriguing implications in terms of potential moderators that can be developed through interventions in an attempt to reduce the hostility and CWB that result from POP.

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Galit Meisler, Eran Vigoda-Gadot and Amos Drory

This chapter builds on previous research that conceptualized organizational politics as an organizational stressor. After reviewing the studies that integrated the…

Abstract

This chapter builds on previous research that conceptualized organizational politics as an organizational stressor. After reviewing the studies that integrated the occupational stress literature with the organizational politics literature, it discusses the negative implications of the use of intimidation and pressure by supervisors, implications that have generally been overlooked. Specifically, the chapter presents a conceptual model positing that the use of intimidation and pressure by supervisors creates stress in their subordinates. This stress, in turn, affects subordinates’ well-being, evident in higher levels of job dissatisfaction, job burnout, and turnover intentions. The stress also reduces the effectiveness of the organization, reflected in a high absenteeism rate, poorer task performance, and a decline in organizational citizenship behavior. The model also maintains that individual differences in emotional intelligence and political skill mitigate the stress experienced by subordinates, resulting from the use of intimidation and pressure by their supervisors. In acknowledging the destructive implications of such behavior in terms of employees’ well-being and the productivity of the organization, the chapter raises doubts about the wisdom of using it, and advises supervisors to rethink its use as a motivational tool. Implications of this chapter, as well as future research directions, are discussed.

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Galit Meisler and Eran Vigoda-Gadot

This study aims to examine the relationship between perceived organizational politics and emotional intelligence, and their interplay in the context of work…

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4947

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between perceived organizational politics and emotional intelligence, and their interplay in the context of work attitudes/behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 368 employees was used to test a mediation effect of perceived organizational politics on the relationship between emotional intelligence on the one hand, and job satisfaction, turnover intentions and negligent behavior on the other.

Findings

Perceived organizational politics was found to mediate the relationship between emotional intelligence and all three outcomes.

Practical implications

Emotional intelligence training may be a powerful tool that organizations and human resource managers can employ to reduce perceived organizational politics and enhance work attitudes and performance.

Originality/value

This research broadens the scope through which the intersection between emotion and organizational politics can be viewed, taking it beyond the role of both felt emotion and affective disposition. The findings show that emotional intelligence directly affects perceptions of politics, and indirectly affects employees' work attitudes and behaviors, through a mediation effect of perceived politics.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 43 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2013

Galit Meisler

The current study aims to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and perceived organizational justice, and how the interplay between them influences…

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3001

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aims to examine the relationship between emotional intelligence and perceived organizational justice, and how the interplay between them influences turnover intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 368 employees from a financial organization was used to test the research model and hypotheses. Archival information regarding participants’ actual turnover was also acquired.

Findings

Emotional intelligence was positively related to perceived organizational justice and negatively related to turnover intentions. Furthermore, perceived organizational justice fully mediated the relationship between emotional intelligence and turnover intentions. The archival data concerning employees’ actual turnover was significantly related to the self‐report turnover intentions.

Practical implications

Emotional intelligence training may be a powerful tool that organizations and human resource managers can employ to enhance perceived organizational justice and reduce employees’ turnover.

Originality/value

This research broadens the scope through which the contribution of emotional intelligence in the workplace can be viewed. Findings from the current study advance our understanding of the process by which emotional intelligence affects employees’ perceptions and attitudes.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Galit Meisler

The purpose of this paper is to explore the associations between emotional intelligence (EI) and both political skill and job satisfaction, as well as the possibility that…

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6902

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the associations between emotional intelligence (EI) and both political skill and job satisfaction, as well as the possibility that political skill mediates the relationship between EI and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

The data, collected from a sample of 368 employees, were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

EI was positively related to political skill and job satisfaction. In addition, the findings show that political skill mediates the relationship between EI and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The research highlights the importance of EI and political skill in the workplace.

Practical implications

EI training may be employed by organizations and human resource managers to enhance employees’ EI.

Originality/value

Not enough research attention has been paid to exploring the interplay between EI and organizational politics. The current study clarifies the relationship between EI and political skill in the work arena. Moreover, this study found political skill to be a mediator in the relationship between EI and job satisfaction. Given that in the main the literature has neglected the possibility that political skill might act as a mediator and/or affect work attitudes/behaviors, findings from the current study broaden the scope through which the role of political skill in the workplace can be viewed.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2016

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0

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Book part
Publication date: 14 August 2017

Abstract

Details

Power, Politics, and Political Skill in Job Stress
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-066-2

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