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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2022

Young Kim and Myoung-Gi Chon

The purpose of this study was to shed light on how effective environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication can be achieved through persuasive…

161

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to shed light on how effective environmental corporate social responsibility (CSR) communication can be achieved through persuasive communication strategies using message framing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an online experimental study with a 2 (narrative: narrative or non-narrative) × 2 (framing: gain or loss) between-subjects design.

Findings

The findings showed that environmental CSR communication using narrative framing messages is most effective in creating strong CSR associations between a company and the environmental CSR domain and sharing the company's CSR information on supportive communication and advocating for the environmental campaign.

Originality/value

This study highlights the importance of a company's environmental CSR communication efforts using the right message format (narrative style) to increase its persuasive sequence from CSR evaluation to supportive behaviors, contributing to theoretical development in the research of environmental CSR communication. This study suggests that environmental CSR campaign managers should first formalize the company's environmental responsiveness by clearly establishing policies and practicing CSR performance that could result in a strong CSR association before asking their target publics to engage in pro-environmental activities.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Jeffrey J. Bailey and Ralph A. Alexander

This project was designed as a laboratory study to investigate the effects of organizational social cues (OSC), decision framing, and justice on managerial decision making…

Abstract

This project was designed as a laboratory study to investigate the effects of organizational social cues (OSC), decision framing, and justice on managerial decision making in ethical situations. The OSC (ethical/ unethical), the framing (gain/loss), and the justice conditions (fair/unfair) were manipulated within a managerial in‐basket exercise. Participants read information about the organization and their situation within it. Next, they read scenarios and made several decisions involving ethical considerations. Results suggest that OSC and the experience of fairness or unfairness significantly influenced the managerial ethical decisions. Ethical OSC resulted in significantly more ethical decisions. Also, those in an “experienced fairness” justice condition made significantly more ethical decisions. The gain/loss framing did not significantly influence ethical decisions.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Maurice E. Schweitzer and Leslie A. DeChnrch

Two distinct literatures have investigated the impact of negotiator frames. Both literatures demonstrate that negotiator frames significantly influence both bargaining…

Abstract

Two distinct literatures have investigated the impact of negotiator frames. Both literatures demonstrate that negotiator frames significantly influence both bargaining behavior and negotiated outcomes. These two literatures, however, offer completely different conceptualizations of what negotiator frames actually are. In this article we classify these two conceptualizations as reference frames, the referent‐dependent perception of outcomes, and conflict frames, a multi‐dimensional orientation toward conflict. We report results from an experiment that links these two types of frames. We find that loss‐framed negotiators adopt conflict frames that are more win‐oriented and task‐oriented than the conflict frames gain‐framed negotiators adopt. Our results offer insight into the frame adoption process and have implications for dispute resolution and negotiation practice.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2021

Yanji Duan, John A. Aloysius and Diane A. Mollenkopf

Firms employ various forms of disclosure to demonstrate commitment to and involvement in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices. This research provides…

Abstract

Purpose

Firms employ various forms of disclosure to demonstrate commitment to and involvement in sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) practices. This research provides guidance to firms employing framing strategies when communicating their SSCM with external stakeholders like consumers as part of their supply chain transparency efforts.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employed a middle-range theorizing approach to understand the context of SSCM practices and mechanisms of variously framed communication methods to disclose sustainability information to consumers. The authors conducted two experiments in an e-waste recycling context, studying how sustainable information disclosed to consumers using attribute framing and goal framing can affect consumers' attitudes. The authors also examined the moderating role of consumers' environmental involvement.

Findings

Results suggest that when attribute framing is used, firms should avoid framing the attribute from a negative valence. When goal framing is used, messages with consequences stated as “avoid loss” yield the most substantial effect. Additionally, framing effects are more significant for consumers with higher-than-average environmental involvement.

Originality/value

The authors’ results contribute to the ongoing theorization of SSCM by providing contextual understanding of how to communicate sustainability information. Corroborating evidence from marketing, framing effects are found to be context specific, thereby elucidating the framing literature more fully to the SSCM context. The authors extend this literature by studying attribute framing and comparing the effectiveness of all possible goal framing combinations of valence and gain/loss perspective in the SSCM communication context.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Frank Dardis, Mike Schmierbach, Brett Sherrick and Britani Luckman

In-game advertising continues to increase in importance for both industry and academia. However, game difficulty – an important, real-world factor – has received little…

Abstract

Purpose

In-game advertising continues to increase in importance for both industry and academia. However, game difficulty – an important, real-world factor – has received little attention as a specific game-related factor that might impact the effectiveness of in-game advertisements. This study aims to investigate the influence of game difficulty on players’ affective response and subsequent memory of in-game ads, which were presented as either gain- or loss-framed messages.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments were conducted. Study 1 and Study 3 implemented a 2 (difficulty: easy/difficult) × 2 (ad framing: gain/loss) design. Study 2 implemented a 2 (background music: calm/stressful) × 2 (ad framing: gain/loss) design. All experiments took place in a research laboratory in which participants consented to the study, completed a pre-test questionnaire, played a video game, completed a post-test questionnaire and were debriefed.

Findings

More difficult game play led to greater negative affective response. A different game-based attribute – background music – did not influence affective response. A significant interaction in Study 1 revealed that brand recognition increased as players in a more negative affective state were exposed to the loss-framed message. The results were explained to occur via the congruency effects that game difficulty exerts on players’ affective and cognitive states.

Originality/value

The studies are the first to incorporate both videogame difficulty and ad framing into one study, which two real-world factors that can influence advertising’s effectiveness. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Carsten K.W. de Dreu, Ben J.M. Emans and Evert van de Vliert

Research has shown that negotiators are more cooperative when they code their prospective outcomes as gains (gain frame) instead of as losses (loss frame). Supplementing…

317

Abstract

Research has shown that negotiators are more cooperative when they code their prospective outcomes as gains (gain frame) instead of as losses (loss frame). Supplementing this prior research that focused exclusively on the effects of negotiator's own frame on his or her own behavior, we argue that frames are communicated and that negotiators are influenced not only by their own frames, but by other's communicated frame as well. This proposition was tested using a 2 X3 design, manipulating the negotiator's own frame (gains/losses) and other's communicated frame (gains/losses/not given). As predicted, other's communicated gain frame reinforced the negotiator's gain frame but did not alter the negotiator's loss frame into a gain frame. Other's communicated loss frame, however, both reinforced the negotiator's own loss frame and altered the negotiator's gain into a loss frame. As a result, other's communicated gain frame, compared to other's communicated loss frame, induced lower demands and higher concessions when negotiators had a gain frame themselves. Loss framed negotiators, however, were not significantly influenced by other's communicated frame.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

A.R. Elangovan

This paper seeks to examine the role of framing effects and the third‐party's need for consistency in intervention strategy selection in managerial dispute intervention…

1175

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the role of framing effects and the third‐party's need for consistency in intervention strategy selection in managerial dispute intervention. The objective is to move research forward by adopting a decision‐making perspective of dispute intervention and examining the role of framing in such a context.

Design/methodology/approach

A scenario‐based experimental approach was used and data were collected on 318 intervention cases from 106 students majoring in business, and enrolled in a medium‐sized public university.

Findings

Results suggest that framing does influence the selection of intervention strategies to some extent, but the third‐party's need for consistency between his/her preferred settlement and the actual final settlement plays a bigger role in influencing strategy selection.

Research limitations/implications

This study higlights the merits of adopting a decision‐making perspective to understand managerial dispute intervention and points to the need for extending and testing more of the key concepts from that area of research.

Practical implications

The results indicating support for a need for consistency on the part of managerial third‐parties as well as the influence of framing underscore the need for managers to be aware of these factors influencing their conflict management behaviours and to strive to “rise above the fray”.

Originality/value

The results of this paper challenge the conventional view that third‐parties in disputes are generally more objective and can see the “big picture”, and represents a valuable first step towards gaining a better understanding the role of cognitive biases and heuristics in managerial dispute intervention.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2021

Rohit Yadav, Mohit Yadav and Amit Mittal

Technology for fitness provides users with numerous features that aid the achievement of intended fitness/health goals such as checking consumption habits and adherence to…

Abstract

Purpose

Technology for fitness provides users with numerous features that aid the achievement of intended fitness/health goals such as checking consumption habits and adherence to exercise. Based upon the concepts of self-efficacy and prospect theories, this study aims to inspect the influence of messages frame on behavioral usage of virtual reality (VR) technology intervened fitness exercise.

Design/methodology/approach

By usage of a laboratory-based experiment commissioning certain fitness exercises, this study is conducted on 150 respondents. An assessment is conducted on the efficiency of gain appeal mechanism (exercise performance feedback) toward the usage of VR intervened fitness exercise and measured surge in exercise self-efficacy (ESE), playfulness (PL) and outcome expectations.

Findings

The results show that gain-appealed/framed messages prove advantageous over loss-appealed/framed in performing VR intervened exercises. A bootstrapped (method) mediation analysis confirms higher positive effects of gain-framed messages upon intentions to use VR intervened fitness exercise. VR intervened fitness exercise was strongly and positively mediated by ESE, PL and outcome expectations.

Practical implications

This study is of help to researchers and marketers trying to understand the role played by gain- and loss-framed messages on VR technology enabled fitness exercises.

Originality/value

This study helps VR and fitness technology developers and marketers understand the effectiveness of persuasive performance messages toward VR fitness exercise technology adoption amalgamating message intervention with better technology usage.

Details

Information Discovery and Delivery, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-6247

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Sabina Appiah-Boateng and Stephen B. Kendie

The purpose of this paper is to explore how framing of conflict in different phases is constructed and how the specific framing affects the development of the conflict and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how framing of conflict in different phases is constructed and how the specific framing affects the development of the conflict and its management in the farmer–herder conflict in the Asante Akyem North District of Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study area is Agogo which falls within the Asante Akyem North District in Ghana. The study used a qualitative approach whose philosophical ontology and epistemology believe that meaning is constructed (interpretivism). It further used a case study design using in-depth interviews, focus group discussion and observation guide. Purposive and snowball sampling techniques were used to select the respondents. The data were analysed using the thematic analysis approach. Ethical considerations such as informed consent, willingness and anonymity of respondents were duly respected.

Findings

The findings highlighted that the conflict actors formed frames such as identity-relational, affective-intellectual and negotiation-win frames as the drivers of the conflict. In this conflict, the farmers who are indigenes and custodians of the land feel more potent over the transnational migrants who are pastoralists and argue that the herdsmen be flushed out without negotiation.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the papers that bring to light the psychological dimension of the causes of the farmer–herder conflict in Ghana.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 February 2017

Brittany Harker Martin

Managerial mindset and cognitive bias can be barriers to any transformation strategy. In the case of telework, most employees express willingness to telework, yet, few…

1507

Abstract

Purpose

Managerial mindset and cognitive bias can be barriers to any transformation strategy. In the case of telework, most employees express willingness to telework, yet, few firms formally enable it during regular business hours. The status quo is a daily commute to the traditional workplace. The purpose of this paper is to test framing interventions designed to harness cognitive biases through choice architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon behavioral strategy and prospect theory, this paper presents two studies: quasi-experiments with 146 senior business students and experiments in the field (replication using random assignment and extension) with 84 senior decision makers. Both studies use a one-way between-subjects design and chi-square analysis.

Findings

Findings support the proposition that, although cognitive biases can act as barriers to transformation, they can be re-framed through strategic interventions. Specifically, in both studies, there was a drastic increase in adoption simply by changing the way the choice was presented. Findings in the lab were cross-validated in the field. Observed shifts in preferences provide evidence that embedding the right reference point within communications can frame a decision choice more favorably. Findings also support that a bias for an implicitly perceived status quo can be overruled through an explicitly stated reference point.

Research limitations/implications

It is an assumption of behavioral strategy that most individuals simply respond to the gains/loss framing without being influenced by other psychological or contextual factors, and though these effects dissipate through aggregation, it is a limitation nonetheless. Indeed, using an individual construct to explain an organizational phenomenon is a well-debated topic in the field of strategy, with proponents on both sides. The distinguishing factor, here, is that behavioral strategists are only interested in results at the aggregated level.

Practical implications

Practitioners attempting to roll out telework adoption, or any transformation, now have proven strategies for designing frames of reference that intervene against and harness the power of loss aversion and the status quo.

Social implications

This paper measures micro processes that have an effect at the macro level. It explains systematic aversion to adoption as an aggregation of decision-making behavior that is seemingly subconscious. In doing so, it highlights the impact of bounded rationality perpetuated through social systems, while measuring effective interventions designed to make systematic behavior more predictable.

Originality/value

A novel contribution is made in designing/testing a new frame for systematic resistance to change that frames the status quo as the losing prospect. In this frame, the perceived loss is in the choice not to change, and loss aversion proves to be an effective tool for facilitating systematic change.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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