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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2024

Gaby Probst and Laura Zizka

Higher education institutions (HEIs) seek innovative approaches to attract students. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many HEIs have considered diversification through digitalization…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions (HEIs) seek innovative approaches to attract students. Since the COVID-19 pandemic, many HEIs have considered diversification through digitalization. From the initial urgency to implement technology at the start of the pandemic to a gradual acceptance over time, HEIs witnessed a shift in perceptions. This paper aims to explore the evolution of the use of technology in HEI classrooms from pre- to post-Covid-19 as seen through the eyes of students and faculty members.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven surveys were conducted from March 2020 to January 2023 with faculty members and students at one business HEI in Switzerland. This longitudinal study analyzed the perceptions of faculty and students regarding technology in the ever-changing HEI environments. These results have been used to make practical recommendations for future HEI classroom settings.

Findings

The findings reveal that the social aspect must be considered when implementing technology into HEIs. Faculty members and students need appropriate training and adequate resources to engage with the technology in and outside the classroom. The results suggest that one result of the pandemic was a greater acceptance of blended learning practices in traditional business education.

Originality/value

The pandemic has left long-lasting effects on teaching and learning. While many HEIs revert to traditional ways, the authors suggest the need to embrace technology that encourages engagement and authentic teaching and learning. HEIs must listen to their faculty members and students, to create more innovative learning environments.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2021

Laura Zizka and Gaby Probst

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe in March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) worldwide were confronted with creating online courses to complete the…

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Abstract

Purpose

With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe in March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) worldwide were confronted with creating online courses to complete the semester. While emphasizing positive elements such as flexibility and innovative solutions, the literature focused on numerous faculty problems such as online fatigue, emotional well-being and stress. This paper aims to explore faculty perceptions of teaching during the exceptional circumstances of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Two surveys, in the first week and at the end of the semester, were conducted at a business school in Switzerland via the program Lima. A total of 19 faculty members participated in the survey. Of the participants, 56.7% responded in the first survey and 70.9% responded in the second.

Findings

The findings revealed that the faculty’s impressions of their online courses remained positive. The most significant issue cited was time. According to faculty estimations, more than ten additional hours per week were spent preparing for online courses. Nonetheless, many faculty members reported interest in continuing online practices in their future courses.

Practical implications

The COVID-19 pandemic pushed HEIs to embrace the digital revolution while teaching in a competence-oriented mode. However, moving forward, HEIs must mitigate the long-term effects by careful planning and evaluating their digital readiness as an institution and offering training for their faculty and students when necessary.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the existing literature by analyzing one stakeholder group, i.e. faculty members, and their perceptions of teaching during a worldwide pandemic.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2022

Laura Zizka and Gaby Probst

In March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) were obliged to complete the semester online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the semesters that followed, HEIs reopened…

Abstract

Purpose

In March 2020, higher education institutions (HEIs) were obliged to complete the semester online because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In the semesters that followed, HEIs reopened and closed again because of new waves of the pandemic. While flexibility was lauded, previous literature cited student problems such as lack of motivation and social contact. This study aims to explore students' perceptions of learning during four exceptional semesters.

Design/methodology/approach

Five surveys were conducted via the program LimeSurvey during the online courses at one business school in Switzerland: April 2020, June 2020, December 2020, June 2021 and December 2021. The participation varied between 56% (April and June 2020), 52% (December 2020), 47.5% (June 2021) and 42.4% (December 2021).

Findings

The results of this longitudinal study were analyzed to examine the consequences of “forced” online learning. The analysis reveals that although the students appreciate the usefulness of the learning experience, their motivation decreased. The historic crisis has underlined sudden technological changes in the learning programs that have had multiple (adverse) effects on students' learning.

Originality/value

Based on the results, this study concludes that students have mixed perceptions regarding the learning environments (traditional, hybrid or blended) moving forward. Whatever the choice, HEIs must carefully plan the most effective teaching/learning environment to ensure that students remain engaged. This study reveals the links and interconnections in this complex online setting called “learning” based on four semesters of urgent remote learning and one semester of hybrid face-to-face courses.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 July 2022

Aswathy Sreenivasan and M. Suresh

The purpose of this paper is to “identify”, “analyze” and “construct” a framework to quantify the relationships between several determinants of organizational preparedness for…

461

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to “identify”, “analyze” and “construct” a framework to quantify the relationships between several determinants of organizational preparedness for change in the start-ups during the COVID-19 emergencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Total interpretive structural modelling (TISM) is used to find characteristics that assist in analyzing the readiness or preparedness level before initiating a change deployment process in start-ups. A cross-impact matrix multiplication applied to classification (MICMAC) analysis is performed to determine the driving and dependent elements of change in start-ups.

Findings

From literature research and an expert interview, this study selected ten variables of change preparedness to explore inner interconnections and comprehend the inner connections factors. The findings depict that clarity of mission and goals, reward system, technological advancement and motivational readiness have been considered the most important readiness factor for deploying organizational change in start-ups during the COVID-19 emergencies.

Practical implications

This research will aid the management and researchers gain a better understanding of the factors that influence change preparedness. Constant observation of current changes in the start-ups and the external environment will aid in improving the quality of products or services provided by the start-ups during the COVID-19. The start-ups can use these criteria linked to change readiness. The priority of each element is determined using MICMAC analysis and ranking using the TISM technique, which assists start-ups in ordering the enablers from highest to lowest priority.

Originality/value

There is no research regarding factors influencing organizational readiness for change in start-ups during the COVID-19 emergencies. This research gap is filled by analyzing aspects linked to organizational readiness for change in start-ups. This gap inspired the present study, which uses the “Total Interpretive Structural Modelling (TISM)” technique to uncover change determinants and investigate hierarchical interconnections among factors influencing organizational readiness to change in start-ups during the COVID-19 emergencies.

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

I.J. Hetty Van Emmerik and Martin C. Euwema

This study seeks to examine the association of employee's evaluation of organizational restructuring with the destruction of old social capital, development of new social capital…

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Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the association of employee's evaluation of organizational restructuring with the destruction of old social capital, development of new social capital, and the mediating role of perceived organizational support (POS).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were used from 419 teachers of Dutch secondary schools using hierarchical regression analyses.

Findings

Results show that more positive employees' evaluation of the organizational restructuring are less likely to remain relying on old social capital resources, and score higher on development of new social capital. Moreover, POS mediated the association of employee's evaluation of the organizational restructuring with old and new social capital.

Research limitations/implications

Future research, utilizing longitudinal designs and experiments that better lend it to causal inferences, are needed to examine relationships between organizational restructuring, POS, and social capital.

Originality/value

The results of this study provide a first step toward outlining the importance of organizational restructuring for social capital theory and how employees cope with transition to different work units. In organizations, having a shared language and narratives may allow team members to more easily integrate knowledge and provide better support to one another. Moreover, a common perspective and understanding among team members may allow employees members to anticipate the behavior of other members, thus promoting organizational efficiency and effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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