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Article

Gabrielle Ka Wai Wong

The purpose of this paper is to highlight academic librarians’ understanding of leadership and leadership development, with the aim to shed light on further research that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight academic librarians’ understanding of leadership and leadership development, with the aim to shed light on further research that can inform and improve practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review on academic library leadership was conducted. Particular attention was placed on the three common leadership modes in academic libraries: emergent leadership, team leadership and headship. The review covers librarians’ conception of leadership, desirable leadership capabilities and existing leadership development.

Findings

Librarians view leadership as a process of influence, and understand that leadership does not only come from formal leaders. Lacking is a more structured knowledge of what constitute effect leadership. In the literature, team and emergent leadership have not been adequately explored; most leadership research in the field takes on a headship approach.

Research limitations/implications

The publications reviewed were selective; not all papers on the topic were included.

Practical implications

Featuring the three leadership modes brings librarians’ attention to the crucial differences among them; and hence directs future discussion to a more focused approach that addresses each leadership mode specifically.

Originality/value

This paper differs from previous literature reviews on library leadership; it is the first one comparing and contrasting publications using the three leadership modes.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Gabrielle Ka Wai Wong and Diana L.H. Chan

The purpose of this paper is to outline the core ideas of adaptive leadership and relates them to challenges confronting academic libraries.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to outline the core ideas of adaptive leadership and relates them to challenges confronting academic libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an overview of the adaptive leadership model and highlights the key concepts. Recent initiatives at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Library are used as cases to illustrate how the model may guide the authors’ focus to finding leverage points.

Findings

Using the model, the key role of positional leaders shifts from the traditional sense of giving direction and protection to followers, to one that orchestrates the change process with the team through difficulties and uncertainties, and to build culture and structure that facilitate adaptive changes.

Practical implications

Academic librarians can use the concepts and framework of adaptive leadership to design change strategies and manage change processes.

Originality/value

This is the first paper introducing the adaptive leadership model to academic libraries.

Details

Library Management, vol. 39 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Gabrielle Ka Wai Wong

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Library collected a rich set of assessment data for its Learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) Library collected a rich set of assessment data for its Learning Commons (LC), and how it analyzed, summarized and presented the data to drive improvement as well as to demonstrate impact.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment targeted at exploring users’ perception of and experience in using the LCs. It employed multiple channels to collect data. It comprised of three student focus groups, and two questionnaire surveys for students and service partners, respectively. They were planned strategically, with clear objectives and a phase-by-phase design, so that the instruments can be fine-tuned based on the findings and experience of the previous one.

Findings

The assessment collected a good amount of qualitative and quantitative data. It showed that the LCs had become a very important part of students’ campus life. Students’ experience reported through the focus groups and survey helped the Library to make a number of improvement in services and facilities. The result was tactfully presented to senior university administrators as a proof of the Library's impact.

Practical implications

The case study showed how an assessment, when strategically planned, can generate findings that help libraries to demonstrate their capability and impact on students’ academic life. The methods applied in this case study can also be used by other functional areas.

Originality/value

The assessment went beyond quantitative measures, it tapped into students’ experience. The paper illustrates how HKUST Library analyzed and presented the data to achieve results and changes. Other libraries may find this process helpful for future assessment planning.

Details

Library Management, vol. 35 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article

Gabrielle Ka Wai Wong, Victoria F. Caplan, Diana L. H. Chan, Lois M. Y. Fung and K.T. Lam

The purpose of this paper is to describe HKUST Library’s active participation in helping the university prepare for the 2014 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2014) in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe HKUST Library’s active participation in helping the university prepare for the 2014 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE 2014) in Hong Kong. Through the process the authors demonstrated library’s value and librarians’ expertise in supporting research.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a case study that highlights how HKUST Library tackled this complex exercise. The effort was delineated as three stages: the design stage when the authors proactively supported the electronic system design for RAE 2014, the formation stage in which the submission infrastructure was built, and the data process stage.

Findings

Based on the Library’s experience in creating and managing the Institutional Repository and the Scholarly Publication Database, the participation proved to be instrumental in designing and building the electronic infrastructure for the RAE 2014. After the project, the HKUST research community had higher trust and regard of the Library, both for the research information management systems and librarians’ expertise in providing research support service.

Practical implications

The paper elaborates details of HKUST Library’s effort, including human resource deployment, project management strategy, operational tactics, challenges the authors faced and keys to success. The experience demonstrates that libraries and librarians can establish credibility and gain respect from research communities through delivering tangible outcomes.

Originality/value

There is very few case studies in the literature on libraries’ participation in and contribution to RAEs. This paper fills a gap in the area.

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