Search results

1 – 10 of 18
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gabriele Griffin

In “Can the subaltern speak?,” Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak makes the important distinction between representation as “Vertretung” and “Darstellung.” She also produces a…

Abstract

Purpose

In “Can the subaltern speak?,” Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak makes the important distinction between representation as “Vertretung” and “Darstellung.” She also produces a strong version of whom she regards as a subaltern woman. Thirty years on both the distinction between “Vertretung” and “Darstellung” and the question of who the subaltern woman is, remain extremely important, not least in methodological considerations in cross-cultural contexts. A number of questions may be asked in relation to representation, such as: how distinct are its two meanings in the interviewing context? And how do they relate to the notion of the co-production of knowledge which has gained such traction in the past three decades? The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, I draw on cross-cultural interviewing experiences. Starting from the silence of illiterate rural women in a study conducted in Madhya Pradesh, India, in 2011 (Mohanraj), this paper draws on the research experiences of the author and a number of projects reported on in Cross-Cultural Interviewing (Griffin, 2016) to elucidate how one might re-think both representation and subalternality in the contemporary globalized context.

Findings

The experiences of cross-cultural interviewing I draw on in this paper show that in the contemporary context subalternality may be more productively understood in terms of a continuum rather than as the radical state of unreachable, unspeaking alterity that Spivak proposes.

Originality/value

The paper contributes new perspectives on Spivak’s notion of the unspeaking alterity of the subaltern in light of globalized developments over the past 30 years and specific experiences of cross-cultural interviewing, as these comment on Spivak’s insights.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Memory Mphaphuli and Gabriele Griffin

The purpose of this paper is to explore the fieldwork dilemmas a young, female, heterosexual, indigenous South African researching everyday negotiations around…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the fieldwork dilemmas a young, female, heterosexual, indigenous South African researching everyday negotiations around heterosexuality within township families encountered in negotiating her own heteroerotic subjectivity within the field.

Design/methodology/approach

A heterosexuality studies approach is here combined with a critical feminist research methodological perspective.

Findings

The paper argues that researchers are often unprepared for having to negotiate their erotic subjectivity within the field and that such negotiations can be compromising to the researcher in a variety of ways.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that more might be done to prepare researchers for negotiating identity aspects such as sexuality in the field since that negotiation impacts on one’s research and the researcher’s sense of self in the field.

Social implications

The paper critically interrogates what negotiating one’s erotic subjectivity in the field might mean.

Originality/value

Little is published on female researchers negotiating their heteroerotic subjectivity in the field. The paper contributes original insights on this from fieldwork carried out by an indigenous heterosexual female researcher in South African townships. It raises important issues about the conduct of fieldwork in (non-)compromising and agentic ways.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Muhammad Saeed and Gabriele Griffin

The purpose of this paper is to explore fieldwork dilemmas for a Pakhtun researcher, educated in the West, to research family or domestic violence in the unstable, hostile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore fieldwork dilemmas for a Pakhtun researcher, educated in the West, to research family or domestic violence in the unstable, hostile environment of the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province, Pakistan.

Design/methodology/approach

A gender studies approach is here combined with masculinities studies, and a critical qualitative research methodology is used in this study.

Findings

The paper argues that unstable regions dominated by certain forms of masculinity require specific research approaches when conducting research and addressing a topic that is culturally taboo.

Practical implications

The paper suggests how the insider–outsider dynamic plays out for researchers who come from a particular field and return to it under changed circumstances. It also indicates how a taboo topic in a context where direct questioning is not possible might be approached through the use of vignettes.

Social implications

The paper suggests how the contradictory position of a masculinity, simultaneously bearing traces of the hegemonic and of marginalization, may be negotiated in the field.

Originality/value

Social research on the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan is rarely conducted and reported due to the unrest in this region. The paper thus contributes original insights from fieldwork carried out there. It also contributes to the limited but growing literature on conducting fieldwork in hostile environments.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gabriele Griffin

The purpose of this paper is to explore why the use of a particular qualitative method, walking, failed in a given context, the Chile of contemporary unrest.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore why the use of a particular qualitative method, walking, failed in a given context, the Chile of contemporary unrest.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores walking methodologies from a critical cultural perspective.

Findings

The article argues that context as socio-material entanglement, or people's relation to place, in a volatile situation, requires strong participatory engagement to enable productive outcomes and also that one can learn from the failure to generate such engagement.

Practical implications

The article suggests that enhanced participant involvement in experimental design (here a walking event) is necessary when the situation on the ground is conflict-ridden. It also suggests that explicitly articulating one's outsider position may facilitate productive exchanges in volatile contexts. The article further suggests that failure of method is a neglected but useful topic in qualitative research.

Social implications

Although walking methodologies frequently claim to be participant-centered, they are not always organized in that manner. If they are not, they risk undermining the democratic potential of alt-meths that is of particular importance in volatile contexts.

Originality/value

Failure of method is rarely reported on. The paper addresses that knowledge gap.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Antonia Darder and Tom G. Griffiths

The purpose of this paper is to provide a sense of the perspectives that guide the collection of articles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a sense of the perspectives that guide the collection of articles.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an introductory essay regarding the contributions and critics associated with Spivak’s work.

Findings

In addition, the contents lay out brief descriptions of the articles included in the collection.

Originality/value

The notion of revisiting “Can the subaltern speak?” provides authors with innovative and provocative ideas to guide their submissions.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Content available
Article

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Gabriele Santoro, Demetris Vrontis and Alberto Pastore

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of external knowledge in the innovation process of firms in the food and beverage (F&B) industry and the effects of two…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the role of external knowledge in the innovation process of firms in the food and beverage (F&B) industry and the effects of two external knowledge sourcing modes on new product development (NPD) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies a quantitative approach, relying on data from 157 Italian firms operating in the F&B industry to test the hypotheses through OLS regression models.

Findings

Results suggest that the surveyed firms actively engage in open innovation with strong ties with market-based sources. Moreover, the authors found that market-based sources are associated with income from incremental innovation and time to market, while science-based sources are associated with income from radical innovation. Finally, the authors found that the R&D intensity enhances the benefits of the above external knowledge sourcing modes.

Originality/value

Despite the large amount of studies assessing the effects of external knowledge sourcing on performance in the open innovation field, few studies focused on a specific industry, especially with regard to F&B. Moreover, this paper considers different types of NPD performance measures given that different external knowledge sourcing modes exert different effects.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part

Patricia Danyluk

Who really teaches student teachers how to teach? Utilizing a sociology of childhood and youth theoretical framework and a descriptive phenomenology design and method…

Abstract

Who really teaches student teachers how to teach? Utilizing a sociology of childhood and youth theoretical framework and a descriptive phenomenology design and method, this study sought to ask children and youth about their experiences as the student teachers placed in their classroom developed classroom management skills. This study utilized questions, observations, drawings, and focus groups to address the research question: “How do children and youth in the classroom impact the experience of classroom management for student teachers?” The goal of the study was not to find instances where children or youth in the classroom assisted or negated the development of classroom management but instead, to observe if this occurred and if it did, how it occurred. In asking this question, this study extends beyond the existing literature and considers the role of children and youth in the development of classroom management for student teachers.

Key findings indicate that children and youth attempt to communicate their classroom management needs with their student teachers verbally, physically, and behaviorally. Through observations, a model emerged of behavior demonstrating increased student engagement or lack of engagement. During focus groups, participants elucidated the thoughts and or feelings behind their classroom behavior. Although drawings were collected during focus groups, this study would have benefited from more discussion with children regarding their drawings.

Details

Soul of Society: A Focus on the Lives of Children & Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-060-5

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article

Tommaso Buganza, Gabriele Colombo and Paolo Landoni

The aim of this paper is to investigate how small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can engage in collaborations with universities in different phases of the new product…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate how small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can engage in collaborations with universities in different phases of the new product development process, taking into account the peculiarities of SMEs.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper combines a qualitative methodology (five SME case studies) with a quantitative one (a survey of 28 SMEs). The quantitative data are used to support the preliminary results obtained through the qualitative analysis.

Findings

SMEs engage in collaborations with universities following a progressive model; from the easiest collaborations during the testing phase to more complex collaborations during the research phase. In this way, SMEs establish a trust-based relationship with universities. Furthermore, technology management capabilities and project management capabilities are crucial prerequisites for managing complex forms of collaboration with universities.

Practical implications

SME managers should be aware of the difficulties associated with complex collaborations. They can overcome such problems by adopting a progressive collaboration model as well by as developing project management and technology management capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper offers new insights on how to deepen the important topic of how SMEs can manage and develop their relationships with universities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

1 – 10 of 18