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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Gabriel Gazzoli, Murat Hancer and BeomCheol (Peter) Kim

The purpose of this paper is to examine why employee‐level customer orientation (CO) influences the customer experience in a service setting.

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5771

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why employee‐level customer orientation (CO) influences the customer experience in a service setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the dyadic nature of the study, a two‐way sample design was used which integrated employee responses with customer responses. A total of 186 employees and 1,117 customers participated in the study. The data was aggregated at the employee level of analysis.

Findings

The study found that job satisfaction and employee commitment mediated the relationship between employee‐level CO and a customer's perception of interaction quality. Additionally, interaction quality is shown to be positively related to customer satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

Although the design of the research utilized data from both customers and employees from several restaurant outlets in the USA, all the restaurants belonged to one chain (reflecting a single corporate culture), and thus it may be difficult to generalize the results.

Originality/value

This study extends the CO theory by explaining how and why CO affects a customer's perceptions from an organizational behavior (OB) perspective, with job satisfaction and organizational commitment as mediators. This is important as the few studies that attempted to explain the effect of CO on customers' experience through mediating variables took a marketing perspective instead of an OB view. Practically, this research highlights the important role that human resource management may have from the interactive marketing perspective.

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Gabriel Gazzoli, Woo Gon Kim and Radesh Palakurthi

The internet has significantly changed the ways hotels distribute and price their products. The imminent success of online intermediaries caused financial problems for…

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14267

Abstract

Purpose

The internet has significantly changed the ways hotels distribute and price their products. The imminent success of online intermediaries caused financial problems for hotel chains since online travel agencies offered better prices than the hotel brand websites. The existing literature on hotel online distribution has focused on pricing strategies and room availability issues for different segments of hotels. This paper, however, aims to compare online room prices of global hotel chains across online distribution channels and their own brand websites.

Design/methodology/approach

By using only the internet, 2,800 room rates were collected and analyzed. Descriptive statistics such as means and percentage were used to answer the research questions. Personal interviews with a CEO of an e‐business company and an area revenue director of a global hotel chain were conducted to confirm our findings and to gain additional insights in the related issues.

Findings

Descriptive statistics indicated that US properties are doing a much better job than their international partners in regards to “best rate guarantee,” “rate parity,” and room availability across online channels. Rate consistency still remains a problem within US properties.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of this study is the use of convenience sampling methods, sample size, and currency conversion instruments.

Originality/value

Findings of this study would benefit revenue managers, general managers, hotel owners, and corporate brand managers to make decisions and to formulate new policies concerning their online distribution, revenue, and brand optimization strategies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2008

Fevzi Okumus

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384

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2020

Melanie F. Boninsegni, Olivier Furrer and Anna S. Mattila

This article explores four dimensions of frontline employee (FLE) friendliness (humorous, informal, conversational, and approachable) to propose a relevant measurement…

Abstract

Purpose

This article explores four dimensions of frontline employee (FLE) friendliness (humorous, informal, conversational, and approachable) to propose a relevant measurement instrument of the influence of FLE friendliness on relationship quality and perceived value, as well as its indirect influence on repatronage intentions. Recent studies suggest FLE friendliness, defined as a tendency to convey an affective customer–employee social interaction, is a critical determinant of relationship marketing, but few scholars agree on its dimensionality. This study seeks a deeper understanding of FLE friendliness by investigating its different dimensions in various service contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

The mixed-method design, including both qualitative and quantitative research, offers a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of FLE friendliness.

Findings

The content analysis suggests FLE friendliness is multidimensional and composed of humorous, informal, conversational, and approachable behaviors. The results of a quantitative survey, conducted across four service contexts, validate this four-factor model. A second quantitative survey across two service contexts reveals the weights and relative importance of the dimensions, and then a third quantitative survey across three service contexts confirms that FLE friendliness is a significant driver of relationship quality, perceived value, and repatronage intentions (indirectly).

Originality/value

This study contributes to relationship marketing literature by strengthening the conceptual foundations of FLE friendliness, clarifying the dimensionality of the construct, developing a comprehensive measurement instrument, and extending previous research on the customer–employee interactions.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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