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Article
Publication date: 19 May 2020

Svante Andersson, Gabriel Baffour Awuah, Ulf Aagerup and Ingemar Wictor

This study aims to investigate how mature born global firms create value for customers to achieve continued international growth.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how mature born global firms create value for customers to achieve continued international growth.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a case study approach to investigate the under-researched area of how mature born globals create value for customers and, by doing so, contribute to their continued international growth. This in-depth examination of how three born globals developed over time uses interviews, observation and secondary data.

Findings

The findings indicate that the entrepreneurs of born global firms, that continued to grow, created a culture in the early stages that supported value creation for foreign customers. These firms have built a competitive position by developing international niche products. They have also implemented a combination of proactive and reactive market orientation to facilitate the creation and delivery of value to customers. To maintain growth, they further invest the revenues earned on additional international marketing activities and continuously enhance their focal products.

Research limitations/implications

The study relies on three cases. We therefore recommend that future studies extend the scope of the research to several companies in various industries and countries, in which the theoretical arguments can be applied. In addition, further studies that test the propositions developed in this study, in different contexts, are highly recommended.

Practical implications

To gain international growth, managers should create an organizational culture that facilitates satisfying international customer needs. Firms should continuously invest in sales and market development (e.g. social media marketing, personal selling) and undertake technology development of niche rather than new products. To achieve international growth, managers need to standardize part of the offer to achieve economies of scale and adapt the other part to international customers' needs.

Originality/value

Research on born globals has focused on the early stages of their internationalization processes, while largely neglecting the later stages (mature born globals) or the factors that lead to continued international growth. To address this gap, this study explores what happens when born globals ‘grow up’. This study contributes to the literature by capturing the factors and processes underlying how mature born globals create value for customers, for international growth. In particular, the study shows that the culture and strategies developed in the born globals' early stages also lead to international growth in later stages. The mature born globals have also invested in niche products, brand building, and effective market channels and adopted a combination of proactive and reactive market orientations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Gabriel Baffour Awuah

In discussing what a firm’s competence is all about and how that is developed over time, the focus has been on how a firm develops its “core” or “distinctive” competence…

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2622

Abstract

In discussing what a firm’s competence is all about and how that is developed over time, the focus has been on how a firm develops its “core” or “distinctive” competence all by itself. The imbeddedness of a firm in networks of exchange relationships and how that impinges on the development and nurture of a firm’s competence has attracted very scant study. The purpose of this study is to deepen our understanding of the extent to which a firm’s networks of exchange relationships influence its competence development. Two empirical case studies have been conducted in that regard. One important conclusion is that a firm’s network(s) of exchange relationships is an asset that can be exploited to develop its competence. An important implication of the study is that it takes a long time and many resources to build exchange relationships that last in our integrated markets. Many resources and skills will be needed to handle relationships, once established.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 16 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Gabriel Baffour Awuah and Mohamed Amal

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms in least developed countries (LDCs). Two main…

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15771

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contribute to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms in least developed countries (LDCs). Two main research questions will be addressed. How does globalization affect the competitiveness of small to medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) in LDCs? How can SMEs handle opportunities and challenges emerging from globalization?

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology for this study is a conceptual attempt to review the existing literature and make some propositions about how SMEs can handle the opportunities and challenges emerging from globalization.

Findings

Building on a developed operational framework affecting the competitiveness of firms, some of the expected results are that firms' capabilities with regards to innovation, learning, and internationalization, which increase their competitiveness, are enhanced by institutional setups. Second, establishing relationships with governmental and non‐governmental institutions is crucial in terms of accessing resources, innovating, and entering into foreign markets.

Originality/value

The paper represents a contribution to the debate on the impact of globalization on the competitiveness of firms, particularly SMEs, in LDCs. Although globalization has brought considerable benefits to many actors worldwide, its impact on competitiveness of (SMEs) are controversial. We suggest that globalization's effects depend on the capability of firms to learning, to innovate, and also on the institutional setup in LDCs.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 21 November 2008

Gabriel Baffour Awuah and Desalegn Abraha Gebrekidan

In the extant literature a firm's development of its competitive advantage is seen to be the task of the firm alone. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new and a…

Abstract

Purpose

In the extant literature a firm's development of its competitive advantage is seen to be the task of the firm alone. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new and a broader approach of how competitive advantage can be developed and maintained in today's highly competitive and dynamic markets. To this end, how a firm handles its relationships with significant actors in its network becomes very decisive for the development of its competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a network approach, case studies have been used to shed lights on the extent to which the development of competitive advantage of firms affect and are affected by their interaction with some actors in a network of exchange relationships.

Findings

An important conclusion of this study is that a firm's highly valued performance, an indication of its strong position or competitive strength, has its roots in its regular and intensive interaction with some significant actors in its network.

Research limitations/implications

All firms in this study have demonstrated that competitive advantage can be achieved by building up a strong position through interaction, learning and adaptation with some significant actors in the marketplace. Since the study is based on one setting, extending a similar study to several settings will be very useful.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into how a firm, in the effort to build its competitive advantage, draws on its own capabilities and complementary capabilities of its partners in a network.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

Gabriel Baffour Awuah, Desalegn Abraha Gebrekidan and Aihie Osarenkhoe

The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to…

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1661

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to provide deeper insights into the extent to which an independent actor(s) actively collaborates with the internationalizing firm so as to jointly determine the choice of market, the mode of entry and the level of investment committed in the market to be entered and even after the entry (i.e. the ongoing activities).

Design/methodology/approach

Against the previous purpose section, a qualitative research approach is selected to guide the exploratory nature of this study. Thus qualitative data are used to build the two case studies because case studies are generally a more appropriate approach when “how” and “why” questions are being posed and when the investigator has little control over events.

Findings

Based on two multiple case studies, one major finding of the study shows that independent actors, with their interconnected networks, have played and are still playing a major role in influencing the internationalization processes of each of the two firms in this study.

Originality/value

This is an original paper developed based on two case studies which have not been published in any journal before. The paper highlights the role of external independent actors in internationalization, which is not mentioned at all or stressed in the extant literature.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2013

Mohamed Amal, Gabriel Baffour Awuah, Henrique Raboch and Svante Andersson

This paper aims, by a direct comparison, to address the differences and similarities of the internationalization processes of multinational companies both from developed…

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3201

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims, by a direct comparison, to address the differences and similarities of the internationalization processes of multinational companies both from developed and emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed qualitative approach, using an integrated model of internationalization process. Multiple case studies, with two companies with significant involvement in foreign markets and originating in countries with different levels of development, were carried out.

Findings

The results reveal that the case companies show some differences with regards to their use of ownership advantages to facilitate their internationalization. On the other hand, learning and experience of internationalization, coupled with the use of networks, have been factors that have influenced the pace and the pattern of the case companies' internationalization. An integrated model, which includes variables related to networks and learning/experience, may contribute to the understanding of the case of multinational companies from emerging economies.

Originality/value

Although the research field of emerging multinationals has been growing lately, very few attempts have been made in the sense of directly comparing the internationalization process of firms from both developed and emerging countries. The authors proposed an integrated analytical model that draws on insights from the eclectic paradigm and the Uppsala internationalization model.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2009

Göran Svensson, Svante Andersson, Tore Mysen and Gabriel Baffour Awuah

The purpose of this paper is to compare similarities and differences in perceived quality of business relationships in Norway and Sweden.

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2688

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare similarities and differences in perceived quality of business relationships in Norway and Sweden.

Design/methodology/approach

The Norwegian and Swedish sampling frames consisted of 600 small‐ and medium‐sized firms in each country. A response rate of 36.5 percent was achieved in Norway and 21 percent in Sweden. Leading executives from both countries were used as key informants because they are the primary decision‐makers most knowledgeable about their firm's interactions with suppliers.

Findings

The findings indicate that there are a series of significant differences and associations between the perceived quality of business relationships in small and medium‐sized firms in Norway and Sweden, though both countries resemble each other in both socio‐economic indicators and cultural dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

One suggestion for further research is to replicate the study in other industries, business relationships, and countries. Another is to undertake a longitudinal approach of the focal areas of “perceived quality” and “supplier criteria”.

Practical implications

This study is of managerial interest, as the framework may be applied by firms to monitor and evaluate ongoing supplier relationships and, in extension, their current customer relationships. It would be of interest to see if similarities exist amongst other cultures of the focal areas, and/or if there are differences across other countries that are decidedly different from those in Norway and Sweden.

Originality/value

This paper makes a contribution to inter‐organizational theory since it outlines a conceptual framework of focal areas of “perceived quality” and “supplier criteria” for examining business relationships across industries and countries for the benefit of other researchers.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 January 2011

Mohamed Amal

Downloads
1367

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 January 2013

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151

Abstract

Details

European Business Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Paul Korsi Simpson and Peter Korsi Simpson

The credibility of valuation is enhanced by the use of quality and reliable property market data. Nonetheless, the availability of quality and reliable market data remains…

Abstract

Purpose

The credibility of valuation is enhanced by the use of quality and reliable property market data. Nonetheless, the availability of quality and reliable market data remains a problem for valuers in Ghana, as current market data sources are tainted with issues of reliability. The purpose of this study is to examine the possibility of establishing property market data banks in Ghana, to help solve the market data problem faced by valuers.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a mixed-method approach consisting of the identification and review of literature, interviews with officials from the Lands Valuation Division of the Lands Commission and a questionnaire survey of property valuers.

Findings

The study finds that it is possible for property market data banks to be established, and in the absence of facilitating legislation, partnerships among various stakeholders are the best way of achieving this. The study identifies the lack of initiative and the lack of partnerships among the various stakeholders inter alia as the major factors limiting the establishment of property market data banks. The findings imply a need for stakeholders to take initiative to establish a property market data bank aimed at improving the quality and reliability of market data to enhance the valuation practice.

Originality/value

The study asserts the possibility of creating a property market data bank in Ghana, notwithstanding the limiting factors. The findings will provide a basis for relevant institutions and agencies to take cooperative action for the establishment of property market data banks, towards enhancing the valuation practice in Ghana as well as in other developing countries. The study will also prompt research into various tools and mechanisms to be adopted towards the establishment of property market data banks through participatory means.

Details

Property Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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