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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

GRANT HOCKING

This paper is concerned with the determination of the transient stress and deformational state of plate‐like discontinua subject to flexural cracking. Such a phenomenon…

Abstract

This paper is concerned with the determination of the transient stress and deformational state of plate‐like discontinua subject to flexural cracking. Such a phenomenon can be easily visualized as the type of fragmentation to floating sea ice impacted by an ice‐breaker or offshore platform. The discrete element method is used to solve the dynamic equilibrium equations for each distinct deformable body and the interaction between bodies. Each body may deform elastically and fracture into further pieces if a brittle failure criterion for flexure is exceeded. The discrete plate element is a hybrid thin‐plate (Kirchhoff) mode lumped at element boundaries with transverse shear deformation computed at element centroids. Errors in computed stresses near point loads and cracks by the current element warrant the use of an improved mixed mode plate element. A three‐dimensional application of the discrete element method is presented for the case of fragmentation of floating sea ice impacting an arctic offshore platform. A semi‐implicit solution scheme is introduced to overcome the stringent explicit time step stability conditions due to stiff members in the discrete element formulation.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2019

Amy Sweeny, Lisa van den Berg, Julia Hocking, Julia Renaud, Sharleen Young, Richard Henshaw, Kelly Foster and Tegwen Howell

The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure and impact of a Queensland Research Support Network (RSN) in emergency medicine (EM).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the structure and impact of a Queensland Research Support Network (RSN) in emergency medicine (EM).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a descriptive summary of EM networks, network evaluations and the structure and development of the Emergency Medicine Foundation’s (EMF) RSN in Queensland, including an observational pre- and post-study of research metrics.

Findings

In two years, the RSN supported 33 Queensland emergency departments (EDs), of which 14 developed research strategies. There was an increase in research active clinicians, from 23 in 2015 to 181 in 2017. Collaborator engagement increased from 9 in 2015 to 276 in 2017 as did the number of research presentations, from 6 in 2015 to 61 in 2017. EMF experienced a growth in new researchers, with new investigators submitting approximately 60 per cent of grant applications in 2016 and 2017. EMF also received new applications from a further three HHS (taking EMF-funded research activity from 8 to 11 HHS).

Research limitations/implications

This paper describes changes in KPIs and research metrics, which the authors attribute to the establishment of the RSN. However, it is possible that attribution bias plays a role in the KPI improvements.

Social implications

This network has actively boosted and expanded EM research capacity and capability in Queensland. It provides services, in the form of on-the-ground managers, to develop novice clinician-researchers, new projects and engage entire EDs. This model may be replicated nationwide but requires funding commitment.

Originality/value

The RSN improves front-line clinician research capacity and capability and increases research activity and collaborations with clear community outcomes. Collaborations were extended to community, primary health networks, non-government organisations, national and international researchers and academic institutions. Evaluating and measuring a network’s benefits are difficult, but it is likely that evaluations will help networks obtain funding.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Prithwiraj (Raj) Choudhury

This chapter argues that intra-firm geographic mobility is an understudied mechanism that can help mitigate coordination failures in a geographically distributed

Abstract

This chapter argues that intra-firm geographic mobility is an understudied mechanism that can help mitigate coordination failures in a geographically distributed organization. The chapter presents an organizing framework on how intra-firm geographic mobility creates value for firms and discusses how intra-firm geographic mobility can create value for individual workers. The chapter concludes by presenting a future research agenda for intra-firm geographic mobility in light of emerging phenomena such as global collaborative patenting by multinationals, temporary colocation of knowledge workers, and nonstandard work.

Details

Employee Inter- and Intra-Firm Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-550-5

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Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2015

Rochelle Haynes and Phil Almond

This chapter will discuss the extent to which existing models on expatriate functions within the international business literature, still effectively capture the roles…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter will discuss the extent to which existing models on expatriate functions within the international business literature, still effectively capture the roles currently performed by expatriate managers. It analyse the Edstrom and Galbraith (1977) typology and present a conceptual framework on the roles currently performed by expatriate managers within MNCs. To do this, it will draw inspiration from the resource-based view (Barney, 1991; Peng, M. W. (2001). The resource-based view and international business. Journal of Management, 27, 803–829. Wernerfelt, 1984), and the organisation capability view (Grant, 1996). Following several propositions about managers’ key functions within MNCs, challenges of creating an all-encompassing framework on expatriate functions, and suggestions for future research and theoretical development will be identified.

Methodology/approach

This chapter will present a conceptual framework on expatriate functions.

Originality/value

Four decades since Edstrom and Galbraith’s seminal work, international developments have continued to impress upon the way MNCs organise and manage their worldwide activities. Yet, as the business environment progresses, theoretical models examining how international development impact the functions undertaken by expatriate managers within MNCs individuals are still relatively scarce. Hence, this chapter aims to contribute to the theoretical advancement in the area of expatriate functions by highlighting possible changes and expansion of expatriate managers within the current global business context.

Details

The Future Of Global Organizing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-422-5

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Theresa Hammond, Christine Cooper and Chris J. van Staden

The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex and shifting relationship between the Anglo American Corporation (Anglo) and the South African State (“the State”) as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the complex and shifting relationship between the Anglo American Corporation (Anglo) and the South African State (“the State”) as reflected in Anglo’s annual reports.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on research on the role of annual reports in ideological conflict. To examine the ongoing relationship between Anglo and the State, the authors read all the annual reports published by Anglo American from 1917 to 1975, looking for instances in which the corporation appeared to be attempting to address, criticise, compliment, or implore the State.

Findings

During the period under study, despite the apparent struggles between the South African State and Anglo American, the relationship between the two was primarily symbiotic. The symbolic confrontation engaged in by these two behemoths perpetuated the real, physical violence perpetrated on the oppressed workers. By appearing to be a liberal opponent of apartheid, Anglo was able to ensure continued investment in South Africa.

Social implications

The examination of decades’ worth of annual reports provides an example of how these supposedly neutral instruments were used to contest and sustain power. Thereby, Anglo could continue to exploit workers, reap enormous profits, and maintain a fiction of opposition to the oppressive State. The State also benefited from its support of Anglo, which provided a plurality of tax revenue and economic expansion during the period.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights into the ways the State and other institutions sustain each other in the pursuit of economic and political power in the face of visible and widely condemned injustices. Although they frequently contested each other’s primacy, both benefited while black South African miners suffered.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

John G.I. Clarke

To encourage the ongoing transformation of the UN system by conceptualising leadership challenges within a cybernetics/systems paradigm.

Abstract

Purpose

To encourage the ongoing transformation of the UN system by conceptualising leadership challenges within a cybernetics/systems paradigm.

Design/methodology/approach

A grounded theory methodology was used to explore the “paradox of plenty” within the UN system in Southern Africa – how the system can more effectively metabolise the considerable latent creative synergic potential within it, to respond to the challenges of HIV/AIDS in Africa.

Findings

Statements from UN leaders call for a new paradigm of humanitarian assistance if the challenges of HIV and AIDS are to be met. However, conversations with a wide range of people both within the UN system and closely connected to it suggest a disconnect between what the system does and what the system espouses – a bias toward “doing things right” rather than “doing the right thing”. Drawing on the writings of Berry (eco‐spirituality), Beer (VSM), Argyris and Schon (double loop learning), Hock (chaordic organisation) and Ackoff (corporate planning) the sub‐optimal organisational performance is interpreted as an “autistic” condition, whereby organisations become “so locked up inside themselves that nothing and no one can get in”. Interactive dialogue with primary health care workers in Swaziland generated five interconnected principles for developing a systemic response to HIV and AIDS. These are proposed as “antidotes” to counteract autistic tendencies within the UN system.

Research limitations/implications

The principles are offered for discussion and refinement through further research by cyberneticians and systems thinkers.

Originality/value

If internalised by UN leadership the perplexing challenges that HIV/AIDS is posing could be met with renewed confidence and hope.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2014

Christine E. Murray, Jacquelyn White, Hamid Nemati, Anthony Chow, Allison Marsh and Samantha Edwards

Family Justice Centers, or “one-stop shops” that enable domestic violence victims to access a range of services at one location, are becoming increasingly common. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Family Justice Centers, or “one-stop shops” that enable domestic violence victims to access a range of services at one location, are becoming increasingly common. However, there is a limited body of research examining the outcomes and planning processes of these Centers. The early phases of planning Centers are critical to their initial and ongoing success. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 15 stakeholders in a community in the early phases of planning a Center were interviewed.

Findings

Content analysis procedures were used to identify themes related to participants’ ideas about what the Family Justice Center should look like (e.g. services to include and perceived benefits and challenges for the Center), the steps required for planning it (e.g. identifying the purpose of the Center, getting key people involved, and building collaborations), and desired technologies.

Originality/value

This paper is the first known research effort to examine the early phases of development in constructing a Family Justice Center.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Jennifer Bowerman

Abstract

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Georgios I. Zekos

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and…

Abstract

Investigates the differences in protocols between arbitral tribunals and courts, with particular emphasis on US, Greek and English law. Gives examples of each country and its way of using the law in specific circumstances, and shows the variations therein. Sums up that arbitration is much the better way to gok as it avoids delays and expenses, plus the vexation/frustration of normal litigation. Concludes that the US and Greek constitutions and common law tradition in England appear to allow involved parties to choose their own judge, who can thus be an arbitrator. Discusses e‐commerce and speculates on this for the future.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 46 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2017

Geoffrey K. Aligula, Chee Kuang Kok and Hock Kheng Sim

This paper aims to demonstrate how the five phases of design for six sigma approach as defined by define-measure-analyse-design-validate (DMADV) are adopted towards the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to demonstrate how the five phases of design for six sigma approach as defined by define-measure-analyse-design-validate (DMADV) are adopted towards the development of an optoelectronic product to address the unexplored development issues related to micron-scale tolerances of internal diameters in plastic moulded parts. In addition, the structured product development approach is used to address the critical-to-quality (CTQ) characteristics that define the quality of the final product.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with DMADV, the presented methodology used various tools at each development stage to address key requirements of critical concern in the project. This included the ideal use of computer-aided design (CAD) simulation tool to identify CTQ parameters, failure mode effect analysis as a predictive tool to identify the major defects, while adopting root-cause-analysis to identify the fundamental causes of the major defects, design of experiment, and statistical analysis using Minitab Software for data-driven decision-making.

Findings

The two major defects that hindered the mass production of quality products were eliminated, and the overall development of the product significantly improved. Additionally, a quality control strategy approach was implemented to “lock in” the quality.

Originality/value

The case study presented develops and adopts a structured approach from DMADV with the key focus of addressing a micron-scale tolerance conflict between the design and manufacturing tolerance requirements of an optoelectronic product. The uniqueness of the case study is the adoption and application of CAD simulation at the Define phase of the DMADV process to address the CTQ issue of the product developed.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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