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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Evelyn Teo Ai Lin, George Ofori, Imelda Tjandra and Hanjoon Kim

Despite recognition of its importance to Singapore’s economy, the construction industry is plagued by poor safety and productivity performance. Improvement efforts by the…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite recognition of its importance to Singapore’s economy, the construction industry is plagued by poor safety and productivity performance. Improvement efforts by the government and industry have yielded little results. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for developing a productivity and safety monitoring system using Building Information Modelling (BIM).

Design/methodology/approach

The framework, Intelligent Productivity and Safety System (IPASS), takes advantage of mandatory requirements for building plans to be submitted for approval in Singapore in BIM format. IPASS is based on a study comprising interviews and a questionnaire-based survey. It uses BIM to integrate buildable design, prevention and control of hazards, and safety assessment.

Findings

The authors illustrate a development of IPASS capable of generating productivity and safety scores for construction projects by analysing BIM model information.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates that BIM can be used to monitor productivity and safety as a project progresses, and help to enhance performance under the two parameters.

Practical implications

IPASS enables collaboration among project stakeholders as they can base their work on analysis of productivity and safety performance before projects start, and as they progress. It is suggested that the BIM model submitted to the authorities should be used for the IPASS application.

Originality/value

IPASS has rule-checking, hazards identification and quality checking capabilities. It is able to identify hazards and risks with the rule-checking capabilities. IPASS enables practitioners to check mistakes and the rationality of a design. It helps to mitigate risks as there are built-in safety measures/controls rules to overcome the problems caused by design deficiency, wrong-material-choice, and more.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2012

Abdul-Rashid Abdul-Aziz and George Ofori

From interviews with selected experts and secondary sources, this paper charts the actions that led to Malaysia having its own green building rating tool. It began with…

Abstract

From interviews with selected experts and secondary sources, this paper charts the actions that led to Malaysia having its own green building rating tool. It began with the Institution of Architects Malaysia and the Institution of Engineers Malaysia working together in 2008 to come up with the Green Building Index (GBI) specifically suited for the Malaysian condition. The index was launched a year later, the same year that a new prime minister came into office. With greening the economy in mind, he launched a few major initiatives, one of which was the creation of the Ministry of Energy, Green Technology and Water to replace the Ministry of Energy, Water and Communications and another was the launching of the National Technology Policy. In December 2009, he made the commitment on Malaysia's behalf to reduce carbon dioxide emission at the Copenhagen Summit, thereby cementing his commitment to green issues at the international level. Behind-the-scene lobbying by the private sector resulted in the government explicitly endorsing the GBI by tying GBI certification of buildings to financial incentives. This paper makes the case that the strong cooperation between the private sector and the government over the GBI represents a form of public-private partnership on aspects of collaborative spirit, complementarity of resources, private sector leadership, wide-ranging ramifications over other partnerships across time, timing and sustainability. Other countries intending to come up with their own rating tool can take stock of the Malaysian experience.

Details

Open House International, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1996

GEORGE OFORI

The construction programmes of developing countries have constituted a significant part of the international construction market. However, while international contractors…

Abstract

The construction programmes of developing countries have constituted a significant part of the international construction market. However, while international contractors seek to exploit these opportunities, the host nations also wish to develop their construction industries over time. This paper shows how conflicting objectives of international contractors and host countries can be correlated for mutual benefit. It outlines strategies adopted by international construction enterprises and contrasts the approaches they adopt in industrialised countries with those in developing ones. It then compares the objectives of international construction enterprises to those of host countries. It uses Singapore's experience to illustrate likely future developments in the construction industries of emerging countries. Finally, it offers suitable approaches that international and local construction enterprises, and governments, should adopt at various stages of development of host countries' construction industries.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1994

GEORGE OFORI

Construction industries in developing countries face many problems. One of these is the low level of their technological development. This paper considers how a national…

Abstract

Construction industries in developing countries face many problems. One of these is the low level of their technological development. This paper considers how a national technology policy can help improve the situation. After a brief discussion of technology and its development, construction technology development is considered. The nature of, and potential benefits from, technology policies are discussed. Ghana's experience and that of other countries in construction technology development are outlined. Courses of action for achieving progress are then indicated.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

GEORGE OFORI and SWEE LEAN CHAN

Construction companies have several possible growth paths to follow in their effort to develop. Studies show that the appropriate approach depends on the features of the…

Abstract

Construction companies have several possible growth paths to follow in their effort to develop. Studies show that the appropriate approach depends on the features of the company and the prevailing economic conditions, and support measures and incentives. This paper reports the results of a study on the paths which construction enterprises in Singapore have adopted since 1980. The main basis of the study was a mailed questionnaire survey. It was found that most local contractors have grown by working at home, either as main contractors or as specialist subcontractors. Some theoretical implications of the findings are outlined. Recommendations are offered on appropriate growth paths for Singaporean contractors under various circumstances.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

GEORGE OFORI, CHRISTOPHER LEONG and TEO PIN

The literature suggests that developing countries must use foreign construction enterprises to undertake much of the building and infrastructure projects which they…

Abstract

The literature suggests that developing countries must use foreign construction enterprises to undertake much of the building and infrastructure projects which they require for their economic development. Authors suggest that foreign firms can have various impacts, both positive and negative, on the construction industries of the host countries. This study examines the effect of the operations of foreign contractors in Singapore on their local counterparts and on the nation's construction industry. The study assesses the extent to which Singaporean construction companies have grown during the past two decades, and investigates the influence of foreign firms in this growth process. It is based on interviews of prominent construction practitioners and administrators. It was found that Singapore firms grew considerably during the period under review, and that foreign firms contributed to this growth. It is concluded that there is scope for mutually beneficial co‐operation among foreign and local contractors.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2000

WOON HONG LOH and GEORGE OFORI

The construction industries of many countries rely heavily on subcontracting. As a result, the quality of subcontractors is important as it has a direct bearing on the…

Abstract

The construction industries of many countries rely heavily on subcontracting. As a result, the quality of subcontractors is important as it has a direct bearing on the performance of the main contractor on projects. A large proportion of construction work in Singapore is subcontracted. Despite the well‐known and widely regretted deficiencies in the traditional subcontracting system, only recently have attempts been made to reform it. The most significant of these efforts is the Singapore List of Trade Subcontractors (SLOTS). This study sought to investigate whether or not the performance of subcontractors has been improved following the introduction of the SLOTS scheme. The research was based on a survey of project managers of main contractors. A major finding was that the SLOTS‐registered contractors were perceived to perform better than nonregistered ones. Suggestions for improving the SLOTS scheme are offered in this paper.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Shamas‐ur‐Rehman Toor and George Ofori

Researchers have traditionally focused on the technical and managerial features of construction projects and have tended to ignore the subject of leadership. However…

Abstract

Purpose

Researchers have traditionally focused on the technical and managerial features of construction projects and have tended to ignore the subject of leadership. However, recent interest in the subject has resulted in global research initiatives that aspire to provide an understanding of leadership in a holistic manner. To further the research on the subject, it is important to review the existing body of knowledge and draft a road map for the future. For this purpose, a review of empirical works on leadership in the construction industry was carried out.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 49 studies were selected through a rigorous process. To summarize the findings, coding was done according to publication outlet, authors, nature of study, country of publication, target population, methodology, and key findings.

Findings

It was found that most of the empirical studies have focused on behavioral dimensions of leadership while paying less attention to several other important dimensions, particularly leadership development. Most studies were cross‐sectional in nature and used quantitative methods of analysis. It was also noted that these studies focused on a limited range theories presented in the mainstream.

Originality/value

The review presented here summarizes the empirical research on leadership in the construction industry. The paper details various past trends, predicts some future trends, and suggests certain areas in which future research on leadership in the construction industry could focus.

Research limitations/implications

It is suggested that leadership studies need to be improved in terms of methodological approach, level of analysis, developmental perspective of leadership, and objective measurement of leadership outcomes.

Originality/value

The paper predicts some future trends and suggests certain areas in which future research on leadership in the construction industry could focus.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2000

FLORENCE YEAN‐YNG LING and GEORGE OFORI &SUI PHENG LOW

Architects and engineers (AE) need to possess both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills. Soft skills are important because AE interact in organizational settings instead of working by…

Abstract

Architects and engineers (AE) need to possess both ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ skills. Soft skills are important because AE interact in organizational settings instead of working by themselves. Soft skills may be grouped under ‘conscientiousness’, ‘initiative’, ‘social skills’, ‘controllability’ and ‘commitment’. As part of a larger study on the selection of consultants by design‐build (DB) contractors in Singapore, a survey was conducted to gauge whether contractors felt that soft skills are important for consultants to carry out their design tasks in DB projects. From the literature, attributes relating to these skills were identified. Data were collected via mailed questionnaire. The questionnaire requested respondents to indicate on a five‐point scale the importance of various soft skills. It was found that all the soft skills, which were operationalized into 14 attributes, are important factors that contractors look for when selecting consultants. It is, therefore, concluded that contextual performance is important and relevant.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2008

Shamas‐ur‐Rehman Toor and George Ofori

Recent research on leadership has focused on the exploration of the taxonomies of leadership antecedents (or “trigger events”) that significantly influence the development…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research on leadership has focused on the exploration of the taxonomies of leadership antecedents (or “trigger events”) that significantly influence the development of the attributes of leadership in individuals. These leadership antecedents – which may involve individuals, social institutions, and life experiences – constitute a worthwhile topic for research. This paper aims to report a study which explores the leadership antecedents that inspired leadership development among graduate project management students.

Design/methodology/approach

To ascertain the significance of leadership antecedents, a study was conducted at National University of Singapore. A questionnaire survey was used to collect data on taxonomies of various leadership antecedents which contributed to the development of leadership skills among the subjects. Of a total of 90 questionnaires, which were distributed, 58 completed questionnaires were received.

Findings

The results suggest that teachers, parents, and mentors are significant in the development of leadership among the emergent leaders. It was also noted that educational and occupational experiences play a central role in leadership development. Future studies can use qualitative approaches, especially grounded theory methodology, to develop comprehensive frameworks explaining leadership development process.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this exploratory study can form the basis for further work in the field of leadership development.

Originality/value

The taxonomy of leadership antecedents employed in this study can be used to design controlled interventions for leadership development in emergent project leaders and project management trainees.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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