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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

G.S. Sams

Provides a section by section guide to the compensation provisionsof the Planning and Compensation Act 1991. Concludes that pressure forfurther change will continue but…

Abstract

Provides a section by section guide to the compensation provisions of the Planning and Compensation Act 1991. Concludes that pressure for further change will continue but that the prospect of a consolidated compensation code now seems very remote.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

G.S. SAMS

It has long been established that when part of a parcel of land in one ownership is acquired compulsorily and the land which is retained is rendered less valuable as a…

Abstract

It has long been established that when part of a parcel of land in one ownership is acquired compulsorily and the land which is retained is rendered less valuable as a result the owner is entitled to compensation for that depreciation. The purpose of this article is to discuss whether a similar right to compensation arises where the land taken is itself rendered less valuable as a result of the severance.

Details

Journal of Valuation, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2019

Virginia Harrison

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) communications in business by merging previously unconnected lines of thought…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) communications in business by merging previously unconnected lines of thought in communications and law. Using Walmart as an example, the study shows that CSR communication can legitimize a corporation’s autonomous legal system of regulation and governance over its business practices.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study of all online corporate communications webpages from Walmart was examined. Discourse and qualitative analyses were used to show how language and online communications practices created actional legitimacy for Walmart’s CSR practices.

Findings

Using the UN’s Guiding Principles for Business as a framework for analysis, the study demonstrated how CSR communications helps Walmart to establish its own system of CSR norms, structures and remediation processes for its business outside of the state. These communications also sought to legitimize these actions among stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

This case study looks at one corporation (Walmart) to illustrate a new connection between CSR communication and legitimacy. Future research in communications can extend this line of inquiry by examining how communications can reinforce autonomous legal systems and public perceptions.

Originality/value

Backer’s (2007) autonomous legal system and the concept of actional legitimacy in communications have not yet been studied systematically. This case study demonstrates how CSR communications can legitimize a multinational corporation’s business practices, which, in turn, raises ethical considerations for the ways this communication serves the greater society.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

Louise Lovelady

It is rarely the case that a broader consideration of the available strategies for changing organisations is linked with empirical evidence on the way organisational…

Abstract

It is rarely the case that a broader consideration of the available strategies for changing organisations is linked with empirical evidence on the way organisational change occurs. The purpose of this article is to examine data on the OD consultant's role as currently performed and the way consultants facilitate change. However, the intention is to broaden the discussion by setting this specific data against a backcloth of the current strategies for implementing organisational change. By examining the OD consultant's role against the wider perspective, the content, strengths and weaknesses of the role and of OD may be better understood.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Esteban R. Brenes, Amitava Chattopadhyay and Daniel Montoya C.

The purpose of this case study is to describe the Costa Rican coffee roaster and retail company Grupo Britt and provides sufficient information for readers to discuss the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to describe the Costa Rican coffee roaster and retail company Grupo Britt and provides sufficient information for readers to discuss the company's growth options in the US and Latin American markets. It has been prepared to facilitate discussion and learning about appropriate growth strategies and the building, positioning and branding of companies from emerging economies within the internationalization processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study is based on primary research conducted in conjunction with the company, including interviews with senior management and an ample review of documents. Secondary research was also conducted into the relevant environmental, industry and competitor trends and characteristics.

Findings

The case presents the ways in which Grupo Britt has been successful in developing a new business model based on the concept of a “sense of place.” This translates as meaning that the company generates products and services that highlight the particular characteristics of the place(s) in which it operates.

Originality/value

This is a complex, in‐depth case study suitable for use with advanced MBA students and practitioners. Depending on the aims of the instructor, different aspects of the case can be highlighted and it can be used in a course or module focussing on strategies for growth or internationalization, international business or marketing, or brand management

Details

Academia Revista Latinoamericana de Administración, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1012-8255

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Manveer Mann, Sang-Eun Byun and Yishuang Li

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the range of realignment strategies employed by retailers in the USA in response to the 2008 economic recession.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the range of realignment strategies employed by retailers in the USA in response to the 2008 economic recession.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the grounded theory approach, National Retail Federation News Briefs published between 2008 and 2011 were analyzed by sorting them into thematic categories and comparing trends in strategic decisions during the recession (2008-2009) and after the recession (2010-2011). Based on the emergent categories, propositions were developed to provide theoretical explanations of the findings.

Findings

The authors found five thematic categories of realignment strategies: promotional, organizational, price, operational, and product realignments. In line with contingency theories, retailers used these strategies to achieve a greater fit with the altered business environment and consumer consumption patterns. While promotional realignment was most prevalent, followed by organizational realignment, different realignment strategies were pursued based on the strategic focus and long-term vs short-term orientation of the retailers.

Originality/value

The contribution of the findings is twofold: filling a critical gap in the literature examining the range of realignment decisions of the US retail industry in response to the recent economic recession; and enhancing the theoretical understanding of underlying factors or mechanisms of specific realignment decisions in the context of a turbulent economic environment.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Oswald A. Mascarenhas, Ram Kesavan and Michael Bernacchi

Traditional marketing strategies assume that customers involve (e.g. search, assess, purchase, use) with products or services mostly at the end of their value chain as…

Abstract

Traditional marketing strategies assume that customers involve (e.g. search, assess, purchase, use) with products or services mostly at the end of their value chain as finished market offerings. This article challenges managers to invite target customers to be involved at all stages of the value chain. The specific purpose of our new customer‐value‐chain involvement (CVCI) model is to enhance customer relationship management in conjunction with supply chain management, employee relationship management) and retailer partners’ relationship management. There are definite advantages to CVCI as it can provide continuous customer feedback and enable more objective quality assessment and judgment, but most importantly, it can elevate customer satisfaction to customer delight that spawns lifetime loyalty and positive referrals. The importance and managerial implications of CVCI are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2019

Youn-Kyung Kim, Sejin Ha and Soo-Hee Park

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify men’s clothing market segments based on store types and generational cohorts and the retail attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 2,808 US male consumer data from Predictive Analytics survey were analyzed with correspondence analysis (CA) (to identify segments based on store types and generations), general linear model (GLM) (to determine what retail attributes were important to target each segment) and a Rasch tree model (to test items of each factor in their relative importance).

Findings

The CA produced three segments: Segment 1 (Gen Y male consumers who frequently shop at specialty stores), Segment 2 (Gen X males who frequently shop at discount stores and online stores) and Segment 3 (Baby Boomers and Seniors who frequently shop at department stores). GLM shows that fundamentals were important to all segments; experiential was most important to Segment 1, while promotion was most important to Segment 3. Rasch tree analysis provided specific information on retail attributes for each store type and each generation.

Research limitations/implications

Future research could employ both the importance and performance of retail attributes that are measured on a rating scale to understand consumers’ attitudes toward each retail format.

Practical implications

This study provided men’s clothing retailers with current insights into the male consumer segments based upon generational cohorts and store types from which they can better develop appropriate positioning strategies to satisfy the needs of each segment.

Originality/value

This study addressed the men’s clothing market, a growing but largely ignored market in the clothing industry and the retail literature.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Michael F. Smith

Urban versus suburban shopping environments present unique opportunities and challenges for retailers. Retailers in both urban and suburban locations attempt to both…

Abstract

Urban versus suburban shopping environments present unique opportunities and challenges for retailers. Retailers in both urban and suburban locations attempt to both attract outshoppers and retain their hold on shoppers in their immediate trade areas. To this end, it is incumbent on retailers to understand the dynamics underlying consumers’ decisions to shop in urban versus suburban retailing settings. This is especially important for consumer shopping behavior during the December holiday selling season which accounts for a disproportionate share of many retailers’ yearly revenues and profits. Reports on a three‐year study conducted in a major metropolitan area which addresses shopping behaviour, intentions, retail satisfaction and its antecedents between urban resident shoppers and suburban resident shoppers. Implications are presented for retailers who have chosen to emphasize strategically urban or suburban locations as well as for those retailers who have branch stores in both geographic locations.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Celso Augusto de Matos, Valter Vieira, Katia Bonfanti and Frederike Monika Budiner Mette

The purpose of this is to propose a model in which materialism is a mediator of the effects of self-esteem, impulsiveness, attitude toward debt, attitude toward credit…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this is to propose a model in which materialism is a mediator of the effects of self-esteem, impulsiveness, attitude toward debt, attitude toward credit card and economic vulnerability on consumer indebtedness. The effects of financial knowledge, financial ability, credit card use and demographic variables are also taken into account.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data from a sample of 1,245 low-income consumers from Brazil were used to test the hypotheses using structural equation modeling.

Findings

First, materialism has a significant effect on consumer indebtedness; at the same time, it is influenced by self-esteem, impulsiveness and attitude toward debt. Second, materialism acts as a mediator, e.g. higher impulsiveness triggers materialism, which influences debt level. Third, indebtedness is higher for women and those who use a higher number of credit cards and are more educated.

Social implications

Financial education programs should work to increase individual’s perceived ability to manage money, as the individuals who feel less able to manage their personal finances alone (i.e. lower financial ability) presented higher indebtedness.

Originality/value

This study investigates consumer indebtedness by addressing factors that have been analyzed independently in the literature. The research combines psychological, financial and economic factors with credit card use and demographic variables to explain consumer indebtedness. Moreover, the study supports the mediating role of materialism for the antecedents of consumer indebtedness, e.g. impulsiveness and attitude toward debt.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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