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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

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The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2019

Brian R. Dineen, Greet Van Hoye, Filip Lievens and Lindsay Mechem Rosokha

Massive shifts in the recruitment landscape, the continually changing nature of work and workers, and extraordinary technological progress have combined to enable…

Abstract

Massive shifts in the recruitment landscape, the continually changing nature of work and workers, and extraordinary technological progress have combined to enable unparalleled advances in how current and prospective employees receive and process information about organizations. Once the domain of internal organizational public relations and human resources (HR) teams, most employment branding has moved beyond organizations’ control. This chapter provides a conceptual framework pertaining to third party employment branding, defined as communications, claims, or status-based classifications generated by parties outside of direct company control that shape, enhance, and differentiate organizations’ images as favorable or unfavorable employers. Specifically, the authors first theorize about the underlying mechanisms by which third party employment branding might signal prospective and current employees. Second, the authors develop a framework whereby we comprehensively review third party employment branding sources, thus identifying the different ways that third party employment branding might manifest. Third, using prototypical examples, the authors link the various signaling mechanisms to the various third party employment branding sources identified. Finally, the authors propose an ambitious future research agenda that considers not only the positive aspects of third party employment branding but also potential “dark sides.” Thus, the authors view this chapter as contributing to the broader employment branding literature, which should enhance scholarly endeavors to study it and practitioner efforts to leverage it.

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Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-852-0

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Article
Publication date: 8 November 2013

Kusum Mundra

This paper revisits the derivation and properties of the Allen-Uzawa and Morishima elasticities. Using a Swiss dataset, this paper empirically estimates various…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper revisits the derivation and properties of the Allen-Uzawa and Morishima elasticities. Using a Swiss dataset, this paper empirically estimates various elasticities both in a dual and primal framework using a production theory open economy model and tests for linear homogenous technology. In addition to reporting elasticity at the mean, the standard practice in the literature, this paper also calculates nonparametric distribution of various elasticities. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To assess the effect of price change on input, the paper estimates a translog cost function and to assess the effect of quantity change on price, the paper estimates the translog distance function using the data on Swiss economy. The paper estimates Allen-Uzawa and Morishima elasticity both under homogenous and non-homogenous technology using the Swiss dataset of one aggregate gross output and four inputs (resident labor, non-resident labor, imports, and capital) over 1950-1986. Elasticities are reported and compared at the mean as well as explored by looking at the range and nonparametric distribution.

Findings

This paper shows that constant returns to scale are easily rejected in this dataset and that the elasticities, both qualitatively and quantitatively, are very different under homogenous and non-homogenous technology. These elasticities can switch from complements to substitutes or vice versa when one moves away from the mean of the sample. The equality of the nonparametric elasticity distributions under homogenous vs non-homogenous technology is rejected in all cases except one.

Originality/value

This paper gives a clear derivation and interpretation of different elasticities as well as demonstrates using a dataset how to systematically go about empirically estimating these elasticities in a dual and primal framework. It shows that linear homogenous technology can be easily rejected and the elasticities, both quantitatively and qualitatively, are very different under homogenous and non-homogenous technology. This paper is also very valuable because it shows that the standard practice of reporting elasticity at the mean might not be adequate and there is a possibility that these elasticities can switch from complements to substitutes or vice versa when one moves away from the mean of the sample.

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Indian Growth and Development Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8254

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Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2009

W. Erwin Diewert

The chapter reviews and extends the theory of exact and superlative index numbers. Exact index numbers are empirical index number formula that are equal to an underlying…

Abstract

The chapter reviews and extends the theory of exact and superlative index numbers. Exact index numbers are empirical index number formula that are equal to an underlying theoretical index, provided that the consumer has preferences that can be represented by certain functional forms. These exact indexes can be used to measure changes in a consumer's cost of living or welfare. Two cases are considered: the case of homothetic preferences and the case of nonhomothetic preferences. In the homothetic case, exact index numbers are obtained for square root quadratic preferences, quadratic mean of order r preferences, and normalized quadratic preferences. In the nonhomothetic case, exact indexes are obtained for various translog preferences.

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Book part
Publication date: 29 May 2009

William A. Barnett and Apostolos Serletis

This chapter is an up-to-date survey of the state-of-the art in consumer demand analysis. We review (and evaluate) advances in a number of related areas, in the spirit of…

Abstract

This chapter is an up-to-date survey of the state-of-the art in consumer demand analysis. We review (and evaluate) advances in a number of related areas, in the spirit of the recent survey paper by Barnett and Serletis (2008). In doing so, we only deal with consumer choice in a static framework, ignoring a number of important issues, such as, the effects of demographic or other variables that affect demand, welfare comparisons across households (equivalence scales), and the many issues concerning aggregation across consumers.

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Quantifying Consumer Preferences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-313-2

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Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Philip Miles

Abstract

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Midlife Creativity and Identity: Life into Art
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-333-1

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Article
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Malayka Klimchak, A.K. Ward Bartlett and William MacKenzie

The purpose of this study is to explore factors that help to determine employee trust in and affective commitment toward the organization.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore factors that help to determine employee trust in and affective commitment toward the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected using surveys administered to employees of a company located in the southeastern United States. The final sample included 391 matched supervisor–subordinate dyads.

Findings

We found organizational signals of trustworthiness led to affective commitment through increased levels of employee trust. Employees and supervisors who perceived HR professionals to be competent, who felt organizational information distributions were of high quality and who felt the organization disclosed relevant information exhibited higher levels of trust in the organization. Employees showed higher affective commitment when they trusted the organization. We found that supervisor trust directly impacted subordinate affective commitment as well.

Originality/value

These findings help extend signaling theory from the attraction of employees to their retention and help researchers and practitioners alike to understand the organizational trust- and commitment-building process.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 49 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Michael G. Allen, Alexander R. Oliver and Edward H. Schwallie

Acquisitions activity in the United States is more intense today than at any time since the 1960s. Among the trends in today's acquisitions market: larger acquisitions…

Abstract

Acquisitions activity in the United States is more intense today than at any time since the 1960s. Among the trends in today's acquisitions market: larger acquisitions, many over $200 million; the changing mix of companies involved; and a switch to cash payment and higher premiums. Cutting through the acquisitions maze requires sound strategic planning.

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Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1951

D. Rendel and G.R. Allen

IN addition to the completely separated air which may be trapped in a hydraulic system, air may also exist in close association with the fluid in either of two states, namely:

Abstract

IN addition to the completely separated air which may be trapped in a hydraulic system, air may also exist in close association with the fluid in either of two states, namely:

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Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 23 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Mohsen Afsharian, Heinz Ahn and Ludmila Neumann

The determination of input and output factors is a well-known source of pitfalls when applying data envelopment analysis (DEA). The purpose of this paper is to contribute…

Abstract

Purpose

The determination of input and output factors is a well-known source of pitfalls when applying data envelopment analysis (DEA). The purpose of this paper is to contribute to overcome the respective problems of input/output factor determination related to factor selection, dual-role factors and undesirable factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The problems of input/output factor determination are discussed from a goal-oriented perspective, shedding a new light on the role of input/output factors in DEA. This is exemplified by the case of measuring pharmacy stores’ efficiency concerning their goal of customer retention.

Findings

The findings suggest to applying a generalized DEA (GDEA). The three steps of this approach include the development of a system of objectives, the derivation of corresponding performance criteria as well as the construction of cost and benefit functions. These functions build the basis for GDEA models, of which one is exemplarily described and applied to the customer retention case.

Research limitations/implications

While traditional DEA implicitly assumes linear cost and benefit functions, GDEA requires to explicitly specifying these functions. In doing so, the approach contributes to solve the problem of factor selection, the problem of dual-role factors and the problem of undesirable factors.

Practical implications

For determining input/output factors in a consistent and transparent manner, it is recommended to apply GDEA in practical benchmarking studies.

Originality/value

GDEA integrates well-known concepts of multi-criteria decision making into traditional DEA. The new approach helps to cope with the challenges of input/output factor determination in DEA.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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