Search results

1 – 10 of 67
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

G. Steven McMillan, Bastien St-Louis Lalonde, Frank H. Bezzina and Debra L. Casey

The Triple Helix model of academia, government and industry posits that the university can play an important role, even an entrepreneurial one, in innovation in…

Downloads
113

Abstract

Purpose

The Triple Helix model of academia, government and industry posits that the university can play an important role, even an entrepreneurial one, in innovation in increasingly knowledge-based societies (Etzkowitz and Leydesdorff, 2000). No longer the “ivory tower” universities are now moving toward an entrepreneurial paradigm. The purpose of this research effort is to examine how such a migration has been accomplished in Malta with a particular focus on the changing activities of its University.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses advanced bibliometric techniques to examine the scientific output of the University of Malta. Data were downloaded from Thomson Reuters Web of Science. These data were then processed using the software packages Bibexcel and VOSviewer to produce detailed maps of the scientific activity.

Findings

The results were that the University has greatly expanded its scientific footprint since its 2004 accession to the European Union (EU). International collaborations and highly cited papers have gone up significantly.

Research limitations/implications

Only one country was examined in this effort, and further study should compare to Malta to other small EU countries. The findings suggest that while some might consider Malta’s progress modest in absolute terms, it has made significant strides from its prior-to-accession base.

Practical implications

The findings have been presented to the Malta Council for Science and Technology as evidence of the outcomes of their efforts.

Originality/value

Because Malta is the smallest member-state in the EU, little research has been done on its science base. However, the authors believe their findings could inform research efforts on other EU, and even non-EU, countries.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2010

G. Steven McMillan and Debra L. Casey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and development of industrial relations as a field of study. This paper employs bibliometric and social network analyses…

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine the nature and development of industrial relations as a field of study. This paper employs bibliometric and social network analyses to examine the scholarly work published in the top industrial relations journals over the past 40 years. By examining the citation and co-citation patterns at the journal level and the article level, it is possible to empirically describe the field of industrial relations in terms of its parameters and its “paradigms” – the generally agreed on sets of research questions and methodologies – at different time periods throughout its development. Our findings illustrate that the intellectual base of the industrial relations field has moved from a more traditional, applied labor economics view of industrial relations to a broader “employment relations” view of the field.

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-932-9

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2010

Abstract

Details

Advances in Industrial and Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-932-9

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 27 October 2016

Alexandra L. Ferrentino, Meghan L. Maliga, Richard A. Bernardi and Susan M. Bosco

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications…

Abstract

This research provides accounting-ethics authors and administrators with a benchmark for accounting-ethics research. While Bernardi and Bean (2010) considered publications in business-ethics and accounting’s top-40 journals this study considers research in eight accounting-ethics and public-interest journals, as well as, 34 business-ethics journals. We analyzed the contents of our 42 journals for the 25-year period between 1991 through 2015. This research documents the continued growth (Bernardi & Bean, 2007) of accounting-ethics research in both accounting-ethics and business-ethics journals. We provide data on the top-10 ethics authors in each doctoral year group, the top-50 ethics authors over the most recent 10, 20, and 25 years, and a distribution among ethics scholars for these periods. For the 25-year timeframe, our data indicate that only 665 (274) of the 5,125 accounting PhDs/DBAs (13.0% and 5.4% respectively) in Canada and the United States had authored or co-authored one (more than one) ethics article.

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-973-2

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 March 2016

Martin Leary, Richard Piola, Jeff Shimeta, Steven Toppi, Scott Mayson, Matthew McMillan and Milan Brandt

Biofouling of marine vessels results in significant operational costs, as well as the bio-security risk associated with the transport of marine pests. Biofouling is…

Abstract

Purpose

Biofouling of marine vessels results in significant operational costs, as well as the bio-security risk associated with the transport of marine pests. Biofouling is particularly rapid in sea-chest water intakes due to elevated temperatures and circulating flow. Inspection challenges are exacerbated, as sea chests are difficult to inspect and clean. This paper aims to present a method that utilises the flexibility and low-batch capabilities of additive manufacture to manufacture custom sea-chest inserts that eliminate circulating flow and increase the uniformity of shear stress distributions to enable more constant ablation of anti-biofouling coatings.

Design/methodology/approach

An automated design procedure has been developed to optimise sea-chest insert geometry to achieve desirable flow characteristics, while eliminating the necessity for support material in FDM manufacture – thereby significantly reducing build cost and time.

Findings

Numerical flow simulation confirms that the fluid-flow approximation is robust for optimising sea-chest insert geometry. Insert geometry can be manipulated to enable support-free additive manufacture; however, as the threshold angle for support-free manufacture increases, the set of feasible sea-chest aspect ratios decreases.

Research limitations/implications

The surface of revolution that defines the optimal insert geometry may result in features that are not compatible with additive manufacture constraints. An alternate geometry is proposed that may be more useful in practice without compromising anti-biofouling properties.

Practical implications

Marine sea-chest biofouling results in significant negative environmental and economic consequence. The method developed in this paper can reduce the negative impact of sea-chest biofouling.

Social implications

Marine sea-chest biofouling results in significant resource consumption and emissions. The method developed in this paper can reduce the negative impact of sea-chest biofouling.

Originality/value

The method presented in this paper provides an entirely original opportunity to utilise additive manufacture to mitigate the effects of marine biofouling.

Click here to view access options
Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

James Shein and Loredana Yamada

Sara Lee Corporation's acquisition binge in the 1980s and 1990s left the company with a portfolio of vastly different businesses operating independently of one another. It…

Abstract

Sara Lee Corporation's acquisition binge in the 1980s and 1990s left the company with a portfolio of vastly different businesses operating independently of one another. It had experienced rapid top-line growth, but at the same time cash flows had declined. Sara Lee ignored both internal and external warning signs until a major transformation plan became necessary. This case examines the company's multiple turnaround attempts. The learning objective of the case is to analyze “early stage” turnaround efforts by examining how the company found itself in decline, evaluating its attempts to improve its performance, and assessing the turnaround plan.

(1) Learn to identify a specific challenging moment when reading and analyzing a turnaround plan; (2) address the implementation problems of an early stage turnaround and discuss exit options; (3) evaluate when a change of long-held beliefs and decades-long strategy by a company is warranted; (4) evaluate Sara Lee's marketing strategies in light of the disappointed retail and wholesale customers; and (5) show the similarities in traits between turnaround managers and high-growth entrepreneurs.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Marc Buelens and Steven A.Y. Poelmans

This study contributes to the literature on workaholism by testing the Spence and Robbins workaholic triad; 5,853 full time workers participated in a national survey on…

Downloads
2762

Abstract

This study contributes to the literature on workaholism by testing the Spence and Robbins workaholic triad; 5,853 full time workers participated in a national survey on working hours, covering a broad range of economic sectors and employment categories. Respondents were grouped eight clusters. Results show a strong similarity with those of other studies about the validity of the Spence and Robbins' typology. The same basic dimensions and the same types are identified, and similar relationships with extra‐work activities are found. In addition, a wide range of biographical, motivational and organizational data are included. One new type of workaholic was identified: the reluctant hard worker reports relatively long working hours, at a relatively low hierarchical level, with a strong perception of external pressure and a low perception of growth culture and a strong intention to leave the organization.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

Click here to view access options

Abstract

Details

Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Steven A. Gedeon

The purpose of this paper is to identify and apply best practices in university entrepreneurship education to the creation of a new MBA in entrepreneurship and innovation…

Downloads
1378

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and apply best practices in university entrepreneurship education to the creation of a new MBA in entrepreneurship and innovation management. It is a direct response to calls for a total re-envisioning of entrepreneurship education and criticism that existing programs lack rigour, content, pedagogy, measurement and an established definition.

Design/methodology/approach

This article uses reviews of the literature to identify normative best practices and how to apply them to the new program. An entrepreneurship program design framework (EPDF) was created and applied to a new MBA program being developed in central Germany.

Findings

Most studies describe aspects of current programs (e.g. lists of courses) but almost none say what should be in a program. Others provide abstract guidance (e.g. programs should define entrepreneurship) but do not give specific recommendations (e.g. what the definition should be). The proposed EPDF provided a rigorous structure for reviewing the literature, designing the new program and establishing specific best practice recommendations for defining program goals, content, pedagogy and measurement of student transformation.

Research limitations/implications

The entrepreneurship literature is largely silent on normative best practice guidance, so the proposed application of best practices should be evaluated in that context.

Originality/value

Previous articles present relatively abstract frameworks and concepts, whereas this article is a direct application of the practical implications of these concepts. The proposed normative best practice guidelines may be somewhat controversial, but should stimulate useful discussion.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Click here to view access options

Abstract

Details

Advances in Librarianship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-12024-617-5

1 – 10 of 67