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Article

Muruganantham G., Suresh Paul Antony and Esther Princess George

The study aims to understand the signaling effects of two major recruitment advertisement (ad) contents – job attributes and organizational attributes (OA) – on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to understand the signaling effects of two major recruitment advertisement (ad) contents – job attributes and organizational attributes (OA) – on the perceptions and application intentions (AIs) of potential job seekers.

Design/methodology/approach

A fictitious faculty job ad based on existing real ads was created as a stimulus and the responses to the ad were collected from 270 job seekers of the academic domain in India. The partial least square-structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothetical relationships.

Findings

Drawing from the concept of signaling theory and instrumental-symbolic framework, the results revealed that job attributes and OA exhibit strong signals that generate the following perceptual outcomes in a job seeker – organizational attractiveness, attitude and person-organization fit. These perceptual outcomes mediated effectively to induce an AI in a job seeker. Signals from information on job attributes had a more significant effect on the job seeker than signals from information on OA.

Practical implications

The outcome of the study provides preparatory guidelines to academicians, institutional recruiters and recruitment agencies in posting an effective job ad.

Originality/value

From an Indian context, this is the first paper to present distinctive job advertising strategies to be implemented in the academic institutional recruitment communication.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

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Article

G. Muruganantham and K. Priyadharshini

The purpose of this paper is to review existing literature related to private label brands (PLBs) and to identify the antecedents and consequences involved in the private…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review existing literature related to private label brands (PLBs) and to identify the antecedents and consequences involved in the private brand purchase.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a systematic review approach and identified 92 significant published articles between 1960 and 2016 for evaluation using SCOPUS database exclusively in the field of marketing. The journals that have published articles on purchase intention of PLBs are taken into consideration.

Findings

The authors provide a holistic framework on the purchasing behaviour of PLBs. The antecedents that emerged out of the most frequently studied factors are grouped as determinants of store brand proneness. The factors of consequences were categorised into loyalty factors along with the moderating variables as product category and retailer related attributes. These findings will serve as a twofold guide to retailers, i.e., help them gain an understanding of the target consumer group characteristics and design strategies to enhance the purchase of private label products.

Research limitations/implications

This investigation considers only published research papers bearing the title of PLBs purchase.

Originality/value

This study is the first attempt of its kind of systematically reviewing the antecedents and consequences of PLB consumers. Both relevant published research and emerging research issues in the field of consumer research have been identified with a view to foster future research needs.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Content available
Article

Paraskevi P. Sarantidou

This paper aims to explain variations in store brand penetration using trust. It aims to help both retailers and manufacturers predict store brand purchases through an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain variations in store brand penetration using trust. It aims to help both retailers and manufacturers predict store brand purchases through an improved understanding of the impact of trust in store brands across 10 different store brand product categories and among nine different grocery retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a telephone survey of 904 participants responsible for the household grocery shopping with a quota of 100 respondents from each of the nine leading grocery retailers in Greece.

Findings

The findings provide empirical support that store brand purchases are positively influenced by the consumers’ perceived level of trust toward the retailer’s store brands. Results also confirmed variations in store brand penetration across the ten product categories that were tested, variations among the retailers and variations in the level of trust.

Originality/value

This paper is adding to the store brand literature from a quantitative perspective and is contributing to the theory, as there is no clear theoretical view on the effect of trust on store brand purchases.

Propósito

El objetivo de este artículo es explicar las variaciones que se producen en la adopción y penetración de la marca de distribución a partir de la confianza que los consumidores depositan en esta. Con ello se pretende ayudar tanto a los distribuidores como a los fabricantes en la predicción de las compras de marcas de distribución a través del impacto de la confianza en diez categorías de producto distintas y diferentes cadenas de distribución de alimentación.

Diseño/metodología/enfoque

Se recogen datos a través de encuestas telefónicas a una muestra de 904 individuos responsables de la compra de productos de alimentación en el hogar distribuidos equitativamente entre las nueve marcas líderes de distribución alimentaria en Grecia.

Resultados

Los resultados empíricos obtenidos apoyan el planteamiento del trabajo de que las compras de marcas de distribución están influidas positivamente por el nivel de confianza que los consumidores manifiestan hacia las mismas. Los resultados también confirman que la variación en el grado de penetración de las marcas de distribución en las distintas categorías de productos y cadenas de supermercados analizadas viene explicada por las variaciones en los niveles de confianza manifestados.

Originalidad/valor

Este trabajo contribuye a la literatura de las marcas de distribución no sólo en aspectos teóricos sino también empíricos al no existir hasta la fecha un posicionamiento teórico claro sobre el efecto de la confianza en la adquisición de las marcas de distribución.

Details

Spanish Journal of Marketing - ESIC, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-9709

Keywords

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Article

Brigitte Planken, Catherine Nickerson and Subrat Sahu

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer responses to CSR in a developed and emerging economy (The Netherlands and India).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate consumer responses to CSR in a developed and emerging economy (The Netherlands and India).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey of 95 consumers in each country to investigate attitudes to CSR platforms and CSR initiatives and responses to CSR‐based marketing strategies (in terms of attitude to the company and purchasing intent).

Findings

The study found similar attitudes across nationalities to both CSR platforms and CSR initiatives, with greater importance assigned to CSR reflecting legal and ethical (rather than philanthropic) concerns. (Some) CSR‐based marketing strategies, reflecting an ethical (people/planet) concern, led to significantly more positive attitudes to the company and higher purchasing intent. The study found some cross‐cultural variation in the extent to which different CSR‐based marketing strategies influenced consumer outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study, limited to highly educated consumers. The study provides indications that stakeholder expectations in emerging and developed economies may be more similar than previously suggested. The philanthropic platform conventionally pursued in Indian business may not be the most effective way to engage (all segments of) Indian consumers. Findings suggest it is important that companies monitor stakeholders' CSR attitudes to ensure that CSR policy orientations meet stakeholder expectations.

Originality/value

This paper uses an innovative approach to investigate responses to CSR policy and communications. CSR research on emerging economies is underrepresented in the literature. The findings suggest areas of further enquiry with implications for global business.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Benedetta Grandi, Maria Grazia Cardinali and Silvia Bellini

The wide literature about healthy behaviours posits that a high level of self-control is required in order to make healthy choices. This work intends to demonstrate that…

Abstract

Purpose

The wide literature about healthy behaviours posits that a high level of self-control is required in order to make healthy choices. This work intends to demonstrate that retailers, through the management of in-store marketing levers, can influence shopping behaviour, no matter which is the individual tendency to engage in cognitive behaviours. For this specific purpose, we have considered participants' “Need for Cognition” as a proxy of self-control.

Design/methodology/approach

With reference to a specific category (cookies), we created a new display based on benefits (healthy eating) rather than products' attributes. A pre-test was conducted before the main experiment in order to assess the potential ability of the new nutritional display to help customers selecting healthier products, by testing participants' awareness and comprehension of the stimuli proposed. Then, an online between-subjects experiment was conducted by simulating the shoppers' expedition in the cookies' aisle inside a store with the aim to demonstrate that healthy choices can be also made on impulse.

Findings

Our findings showed that when both communication and visual cues are provided, people low in need for cognition (NFC) are more willing to select healthy products from the shelf, compared with people high in NFC.

Originality/value

While there is a wide literature explaining the mechanisms supporting healthy choices, fewer are the contributions about the role of retailers in promoting healthy eating through in-store marketing levers. More important, there is no contribution about how to promote health among people with low level of self-control.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Cherouk Amr Yassin and Ana Maria Soares

Food waste and retail losses due to expiration dates are an important problem worldwide. Expiration date-based pricing (EDBP) is a price promotion technique consisting of…

Abstract

Purpose

Food waste and retail losses due to expiration dates are an important problem worldwide. Expiration date-based pricing (EDBP) is a price promotion technique consisting of charging different prices for perishable product approaching expiration date. The authors explore the influence of EDBP on impulse buying (IB) and on cognitive dissonance.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall intercept survey in Egypt was used to test the proposed model.

Findings

The results show that, while EDBP does not affect IB, it impacts cognitive dissonance. In addition, cognitive IB impacts cognitive dissonance, while affective IB does not.

Practical implications

Results suggest that there is a need to reconsider the effects of EDBP and call for alternative strategies to promote products approaching its expiration date, including strategies based on environmental protection by reducing waste arguments rather than on the sales promotional framework.

Originality/value

In spite of the importance of understanding consumer behaviour with perishable goods, this topic has taken little or no attention in the literature. The results provide useful insights for understanding EDBP.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Léopold Lessassy

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of brand preference and type of shopping trip on the relationship between replacing a delisted national brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating effect of brand preference and type of shopping trip on the relationship between replacing a delisted national brand (NB) with a retailer’s private label (PL) brand (premium vs standard) and private label switching (PLS), that is switching from NB to PL.

Design/methodology/approach

Inside a major French retail chain store, an experiment with 1,392 NB buyers tested the impact of replacing NB with PL on PLS.

Findings

Results stress the positive contribution of PL replacements after NB delisting on buyers’ switching behaviour at different brand preference levels and shopping trip types. A main-choice NB for a major trip shopping benefits a PLS to premium PL. However, when a fill-in shopper looks for a secondary brand, competition between PL standard and NB may not be as weak as suggested in earlier studies.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study is that respondents reported their purchases instead of actually buying.

Practical implications

This study highlights that the retailers that delist some NB brands in the category should adopt a strategy either to develop premium or standard PLs, depending on consumers’ brand preference and shopping trip type.

Social implications

Delisting is an opportunity to question the NB product competitiveness towards PL.

Originality/value

The study is based on actual delisting and replacement, combined with a large sample, unlike previous studies. Moreover, it bridges two important areas of research: conflict in marketing channels and PL introduction in retailers’ assortment decisions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Sita Mishra, Gunjan Malhotra and Garima Saxena

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of in-store private label marketing to impact the attitude of consumers towards private label brands (PLBs) by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of in-store private label marketing to impact the attitude of consumers towards private label brands (PLBs) by influencing consumers' perceived quality variations between the PLBs and national brands.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on “Cue utilisation theory” and focusses on how retailers can influence consumers' perception of quality variations by providing them in-store marketing cues. Data was collected through the mall intercept method in New Delhi, India. Data analysis was done using AMOS 25 and the PROCESS SPSS macro.

Findings

This study establishes the effect of in-store private label marketing in improving consumers' quality perception of PLBs vis-à-vis national brands and thereby leading to a positive attitude towards PLBs. Further, the national brand promotions attitude is found to moderate the relationship between private label marketing and attitude towards PLBs. However, contrary to the authors' expectations, it has a positive effect on this relationship. The study found an insignificant moderation influence of price consciousness.

Originality/value

This study complements existing literature on “Cue utilisation theory” by demonstrating the importance of in-store private label marketing in improving consumers' attitudes towards PLBs. It also extends to fill some gaps in the literature by studying the direct, mediating and moderating relationship among in-store private label marketing, perceived quality variations, price consciousness, national brand promotion attitude and attitude towards PLBs, especially in an emerging market such as India.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article

Aylin Cakanlar and Tram Nguyen

This study aims to expand the understanding of impulse buying behavior by looking further into the role of culture in cross-cultural contexts.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to expand the understanding of impulse buying behavior by looking further into the role of culture in cross-cultural contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-cultural questionnaire was administered across three countries, namely, Sweden, Turkey and Vietnam.

Findings

Culture impacts impulse buying behavior of subjects with different cultural backgrounds. However, the findings also indicate that other factors may affect impulse buying behavior.

Originality/value

The cultural role on impulse buying was brought up by a few researchers in the literature, but Hofstede’s model of four cultural dimensions and their relationship to impulse buying behavior is tested for the first time in the literature across three different countries: Sweden, Turkey and Vietnam, which, respectively, represent northern Europe, southern Europe/a part of West Asia and South East Asia.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

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Article

Ying Ho, Long W. Lam and Desmond Lam

This study aims to explore the influence of casino servicescape on unplanned gaming behaviors by examining the mediating role of casino customers’ perceived behavioral…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the influence of casino servicescape on unplanned gaming behaviors by examining the mediating role of casino customers’ perceived behavioral control (i.e. perceived internal and external control).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 475 casino customers using street intercept survey. Multiple regression analysis was used to evaluate the mediating role of perceived behavioral control.

Findings

Results show a negative indirect effect of casino servicescape evaluation on customers’ unplanned gaming behaviors through perceived internal control. Moreover, casino customers’ perceived external control does not mediate the relationship between casino servicescape evaluation and unplanned gaming behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Findings suggest that a favorable casino servicescape may enhance customers’ perception of control over their personal resources (e.g. skills and knowledge), which in turn facilitate self-regulation of their unplanned gaming behaviors. The findings are limited to Chinese casino customers, and researchers should further validate the results for non-Chinese casino patrons.

Practical implications

To casino operators, results suggest that the Friedman-style casino design (i.e. compact gambling areas and low ceilings) potentially encourages unplanned gaming behaviors of casino customers. From social-policy perspective, governments can create effective responsible gaming programs by enhancing casino customers’ perceived internal control.

Originality/value

This study illuminates the process that connects casino servicescape with unplanned gaming behavior by explicitly testing the mediating role of customers’ perceived behavioral control. Moreover, it examines unplanned gaming behaviors of leisure gamblers who represent the mass gaming population.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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