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Book part
Publication date: 2 February 2000

P. Bingley and G. Lanot

Abstract

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Panel Data and Structural Labour Market Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-319-0

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Book part
Publication date: 2 February 2000

Abstract

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Panel Data and Structural Labour Market Models
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-44450-319-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Arnaud Chevalier, Claire Finn, Colm Harmon and James Heckman

This article illustrates the key findings from the economics literature on education investment, in particular the findings focused on early child investment. The article…

Abstract

This article illustrates the key findings from the economics literature on education investment, in particular the findings focused on early child investment. The article shows the impact of early investment, particularly evidence from experimental programmes on later life outcomes such as labour market performance and societal position. It demonstrates how investment in children is both an important investment for the child but also an important tool for economic and social policy.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2013

Brian M. Lucey, Yulia Plaksina and Michael Dowling

The paper aims to examine whether and under what circumstances social status of chief executives can be associated with corporate financial decisions, in particular via…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine whether and under what circumstances social status of chief executives can be associated with corporate financial decisions, in particular via risk aversion or risk loving to the extent of mergers and acquisitions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use mixed methods, drawing metrics of social status (acquired and ascribed) from anthropological and sociological research, applying these, and then using panel econometrics to check the statistical importance of the uncovered relationships.

Findings

The authors find in the paper that it is possible, for FTSE companies, to successfully measure and apply measures of social status from public records; they find strong evidence of a negative relationship between CEO ascribed and achieved social status and his or her acquisitiveness. However, the influence of achieved status appears to be more consistent and significant than that of the ascribed status, indicating its dominant role in determining overall attained status.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited in its data coverage, to FTSE members. However, it does show that it is possible to take useful and meaningful concepts from areas quite removed from traditional finance and to incorporate these into a traditional finance methodology.

Practical implications

The paper has practical implications for both aspirant and existing corporate officers and for investors.

Social implications

Social status is omnipresent and poorly understood as a mitigator or enabler of financial transactions, although there is some evidence that it is important.

Originality/value

This research bridges a gap that has heretofore only been very sparsely mapped, and provides suggested routes for further research.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

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Book part
Publication date: 3 June 2008

Steffen Andersen, Glenn W. Harrison, Morten I. Lau and E. Elisabet Rutström

We review the use of behavior from television game shows to infer risk attitudes. These shows provide evidence when contestants are making decisions over very large…

Abstract

We review the use of behavior from television game shows to infer risk attitudes. These shows provide evidence when contestants are making decisions over very large stakes, and in a replicated, structured way. Inferences are generally confounded by the subjective assessment of skill in some games, and the dynamic nature of the task in most games. We consider the game shows Card Sharks, Jeopardy!, Lingo, and finally Deal Or No Deal. We provide a detailed case study of the analyses of Deal Or No Deal, since it is suitable for inference about risk attitudes and has attracted considerable attention.

Details

Risk Aversion in Experiments
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-547-5

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Article
Publication date: 21 January 2020

Yanling Peng and Rong Kong

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the economic relationship with recent changes in China’s land use policy and rural development through innovation and entrepreneurship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the economic relationship with recent changes in China’s land use policy and rural development through innovation and entrepreneurship.

Design/methodology/approach

The first issue of economic importance is in understanding the market value of land use rights (LUR) transactions. To examine this, the authors build an argument around the idea of economic and marginal rents from Ricardo. The second issue relates to the extent by which deepening the rural financial landscape by allowing the mortgaging of LUR will promote and advance much needed entrepreneurial activity. To explore this issue, the authors draw on Schumpeter. The empirical contribution is based on a survey of 1,465 farm households in Gansu, Henan, Shaanxi and Shandong provinces.

Findings

In an endogenous Two-Stage Least Squares model, the authors find a positive and significant relationship between a willingness to mortgage LUR and entrepreneurship, which suggest that the new policy may well meet that objective. However, the authors do not find that entrepreneurs alone will have a willingness to mortgage LUR; non-entrepreneurs – traditional farmer types – would also be willing to mortgage LUR, but with a caveat that either group already has a disposition or demand for credit.

Originality/value

The value of the analysis is to provide an evidence to understand the market value of LUR transactions and to study the relationship between mortgage of LUR and entrepreneurial activity.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 80 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Book part
Publication date: 1 October 2008

Anders Frederiksen, Ebbe Krogh Graversen and Nina Smith

Labor supply data seldom include detailed information on hours and wages in secondary job or overtime work. Based on survey information on hours and wages in overtime work…

Abstract

Labor supply data seldom include detailed information on hours and wages in secondary job or overtime work. Based on survey information on hours and wages in overtime work and second job which is merged to administrative register information on income taxes and deductions we estimate a “Hausman labor supply model,” which allows for a detailed treatment of nonconvexities. Including explicit information on overtime pay and second job wages increase the estimated elasticities compared to a standard labor supply model without this information. However, allowing a more flexible treatment of nonconvexities the estimated elasticities are reduced; even below the estimates of the baseline results. In simulations we show that these findings have significant consequences when evaluating the degree of self-financing of various tax reforms.

Details

Work, Earnings and Other Aspects of the Employment Relation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-552-9

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2019

Akanksha Choudhary and Ashish Singh

A few studies in India have related daughters’ education to their fathers, but there is little to no evidence when it comes to the intergenerational relation between…

Abstract

Purpose

A few studies in India have related daughters’ education to their fathers, but there is little to no evidence when it comes to the intergenerational relation between daughters and mothers’ education. Using India Human Development Survey (IHDS) 2011–2012, the purpose of this paper is to investigate intergenerational educational mobility among women (15–49 years) (vis-à-vis their mothers) for all India.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses transition/mobility matrices and multiple mobility measures for the examination of intergenerational educational mobility among women (15–49 years) in India. The data have been taken from the “India Human Development Survey 2011-12.”

Findings

Findings indicate that intergenerational educational mobility at the all-India level is about 0.69, that is, 69 percent of the women acquire a level of education different from their mothers. Of the overall mobility, about 80 percent is contributed by upward mobility whereas the rest is downward. Mobility is greater in urban areas and is highest among the socially advantaged “Others” (or upper) caste group. Also, the upward component is substantially lower for socially disadvantaged groups compared to others. Further, there are large inter-regional variations, with the situation being worst in the central and eastern states such as Uttaranchal, Chhattisgarh, Bihar, Jharkhand, Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Manipur, Mizoram, Tripura, etc. Moreover, mobility (overall and upward) increases consistently as one moves up the income distribution.

Originality/value

This study is perhaps the first study which comprehensively studies intergenerational educational mobility for women (15–49 years) at an all-India level. Findings not only capture the mobility at the aggregate level but also for different caste groups as well as regional variations and income effect.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 2 August 2018

Panos Sousounis and Gauthier Lanot

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect employed friends have on the probability of exiting unemployment of an unemployed worker according to his/her…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect employed friends have on the probability of exiting unemployment of an unemployed worker according to his/her educational (skill) level.

Design/methodology/approach

In common with studies on unemployment duration, this paper uses a discrete-time hazard model.

Findings

The paper finds that the conditional probability of finding work is between 24 and 34 per cent higher per period for each additional employed friend for job seekers with intermediate skills.

Social implications

These results are of interest since they suggest that the reach of national employment agencies could extend beyond individuals in direct contact with first-line employment support bureaus.

Originality/value

Because of the lack of appropriate longitudinal information, the majority of empirical studies in the area assess the influence of social networks on employment status using proxy measures of social interactions. The current study contributes to the very limited empirical literature of the influence of social networks on job attainment using direct measures of social structures.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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