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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Simon Vicary, John G. Treble and John Baker

The skill mismatch between the pool of long‐termunemployed and job vacancies in the Hull travelto work area is focused on, with data providedby a survey, the Training…

Abstract

The skill mismatch between the pool of long‐term unemployed and job vacancies in the Hull travel to work area is focused on, with data provided by a survey, the Training Agency and the National On‐line Manpower Information Service (NOMIS). A brief account of the industrial and employment structure of Humberside is given, together with an overall view of unemployment trends in the area and the various trends in the demand for labour as revealed by official statistics.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1982

J.F. McMORROW

The categorization of different manifestations of teacher activist behaviour is the central focus of this paper. Evidence for the analysis is obtained from interviews with…

Abstract

The categorization of different manifestations of teacher activist behaviour is the central focus of this paper. Evidence for the analysis is obtained from interviews with teacher activists and from an extensive period of participant‐observation within an Australian teachers' organization. A matrix of nine categories of activism is described in which teacher unionists are classified according to the strength of their identification with the union (“Us”) or the union leadership's internal and external opponents (“Them”) during a period of intense political and industrial conflict. Some of the personal and attitudinal characteristics of the groups of activist teachers so described are discussed in general terms. The study presents a more complex picture of teacher activism than is implied by the more usual classifications of “left”, “right” and “moderate”. The conclusions drawn might also provide material for more extensive research, perhaps of an empirical nature, into teacher involvement in various forms of political and industrial activism.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2018

Hannah Vaughan-Lee, Lezlie Caro Moriniere, Isabelle Bremaud and Marilise Turnbull

Despite increased attention to, and investment in, scaling up of disaster risk reduction (DRR), there has been little detailed discussion of scalability. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite increased attention to, and investment in, scaling up of disaster risk reduction (DRR), there has been little detailed discussion of scalability. The purpose of this paper is to respond to this critical gap by proposing a definition of scaling up for DRR, what effective scaling up entails, and how to measure and plan for scalability.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of debates, case studies and good practices in DRR and parallel sectors (i.e. education, health and the wider development field) unveiled and enabled the weighting of key concepts that inform scalability. The mixed methods research then developed, validated and employed a scalability assessment framework to examine 20 DRR and five non-DRR initiatives for which a minimum set of evidence was accessible.

Findings

Support from national, regional and/or local authorities strongly influenced the scalability of all initiatives assessed. Currently, insufficient to support effective scaling up, monitoring and evaluation were also found to be critical to both identify potential for and measure scalability.

Originality/value

The paper ends with a scalability assessment and planning tool to measure and monitor the scalability potential of DRR initiatives, highlighting areas for corrective action that can improve the quality and effectiveness of DRR interventions.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 17 July 2007

Fumiyo Kagawa

An online questionnaire survey was conducted to explore University of Plymouth students' perceptions and understandings of, and attitudes towards, sustainable development…

Abstract

Purpose

An online questionnaire survey was conducted to explore University of Plymouth students' perceptions and understandings of, and attitudes towards, sustainable development and related concepts and issues. In general, student perceptions of sustainable development have been under‐researched. This research sought to go some way towards filling the gap by providing insights for those working in the field of education for sustainable development (ESD) in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was administrated in autumn 2005 by the Centre for Sustainable Futures at the University of Plymouth. The closed‐category statements were analyzed in terms of frequencies and percentages. A comprehensive set of cross tabulations and χ2 tests were also conducted using SPSS. Responses to open‐ended questions were coded and categorized according to emerging themes.

Findings

Key findings include, first, that a majority of student respondents think sustainability is “a good thing” their positive response not particularly correlating with their degree of familiarity with either of the concepts of sustainable development or sustainability. Second, students strongly associate the concepts of sustainable development and sustainability with their environmental as against economic and social aspects. Third, in terms of personal change for a sustainable lifestyle, “light green” actions addressing responsibility as consumers such as changing purchasing habits, recycling, and saving energy and/or water were most frequently articulated. Fourth, respondents harbour mixed feelings regarding the future of society in the face of sustainability‐oriented challenges.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the importance of ESD curriculum development that more explicitly addresses the interconnectedness of different aspects of sustainable development and which also employs pedagogies that help students to take action towards realizing their preferred futures. It also suggests future study directed towards identifying various means of facilitating students' pro‐sustainability behaviours.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1976

PETER DOSSOR

The Australian Capital Territory has shaken off the bonds of the New South Wales Department of Education and instituted an Authority responsible directly to the Federal…

Abstract

The Australian Capital Territory has shaken off the bonds of the New South Wales Department of Education and instituted an Authority responsible directly to the Federal Government. The new system includes in its design for “a working partnership for local‐central control” school boards. This paper attempts a comparison of that partnership with that evolved within the New Zealand experience. The A.C.T. Authority as it is presently constituted exercises control only over government primary and secondary schools. The discussion is therefore restricted to these fields and ignores preschool and technical education and independent schools, all of which are expected eventually to be brought within the scope of the Authority. Six issues are discussed in detail: (1) the general question of centralisation, (2) the role of a centralised agency, (3) the role of the community in an education system, (4) life‐long education, (5) the appointment of staff, and (6) the control of finance.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

G Selby and R Alexander

De‐institutionalisation and the closure of long‐stay hospitals brought about an increased focus on the development of alternative systems for the safe and effective…

Abstract

De‐institutionalisation and the closure of long‐stay hospitals brought about an increased focus on the development of alternative systems for the safe and effective treatment of people with mental health problems. One result of this focus was the introduction of the care programme approach or CPA (DoH, 1989; 1990a; 1990b). The main elements of the CPA are systematic arrangements for assessing the health and social needs of people accepted into mental health services, formulation of a care plan which identifies all health and social care needs, and appointment of a care co‐ordinator to keep in close touch with the patient and to monitor care, regular review, and, if necessary, agreed changes to the care plan.Though the CPA was originally seen as a mechanism to ensure proper aftercare for those discharged from hospitals, the Government later made it clear that it should be seen as a framework for the delivery of mental health care (DoH, 1998). All health authorities are now required to implement it for people with mental health needs referred to specialist psychiatric services.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Barbara Culiberg, Mateja Kos Koklic, Vesna Žabkar and Katarina K. Mihelič

This chapter captures the interrelatedness of sustainable production and consumption, which can be brought together in the concept of sustainable market exchange. The…

Abstract

This chapter captures the interrelatedness of sustainable production and consumption, which can be brought together in the concept of sustainable market exchange. The purpose of this chapter is to develop and present a framework of sustainable market exchange, including the key players, factors that influence sustainable behavior and issues that need to be addressed to achieve sustainable market exchange. The framework includes the ecological, economic, and social dimensions, while factors in the framework are classified into three groups: individual, relational, and societal. The sustainability spheres and stakeholders contribute to raising the importance of the phenomenon in the long run. The authors subsequently conduct an exploratory quantitative study to examine the features of the framework which is empirically examined from the perspective of one group of stakeholders that needs to be understood better, that is, consumers. Searching for answers to research questions on how consumers perceive their sustainable behavior, company sustainable behavior, how perceptions of production and consumption are related and what are the differences according to individual factors, the authors demonstrate different emphasis that consumers place on different sustainability dimensions and suggest recommendations for encouraging sustainable market exchange for management and public policy stakeholders.

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Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Ingrid Lynch, Tracy Morison, Catriona Ida Macleod, Magdalena Mijas, Ryan du Toit and Simi Seemanthini

Existing reviews of research on voluntary childlessness generally take the form of narrative summaries, focusing on main topics investigated over time. In this chapter…

Abstract

Existing reviews of research on voluntary childlessness generally take the form of narrative summaries, focusing on main topics investigated over time. In this chapter, the authors extend previous literature reviews to conduct a systematic review and content analysis of socio-historical and geopolitical aspects of knowledge production about voluntary childlessness. The dataset comprised 195 peer-reviewed articles that were coded and analysed to explore, inter alia: the main topic under investigation; country location of authors; sample characteristics; theoretical framework and methodology. The findings are discussed in relation to the socio-historical contexts of knowledge production, drawing on theoretical insights concerned with the politics of location, representation and research practice. The shifts in the topics of research from the 1970s, when substantial research first emerged, uphold the view of voluntary childlessness as non-normative. With some regional variation, knowledge is dominated by quantitative, hard science methodologies and mostly generated about privileged, married women living in the global North. The implications of this for future research concerned with reproductive freedom are outlined.

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Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Victoria A. Johnson, Kevin R. Ronan, David M. Johnston and Robin Peace

The purpose of this paper is to assess the national implementation of disaster preparedness education in New Zealand primary schools through the dissemination of What's

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the national implementation of disaster preparedness education in New Zealand primary schools through the dissemination of What's the Plan, Stan?, a voluntary, curriculum-based teaching resource.

Design/methodology/approach

Results and findings from a focus group study with school teachers and local civil defence staff in 2011 and a nationally representative survey of schools in 2012 were analyzed to identify intervening, facilitating and deterrent factors of uptake and use of the resource.

Findings

The main intervening factors between resource promotion and school teachers’ awareness of the resource are word of mouth among school teachers and teachers’ proactive lesson plan research. The strongest facilitating factor was school-wide use of the resource. Lack of awareness of the resource and the perceived need for teacher training are the greatest deterrents to use of the resource.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, several recommendations are provided for increasing use of the resource including use of web-based technology for teacher training, integration of disaster preparedness messaging into other children's programs, ongoing evaluation and curriculum requirements.

Originality/value

An evaluation of the implementation of What's the Plan, Stan? adds to the limited body of knowledge on the benefits and challenges to distributing a voluntary teaching resource as a national strategy for curriculum integration of disaster education. The findings and lessons are relevant for nations meeting the Core Indicators of progress toward the 2005-2015 Hyogo Framework For Action.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2011

Regi Alexander, Avinash Hiremath, Verity Chester, Fatima Green, Ignatius Gunaratna and Sudeep Hoare

The aim of the project was to evaluate the short‐term treatment outcomes of patients treated in a medium secure service for people with intellectual disability. A total of…

Abstract

The aim of the project was to evaluate the short‐term treatment outcomes of patients treated in a medium secure service for people with intellectual disability. A total of 138 patients, 77 discharged and 61 current inpatients, treated over a six‐year period were included in the audit. Information on demographic and clinical variables was collected on a pre‐designed data collection tool and analysed using appropriate statistical methods. The median length of stay for the discharged group was 2.8 years. About 90% of this group were discharged to lower levels of security and about a third went directly to community placements. None of the clinical and forensic factors examined was significantly associated with length of stay for this group. There was a ‘difficult to discharge long‐stay’ group which had more patients with criminal sections, restriction orders, history of abuse, fire setting, personality disorders and substance misuse. However, when regression analysis was done, most of these factors were not predictive of the length of stay. Clinical diagnosis or offending behaviour categories are poor predictors of length of hospital stay, and there is a need to identify empirically derived patient clusters using a variety of clinical and forensic variables. Common datasets and multi‐centre audits are needed to drive this.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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