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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

This paper analyses a survey conducted by futurethink. This survey addresses the issue of effective innovation.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper analyses a survey conducted by futurethink. This survey addresses the issue of effective innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey by futurethink provides the basis for this article.

Findings

Having studied successful innovators across a variety of sectors and organizational structures, futurethink has developed a framework that breaks down the “black box” of innovation into four key capabilities that organizations need to effectively innovate: ideas; strategy; process; and climate.

Originality/value

The analysis also found clues on how organizations may better innovate by looking at how they're currently structured.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 23 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Lisa Bodell

If we want people to approach change differently, we have to change our approach. Showing people how you want them to behave when it comes to innovation is infinitely more…

311

Abstract

Purpose

If we want people to approach change differently, we have to change our approach. Showing people how you want them to behave when it comes to innovation is infinitely more powerful than telling them – or worse yet, mandating it. Instead of top-down initiatives that generate eye-rolling or fear of increased work, it is the small things – the Little BIGS – that can truly ignite desired innovation behaviors and ensure powerful and lasting behavior change. The purpose of this paper is to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

“The devil is in the details,” as the old saying goes. But what does this mean? It is the little things that matter. This is a concept that I think is true even when it comes to innovation, but not in the way that you probably think. Even small things, which the author calls, “Little BIGS®” can make a big difference and lead to a powerful culture change.

Findings

Little BIGS can be as simple as changing a policy, approach, contract, or a meeting. Even more appealing, it is something you can control because it all starts with you.

Originality/value

In the book, Kill the Company, the author translates this idea that “small things make a big difference” into a powerful culture change concept called, “Little BIGS®”.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Edie Weiner and Arnold Brown

To show how managing the right‐of‐way asset, a lesson the railroads didn't learn when they gave or bartered it away in the nineteenth century, will be a key to business

2057

Abstract

Purpose

To show how managing the right‐of‐way asset, a lesson the railroads didn't learn when they gave or bartered it away in the nineteenth century, will be a key to business success in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Businesses large and small, dot.com and brick and mortar, spend years establishing a network of customers, suppliers, creditors, investors, employees, and stakeholders that is, in effect, a right‐of‐way. Unfortunately, few have understood how to capitalize on their right‐of‐way, thus leveraging one of the most currently underutilized assets in the economy.

Findings

Learn to imagine the effect of disruptive innovation on an established right‐of‐way and how to discern what capabilities will be needed to take advantage of such potential opportunities. Having invested in building a business or a professional practice or an organization or a network, you have developed associated strategic assets that you need to leverage adequately to provide additional returns.

Research limitations/implications

This conceptual paper provides historical research only.

Practical implications

Focusing on right‐of‐way enables companies to see and benefit from the potential customer instead of just the “best” customers. This amounts to a key recognition – that managing access to the customers equals managing the right‐of‐way, one of the most valuable assets a business can have in a time of growing competition.

Originality/value

To understand its true value and possibilities you must first escape the mental trap of limiting your asset management to just the business you think you're in. Then a strategy based on creative leveraging is not only possible, it is desirable.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 January 2009

144

Abstract

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

719

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

A strong argument could be made for innovation being the most important means by which manufacturers can create competitive advantage. In the short‐term, struggling firms might have to concern themselves with any number of immediate issues, from lay‐offs and cost reduction to greater operational efficiency. But in the long run, the case for innovation becomes well nigh indisputable.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 January 2007

Arnold Brown

Increasingly over the next decade corporate leaders will have to deal with the political and social fallout of othersourcing – the ability to have work done by robots and

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Abstract

Purpose

Increasingly over the next decade corporate leaders will have to deal with the political and social fallout of othersourcing – the ability to have work done by robots and computer programs.

Design/methodology/approach

Provides examples of this othersourcing trend in every kind of business, and also in government, military, and non‐profit activities as well.

Findings

People will increasingly be on their own, in competition with software, robots, foreigners, newly engineered systems, unexpected competition, do‐it‐yourself customers and other independent contactors.

Practical implications

Employers should have a comprehensive othersourcing strategy that includes dealing with an increase in negative consequences.

Originality/value

Establishes othersourcing – a potentially massive shift of increasingly higher kinds of work to machines and software –as an even more disruptive trend than outsourcing.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

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