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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Sue Brooks

Outlines the barriers to efficient, strategic and future-proofed succession plans, centered on a case study example of Telefónica.

Abstract

Purpose

Outlines the barriers to efficient, strategic and future-proofed succession plans, centered on a case study example of Telefónica.

Design/methodology/approach

Draws on information provided by the company's UK and Europe talent manager.

Findings

Describes the journey taken by Telefónica to build a succession plan that is both relevant now and adaptable to future demands, including key advice for HR specialist and resourcing teams.

Practical implications

Shows that current succession plans are not working as effectively as they might. A fresh approach to the process can lead to HR developing a plan that is future proof, addresses the emerging talent market and is a true reflection of the current workforce.

Social implications

Emphasizes the importance of effective talent management in a constantly evolving business world.

Originality/value

Provides a useful case-study example of successful talent management and the main issues that a future-proof plan ought to consider.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Maria‐Christina Georgiadou and Theophilus Hacking

The purpose of this paper is to investigate “best practice” building strategies and sustainability‐oriented techniques and tools used to assess the energy performance of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate “best practice” building strategies and sustainability‐oriented techniques and tools used to assess the energy performance of housing developments. The objective is to propose guidelines that can integrate futures thinking into the selection of energy‐related design responses, such as materials, building components and energy systems, from the early project stages.

Design/methodology/approach

An interdisciplinary approach is adopted with the inclusion of social, economic and environmental aspects of the energy supply and demand. A multiple case study approach is employed, which focuses on the residential sector of European mixed‐use developments that represent sustainable communities of “best practice”.

Findings

The investigation of “best practice” housing developments reveals that the majority of design responses cover mainstream environmental design strategies. Energy efficiency measures are still the “low hanging fruit” towards meeting the sustainability objectives. In addition, established sustainability‐oriented techniques and tools used focus mostly on projections of almost certain facts rather than explorations of a portfolio of plausible futures.

Originality/value

The paper represents a shift away from the short‐term mindset that still dominates design and construction practices. It provides an overview of building strategies and decision‐support techniques and tools for improving and incentivising sustainable energy solutions over the long term.

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Cassandra Findlay

Records and archives professionals around the globe have been grappling for some time with the challenge of preserving technology‐dependent records. A variety of…

Abstract

Records and archives professionals around the globe have been grappling for some time with the challenge of preserving technology‐dependent records. A variety of approaches and solutions have been developed, many of which are working effectively now. The State Records Authority of New South Wales (State Records) has developed a range of strategies, rules and tools on this issue for its own jurisdiction – Government organisations in the State of New South Wales, Australia. The latest product developed by State Records is a set of online guidelines titled, “Future proof: ensuring the accessibility of equipment/technology dependent records”. In this article, the background to the development of the guidelines is discussed, and the strategies they contain are described. Some considerations for the management of technology‐dependent State archives are also outlined.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2017

David Shemmings

How might the profession of child protection social work be “future proofed”, i.e. remain intact and of value beyond its present existence? The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Abstract

Purpose

How might the profession of child protection social work be “future proofed”, i.e. remain intact and of value beyond its present existence? The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a discussion/“think piece” paper, in which the author argues that foregrounding the art and science of helping relationships is a way forward. Recognising and promoting the centrality of helping relationships is the direction in which the author believes (or is it hopes?) social work should head, because “more of the same” is not, in the author’s view, possible to sustain for much longer. Treading the well-worn but pot-holed path of box-ticking, endless risk assessment and perfunctory statutory visiting is likely to lead to continuing problems retaining social workers and, for those who do stay, increased burnout, compassion fatigue and secondary trauma, each of which interrupts or delays the development of working alliances with family members.

Findings

Growing reliance on thresholds and checklists to assess risk has served to increase referrals. As a result, social workers spend much of their time on triaging and filtering rather than working with the children and families that most need help and protection. Further, it is not what is in the practitioner’s toolkit that matters: rather, it is a defined set of personal skills and qualities that tips the balance to achieve lasting change. Thus, in order to “future proof” social work, we would do well to deepen our understanding of how helping relationships can lead to lasting change. Supporting social workers in this work is not just the responsibility of individual practitioners and their professional bodies, action also needs to be taken at governmental and managerial levels.

Originality/value

This is a discussion/“think piece”.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 2-3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Dynamic Future-proofing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-526-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Richard Sayers

The Queensland Government Libraries Consortium can claim to be one of Australia's more successful special library consortia in recent years, with a stable core membership…

Abstract

The Queensland Government Libraries Consortium can claim to be one of Australia's more successful special library consortia in recent years, with a stable core membership of 14 library services, and combined savings to the Queensland Government of over A$1M in the 2002‐2003 financial year. This paper identifies critical success factors for the consortium to date, and looks to present and future challenges at a time when no organisation can afford to take continued existence, let alone success, for granted. In 2002, consortium members began looking strategically at how their organisation should be working to future‐proof services, and expertise. This process of internal review is still very much a work in progress, and continues to pose as many questions as it answers. It has, however, focused the attention on four issues of critical concern to the consortium: corporate governance, size, scope of functions, and recognition. Solutions implemented to date may serve as useful case studies for other consortia.

Details

Library Management, vol. 25 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Julie Fowlie and Clare Forder

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study centred on steps taken at a Business School in a UK university, to improve local work placement provision, respond to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study centred on steps taken at a Business School in a UK university, to improve local work placement provision, respond to student demand and engage more productively with local businesses. It is situated against renewed focus on universities’ engagement with local economies and the graduate labour market context as demonstrated by the government’s Industrial Strategy (BEIS, 2017) and the OfS (2018) business plan. It aims to emphasise how moving the focus back from graduates to placement students could offer a useful collaborative opportunity for local businesses to articulate what they want from future employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a mixed methods approach, drawing upon a case study on a new intervention piloted in the Business School as well as qualitative research gathered from questionnaires and interviews with students. Responses to questionnaires and interviews were analysed thematically in the Grounded Theory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) tradition.

Findings

The paper highlights the lack of literature on local placements and also demonstrates findings which echo existing research on typical barriers and drivers to placements in general. It offers original outcomes such as how for some students local placements offer a convenience value but for others they are part of committing to living and working locally after graduation.

Research limitations/implications

The small-scale nature of the study means that only indicative findings are presented. Further research is necessary for a more detailed examination of its implications.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made for a systematic approach to developing, or establishing for the first time, university–employer relationships in order to future-proof local placement opportunities.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the literature on local placements and also provides a fresh approach to how universities and employers might work together to identify local skills gaps and increase the provision of local placements. It also offers ways in students’ often negatively framed reasons for not undertaking a placement can be mitigated through engaging with the local context.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Lucia Tomassini, Leanne Schreurs and Elena Cavagnaro

The rapid growth of tourism prior to the COVID-19 pandemic prompts the need for critical reflection of tourism’s “local-global” responsibility in the wake of that…

Abstract

Purpose

The rapid growth of tourism prior to the COVID-19 pandemic prompts the need for critical reflection of tourism’s “local-global” responsibility in the wake of that pandemic. Conceptually driven by the ancient Greek notion of hubris, this study reflects on the perception of tourists as actors disconnected from citizens’ necessities, safety and well-being. In so doing we develop further knowledge on the relationship between the spaces of tourism and citizenship and how this might build a sustainable future-proof tourism.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected daily for two weeks via three Google Alert queries set to mine Italian online news media contents immediately after the Italian Government’s adoption of mobility restrictions due to COVID-19. This study uses a thematic narrative analysis to examine the contents related to tourists during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Findings

The exploratory findings reveal how tourists are largely presented as taking over the space of local residents and, by breaking the rules set by national and local authorities, as disregarding those residents’ safety and well-being. Hence, they appear disconnected from any sense of belonging to a local or global community, and from a space to which they owe a duty of care.

Originality/value

By framing tourists as hubristic subjects ontologically belonging to a neoliberal leisure space disentangled from the citizenship space, this study establishes a novel theoretical grounding from which a sustainable future-proof tourism that is rooted in citizenship space can be rethought.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 March 2012

Abstract

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 January 2012

Abstract

Details

Anti-Corrosion Methods and Materials, vol. 59 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0003-5599

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