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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Anja Kreidler and Meike Tilebein

Literature is unanimous about the effects of functional diversity in new product development teams. This paper uses simulation modeling to investigate the contradictory…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature is unanimous about the effects of functional diversity in new product development teams. This paper uses simulation modeling to investigate the contradictory and dynamic effects of functional team diversity on innovation revealed by empirical literature. This paper aims to start a discussion on this dynamic perspective of team diversity.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a systemic approach toward investigating the contradictory and dynamic effects of functional team diversity on innovation by creating a simplified System Dynamics model of functional diversity in new product development teams.

Findings

Although the simulation model is highly simplified, it can integrate the contradictory results of empirical data and the dynamic component of teamwork. Therefore, it offers a new approach to investigating the effects of functional diversity on team innovation.

Research limitations/implications

The model is highly simplified and exemplary. No actual data are included, thus limiting the results as fully theoretical.

Originality/value

Empirical studies often analyze the effects of functional diversity on innovation in new product development teams. However, empirical data are unclear regarding the nature of the effects of functional diversity on innovation. Therefore, functional diversity is chosen for the simulation model as being the most controversially discussed diversity attribute. By applying a simulation model to the problem and adding a dynamic component to teamwork, we are contributing to the explanation for the contradictory findings in literature.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Josette M. P. Gevers, Boudewijn A. Driedonks, Mariann Jelinek and Arjan J. van Weele

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how perceptions of team performance and teamwork processes relate to functional diversity appropriateness perceptions (FDAP)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how perceptions of team performance and teamwork processes relate to functional diversity appropriateness perceptions (FDAP), that is, whether one believes that the right functions are represented in a team. Thereby, the authors distinguish between perceptions of team managers and team members.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a cross-sectional survey study among 48 sourcing teams from 12 multinational companies, all from different industries.

Findings

Members’ and managers’ congruent perceptions of performance showed differential relationships with their perceptions of the team’s functional diversity appropriateness. For managers, perceptions of team performance and functional diversity appropriateness were directly and positively related. For team members, this relationship was moderated by teamwork behavior. Moreover, unlike team members, purchasing managers did not consider functionally diverse teams to be more suitable for executing sourcing tasks.

Research limitations/implications

This study identified teamwork behavior as a critical element for explaining the differences in FDAP of members and managers of sourcing teams.

Practical implications

Rather than homogenizing team structures, managers should stimulate good teamwork behavior that allows for an the integration of interests and insights from different functional areas.

Originality/value

This study adds to functional diversity literature as well as perceptual distance literature by revealing how different team effectiveness criteria shape managers’ and members’ perceptions of functional diversity appropriateness.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Sheila Simsarian Webber

Cross‐functional teams (CFTs) have increased in use within a variety of organizations. While these teams claim to enhance organizational effectiveness, research has seen…

15650

Abstract

Cross‐functional teams (CFTs) have increased in use within a variety of organizations. While these teams claim to enhance organizational effectiveness, research has seen mixed results. This paper examines the challenges faced by CFTs and why these challenges facilitate the need for the development of a team climate for trust. Trust is discussed as a team‐level construct, an aspect of the “micro‐climate” that occurs within a team. Leadership actions particularly important to cross‐functional teams and the development of trust are offered as influential in creating a team climate for trust in cross‐functional teams.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 August 2008

Chi-Ying Cheng, Jeffrey Sanchez-Burks and Fiona Lee

In this chapter, we posit that identity integration, an individual difference variable measuring the degree to which multiple and disparate social identities are perceived…

Abstract

In this chapter, we posit that identity integration, an individual difference variable measuring the degree to which multiple and disparate social identities are perceived as compatible, moderates the relationship between team diversity and innovation. Prior research shows that individuals with higher levels of identity integration exhibit higher levels of innovation on tasks that draw from identity-related knowledge systems. In this chapter, we extend this research to examine how innovation can be increased in cross-functional teams. We propose that reinforcing the compatibility between functional identities within a team facilitates access to functionally unique knowledge systems, which in turn increases team innovation.

Details

Diversity and Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-053-7

Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Gladys Esinu Abiew, Eugene Okyere-Kwakye and Florence Yaa Akyia Ellis

Underpinned by the information processing theory, this study aims to investigate the relationship between functional diversity and team innovation by examining the…

Abstract

Purpose

Underpinned by the information processing theory, this study aims to investigate the relationship between functional diversity and team innovation by examining the moderating role of some selected cultural dimensions (power distance, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity-femininity) in the relationship between functional diversity and innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research method was used using a structured questionnaire as a tool to collect data from 251 respondents drawn from research institutions in Ghana. Data was analysed using simple regression and hierarchical multiple regression. In addition, a structural equation model was used to conduct confirmatory factor analyses to examine whether the variables in the hypothesized model for the study captured distinct constructs that the variables were designed to measure.

Findings

The study revealed that functional diversity was positively related to team innovation. The study also found that functionally diverse groups are more innovative when they exhibit low uncertainty avoidance, femininity and low power distance.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that practices such as team communication, honesty, respect and trust would foster team unity and commitment, which would enable members to share diverse expertise towards the creation and execution of new ideas and improvement of productivity in the country.

Originality/value

The study examined the relationship between functional diversity and team innovation by examining the moderating role of some selected cultural dimensions (power distance, uncertainty avoidance and masculinity-femininity) in the relationship between functional diversity and innovation.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2018

Ci-Rong Li, Chun-Xuan Li, Chen-Ju Lin and Jing Liu

The purpose of this paper is to explicate the influence of diverse team on team-level ambidexterity and its curvilinear assessment, and test the mediating role of team

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explicate the influence of diverse team on team-level ambidexterity and its curvilinear assessment, and test the mediating role of team reflexivity and the moderating role of shared meta-knowledge in the curvilinear relationship between team diversity and team ambidexterity.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected multisource and temporally separated data on 206 R&D teams within 28 high-tech firms in Taiwan.

Findings

This study found a complex, curvilinear, moderated mediation relationship that functional background diversity has with team ambidexterity. Furthermore, consistent with the notion from categorization-elaboration model, the authors found the curvilinear relationship that functional background diversity has with both team ambidexterity and team reflexivity. Finally, the authors also found that the curvilinear relationship between functional background diversity and team reflexivity was moderated by shared meta-knowledge, such that the positive relationship was strengthened and the negative relationship weakened, in higher shared meta-knowledge in teams rather than lower.

Originality/value

The results demonstrate that team diversity-team ambidexterity relationship is much more complicated than previous works have assumed or suggested. Overall, the authors contribute to a novel understanding about the importance of team diversity in ambidextrous teams by opening the black box of how and when functional background diversity and team ambidexterity.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 56 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 July 2016

Pascale Benoliel and Anit Somech

There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although…

Abstract

Purpose

There has been an increasing trend toward the creation of senior management teams (SMTs) which are characterized by a high degree of functional heterogeneity. Although such teams may create better linkages to information, along with the benefits of functional heterogeneity comes the potential for conflicts that stem from the value differences among subcultures in an organization. These conflicts can adversely affect performance. The purpose of this paper is to examine how school leaders’ activities mediate the relationship of SMT functional heterogeneity to SMT effectiveness (in-role performance and innovation).

Design/methodology/approach

Data, which were obtained through a survey, was collected from a sample of 92 schools in Israel. Data were collected from two sources (principals and SMT members) to minimize problems associated with same source and common method bias. Data were aggregated at the team level of analysis.

Findings

The results of structural equation model indicated that principal’s internal activities enhanced SMT in-role performance whereas principals’ external activities enhanced SMT innovation. The results also showed that principal’s internal activities are full mediators of the relationship between functional heterogeneity and SMT in-role performance.

Originality/value

This study has implications for policies involving the design and implementation of leadership tools to effectively manage SMTs. The results of this study can help principals to establish priorities and allocate their time and resources more effectively, both inward and outward the SMT boundary so as to assist functionally heterogeneous SMTs translating the benefits of functional heterogeneity into significant achievements.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 54 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Todd A. Boyle, Vinod Kumar and Uma Kumar

This article is the first in a two‐part discussion of the determinants and performance consequences of concurrent engineering (CE) team usage in organizations. The purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

This article is the first in a two‐part discussion of the determinants and performance consequences of concurrent engineering (CE) team usage in organizations. The purpose of this first article is to develop a model of the organizational factors that influence the extent that CE teams are used when developing new products.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the model, 2,500 questionnaires were mailed to new product development (NPD) managers from the machinery, computer product, electrical equipment, and transportation equipment manufacturing industries, of which 189 usable questionnaires were returned, for a usable response rate of 7.5 percent. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling with partial least squares.

Findings

Results indicate that an innovative organizational climate and complex NPD activities both influence the extent that organizations support functional integration on NPD teams, and this support, in turn, influences the extent that organizations use CE teams. Analyzing the qualitative data using content analysis indicates additional factors influencing CE team usage.

Research limitations/implications

To researchers, this study examines in detail the extent of CE team usage, thus addressing a major gap in the research literature. This study also addresses the concerns of researchers by examining organizational contextual factors.

Practical implications

To NPD managers, this study highlights organizational precursor conditions needed in order for CE teams to be supported in the organizations, specifically complex NPD activities and an innovative organizational climate. By examining these two variables, NPD managers can gauge the likelihood that CE teams will be supported even before they are actually implemented.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Ricardo Santa, Mario Ferrer, Phil Bretherton and Paul Hyland

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of cross‐functional teams in the alignment between system effectiveness and operational effectiveness after the…

3721

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of cross‐functional teams in the alignment between system effectiveness and operational effectiveness after the implementation of enterprise information systems (EIS). In addition, it aims to explore the contribution of cross‐functional teams to improvement in operational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses a combination of qualitative and quantitative methods, in a two‐stage methodological approach, to investigate the influence of cross‐functional teams on the alignment between system effectiveness and operational effectiveness and the impact of the stated alignment on the improvement in operational performance.

Findings

Initial findings suggest that factors stemming from system effectiveness and the performance objectives stemming from operational effectiveness are important and significantly well correlated factors that promote the alignment between the effectiveness of technological implementation and the effectiveness of operations. In addition, confirmatory factor analysis has been used to find the structural relationships and provide explanations for the stated alignment and the contribution of cross‐functional teams to the improvement in operational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The principal limitation of this study is its small sample size.

Practical implications

Cross‐functional teams have been used by many organisations as a way of involving expertise from different functional areas in the implementation of innovative technologies. An appropriate use of the dimensions that emerged from this research, in the context of cross‐functional teams, will assist organisations to properly utilise cross‐functional teams with the aim of improving operational performance.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new approach to measure the effectiveness of EIS implementation by adding new dimensions to measure it.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Todd A. Boyle, Uma Kumar and Vinod Kumar

Purpose – This research aims to identify various organizational‐level factors influencing support for cross‐functional new product development (NPD) teams.

3457

Abstract

Purpose – This research aims to identify various organizational‐level factors influencing support for cross‐functional new product development (NPD) teams. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 2,500 questionnaires where mailed in 2003 to managers of product development from Canadian and US manufacturing organizations operating in the machinery, computer, electronic product, electrical equipment, and transportation equipment manufacturing industrial sectors. A total of 269 usable questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 11.1 percent. Findings – Results of performing regression analysis indicate that the quality of communication between the functional disciplines involved in NPD activities, perceived risks and complexity of using cross‐functional NPD teams, and the complexity of the organization's NPD activities all influence organizational support for cross‐functional NPD teams. Based on the qualitative data, additional reasons why cross‐functional NPD teams may not be supported in organizations are identified and discussed. Research limitations/implications – The major limitation of this study is that the respondents are NPD managers. These managers commented on the extent that support for cross‐functional NPD teams exists at the team, departmental, and senior management levels. Future research should focus on gauging organizational support for cross‐functional NPD teams by directly surveying team members, functional managers, and senior managers. Practical implications – This study identifies various organizational‐level factors influencing support for cross‐functional NPD teams. Originality/value – This research is of value to managers using or implementing cross‐functional teams, as it indicates potential organizational‐level factors that may facilitate or hamper the usage of such teams. To researchers, it provides a starting point in studying the determinants of support for cross‐functional NPD teams, and cross‐functional teams in general.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 37000