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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

Kai Foerstl, Evi Hartmann, Finn Wynstra and Roger Moser

The purpose of this paper is to develop a set of nine hypotheses linking four purchasing and supply management (PSM) practices directly to purchasing performance and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a set of nine hypotheses linking four purchasing and supply management (PSM) practices directly to purchasing performance and indirectly to financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data in a global cross‐industry survey of 148 companies, combining primary interview and survey data with secondary data on firm performance, in order to minimize the impact of common method variance.

Findings

Support was found for eight of the nine hypotheses. In particular, a positive impact was found of cross‐functional integration and functional coordination on purchasing performance, and of purchasing performance on firm performance. Both talent management and performance management have a positive impact on cross‐functional integration and functional coordination. Talent management also has a direct impact on purchasing performance, in contrast to performance management.

Originality/value

The association of enhanced PSM maturity levels with financial performance metrics collected from secondary data sources provides robust empirical support for the stated but to this point largely untested positive impact of PSMmaturity on the firm's competitive position.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2012

Lucia Aparecida da Silva, Ieda Pelogia Martins Damian and Silvia Inês Dallavalle de Pádua

Migration from the traditional management model to the BPM (business process management) approach results in improved process performance. In order to promote BPM, it is…

Abstract

Purpose

Migration from the traditional management model to the BPM (business process management) approach results in improved process performance. In order to promote BPM, it is necessary to have an organizational approach that defines the necessary tasks of the processes' project, day‐to‐day execution, and learning‐related tasks. In this aspect, there are difficulties and barriers to be confronted in a different way through organization. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the importance attributed to the tasks necessary for process management considering the way the management of these tasks and barriers found in order to change from functional management to process oriented management.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study was developed on two companies from the services sector. In‐depth interviews with managers from the companies studied were conducted.

Findings

It was identified that these companies found themselves at different levels of transition from the functional management process to process oriented management and that people and organizational cultures are presented in both organizations as the main barriers to changes within this management model.

Research limitations/implications

This research is based on a broad bibliographical base in opposition to the limited capacity of empirical validation.

Originality/value

The paper describes an empirical case study which refers to BPM tasks and to the barriers that will be transposed in order to promote business process management. The research investigates which BPM tasks are executed and the importance of each task and even the barriers against changing the management.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Abstract

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Rafael Paim, Heitor Mansur Caulliraux and Rodolfo Cardoso

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to defining the tasks necessary to process management, considering both conceptual and practical views.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to defining the tasks necessary to process management, considering both conceptual and practical views.

Design/methodology/approach

Bibliographic review for tasks mentioned as typically necessary to process management, plus a field survey involving professionals working in process management.

Findings

The bibliographic review yielded a set of tasks that were grouped conceptually into “designing processes”, “managing processes from day to day” and “fostering process‐related learning”. These groups were then validated with practioners as valid constructs. The field survey produced two major findings: the first underlining the practical importance of the tasks identified as necessary to process management and the second demonstrating that most organizations where the study participants work are structured functionally, but have practices for managing cross‐functional processes or “end‐to‐end process”. The conceptual and practical comparison brings to light gaps between authors and professionals.

Research limitations/implications

There is significant variation in the job positions and sectors occupied by the group studied and the sample is not random, given that all are enrolled in postgraduate process management programs and thus share an interest in the subject.

Practical implications

Organizations can identify tasks that are necessary and important to process management and have an instrument (the questionnaire) for deciding how best to manage processes. Where functional management of cross‐functional processes is found, this recommends developing organizational solutions to upgrade the capacity for coordination among activities without necessarily introducing changes in organizational structure.

Originality/value

The paper describes an unprecedented study and helps clarify what needs to be done to manage processes.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 14 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2018

Wein-Hong Chen, Min-Ping Kang and Bella Butler

Penrose’s argument regarding the managerial constraint on continual expansion over two consecutive periods is termed the “Penrose effect,” a relatively less investigated…

Abstract

Purpose

Penrose’s argument regarding the managerial constraint on continual expansion over two consecutive periods is termed the “Penrose effect,” a relatively less investigated premise in Penrose’s growth theory. The purpose of this paper is to empirically re-examine the Penrose effect from the perspective of upper echelons theory and investigated how top management team (TMT) composition influences the continual growth of a firm.

Design/methodology/approach

This study empirically tested the hypotheses based on a sample of listed manufacturing firms operating in Taiwan, a newly industrialized economy in the Asia–Pacific region. Moderated hierarchical regression analyses were applied to test hypotheses.

Findings

The empirical results suggest that low TMT diversity (in terms of educational, functional and team tenure diversity) is likely to engender a situation in which the Penrose effect might occur. Additionally, the results indicate that the proportion of functional executives plays a significant role in influencing the growth trend over two consecutive periods and may soften the impact of the Penrose effect.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that appropriate structuring of TMTs and appropriate management of their members’ backgrounds and team tenure diversity can help firms overcome the Penrose effect and grow continually. Furthermore, the proportion of functional executives in a TMT is influential.

Originality/value

This paper uniquely contributes to the theoretical and empirical development of Penrose’s growth theory, upper echelons theory and resource-based view concerning managerial resources.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2020

Ngoako Solomon Marutha

The paper sought to investigate the landscaping of electronic system through the use of the functional patient’s records management activities. The rationale is to share…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper sought to investigate the landscaping of electronic system through the use of the functional patient’s records management activities. The rationale is to share views and guide organisations that are struggling with providing specification for a functional records management system.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used qualitative approach to apply the literature in supporting the views about landscaping electronic system using functional patient’s records management activities.

Findings

The study revealed that without consideration of records management activities the likelihood is that the system may be not properly functional. The best way to landscape electronic system for records management is using records management activities. This will assist in avoiding critical omission for inclusion of all records management system operational activities.

Originality/value

The paper is proposing a new way of landscaping the electronic system by using the records management functional activities. It also provides a framework to guide the implementers or electronic system developers. The paper was partially extracted from the author’s Ph.D. thesis completed in 2016, to develop a framework for landscaping the electronic system by using the records management functional activities.

Details

Collection and Curation, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9326

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Todd A. Boyle, Uma Kumar and Vinod Kumar

Purpose – This research aims to identify various organizational‐level factors influencing support for cross‐functional new product development (NPD) teams.

Abstract

Purpose – This research aims to identify various organizational‐level factors influencing support for cross‐functional new product development (NPD) teams. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 2,500 questionnaires where mailed in 2003 to managers of product development from Canadian and US manufacturing organizations operating in the machinery, computer, electronic product, electrical equipment, and transportation equipment manufacturing industrial sectors. A total of 269 usable questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 11.1 percent. Findings – Results of performing regression analysis indicate that the quality of communication between the functional disciplines involved in NPD activities, perceived risks and complexity of using cross‐functional NPD teams, and the complexity of the organization's NPD activities all influence organizational support for cross‐functional NPD teams. Based on the qualitative data, additional reasons why cross‐functional NPD teams may not be supported in organizations are identified and discussed. Research limitations/implications – The major limitation of this study is that the respondents are NPD managers. These managers commented on the extent that support for cross‐functional NPD teams exists at the team, departmental, and senior management levels. Future research should focus on gauging organizational support for cross‐functional NPD teams by directly surveying team members, functional managers, and senior managers. Practical implications – This study identifies various organizational‐level factors influencing support for cross‐functional NPD teams. Originality/value – This research is of value to managers using or implementing cross‐functional teams, as it indicates potential organizational‐level factors that may facilitate or hamper the usage of such teams. To researchers, it provides a starting point in studying the determinants of support for cross‐functional NPD teams, and cross‐functional teams in general.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Shirley C. Anderson

This paper examines four underlying trends in the changing business environment relating to information technology and geographic, functional and sectorial integration. It…

Abstract

This paper examines four underlying trends in the changing business environment relating to information technology and geographic, functional and sectorial integration. It discusses three required changes in management focus needed to reach global profitability from product inception to promotion. The skills required for this change are listed by functional area, although the techniques are predominantly cross‐cultural. This paper explains the steps needed to move from a traditional firm to a globally competitive network and the cultural barriers to building consumer‐focused extended‐value chains. Finally it discusses ways in which business school education can promote strategic thinking about profitability and heighten awareness of the potential gains from cooperative inter‐firm partnerships.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Klara Palmberg

Process management is becoming an essential part of contemporary organizations in all industries. However, many organizations experience problems during the implementation…

Abstract

Purpose

Process management is becoming an essential part of contemporary organizations in all industries. However, many organizations experience problems during the implementation of a process management approach. The purpose of this paper is to explore and describe the organizational implications when implementing process management, how to handle the relationship between the functional organization and a process perspective, and the roles of managers, teams, and individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

A multiple‐case study approach is used to get an extensive picture of and analyze how three Swedish organizations have worked with process management.

Findings

The studied organizations have introduced a process management structure into their functional organizational structure, including the introduction of new management positions such as process owners and process leaders. A discourse is identified in earlier research between those arguing for a full transformation from a functionally oriented to a fully process‐oriented organizational structure, and those promoting a more moderate transformation where a process management structure is “matrixed onto” the existing organization. The analysis could be interpreted as supporting the second line of reasoning, where the functional and process structures co‐exist in the organization, creating a constructive dynamic.

Originality/value

The paper provides two major contributions. First, the empirical descriptions and analysis of implementing process management contribute to the knowledge and understanding among both practitioners and researchers. The second major contribution is the identified need of co‐existence of a process and functional perspective, and the implication that complexity is created rather than reduced in organizations.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2007

Jeff Morelli

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems of using metadata to file electronic documents as well as the problems of using a purely functional filing scheme…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to highlight the problems of using metadata to file electronic documents as well as the problems of using a purely functional filing scheme. It aims to explore how a functional file plan can be created from a business classification scheme by inserting “metadata signpost folders” at strategic points in the filing hierarchy to create a “hybrid functional file plan”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on experience and published literature to discuss methods for creating a hybrid functional file plan.

Findings

The paper concludes that functional filing is the only method of filing e‐documents that can effectively support good information management practice, enabling all e‐documents to be managed in line with corporate information management policies, and that it may also be the only viable method of providing true “shared” filing in support of knowledge management and business efficiency.

Originality/value

The article shows that a functional filing scheme, retrieving, cross‐referencing and grouping documents by subject (or other metadata attributes) requires special measures and suggests that current IT, EDRM and related technologies may not fully meet the requirements by searching/sorting on metadata terms. It may be necessary to compromise a purely functional file plan by the inclusion of metadata “signpost” folders into the functional folder structure in order to create a hybrid functional file plan.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

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