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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Nicolay Worren

The purpose of this paper is to describe an analytical approach – functional analysis – that can be used to evaluate the current design of an organization and identify…

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2079

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe an analytical approach – functional analysis – that can be used to evaluate the current design of an organization and identify alternative designs that may increase the ability to realize strategic and operational goals.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach described in this paper is based on key concepts in systems theory and axiomatic design theory (Suh, 1990, 2001). A brief case example is used to illustrate the practical application of the approach.

Findings

It is shown that functional analysis can be used to map the design of an organization and identify key design challenges (e.g. related to overlapping or conflicting functions).

Research limitations/implications

The case study that is described is considered to be a pilot application of the approach as it is based on a limited number of interviews.

Practical implications

This paper should be relevant for applied researchers, management consultants, project managers and others who are analyzing the current structure of an organization and/or are involved in re-designing an organization.

Social implications

Application of the functional approach may improve design processes and thereby enhance the effectiveness of social systems, including public and private sector organizations.

Originality/value

This paper describes how key concepts in systems theory and axiomatic design theory can provide the basis for a new framework for analyzing organization designs.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1988

George Korey

LRC is a technique of particular use as an aid to making complex decisions when the responsibility is shared amongst a group of people.

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165

Abstract

LRC is a technique of particular use as an aid to making complex decisions when the responsibility is shared amongst a group of people.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Abstract

The paper published below was prepared by Taylor Ostrander for Frank Knight’s course, Economic Theory, Economics 301, during the Fall 1933 quarter.

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Documents from F. Taylor Ostrander
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-165-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

George Korey

Quality of academic institutions depends on how well academicactivity is integrated with the right process. This involves thedevelopment of all administrative structures…

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817

Abstract

Quality of academic institutions depends on how well academic activity is integrated with the right process. This involves the development of all administrative structures and efficiency of managing the institution. Team decision‐making (TDM) grid will be of value in strategic planning – through improvement of analysis of activities, problems and decisions within the organizational structure. The system eliminates work duplication and overlapping of responsibilities and invites the interest and participation of faculty. TDM grid can be of great assistance through decentralization of authority and responsibility, elimination of confusion in the preparation of a strategic plan, facilitation of information flow and better motivation of the university community.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Rick Barry

The purpose of this paper is to share the author's opinions on notable electronic records achievements over the past two decades in the USA and current issues and views on

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6686

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to share the author's opinions on notable electronic records achievements over the past two decades in the USA and current issues and views on the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an essay that is based on the author's 50 years in the field of information management, technology management, and records management as a researcher, manager, and consultant. It reviews different technologies used by the typically four generations of workers collaborating in the workplace at the same time, and what this portends for electronic recordkeeping.

Findings

Information managers, archivists, and records managers can gain insights into current and future issues managing electronic records by becoming good observers of changing technologies and their uses by generations soon to enter the workplace. Suggested options for addressing some of the more critical issues are offered, including approaches to technological designs for recordkeeping and a broader view of the potential for better integration of cultural information of all kinds in archives, libraries and museums, as a means of better serving researchers and society.

Originality/value

Evolving technologies and trends in their social usage have presented and will continue to present newer platforms for both personal and organizational work patterns, communications and record making. Modern information technologies and related analytical practices also offer opportunities for addressing some of the long‐standing issues encountered in planning and implementing electronic records systems in such an ever‐changing business world. Recent recordkeeping professionals can benefit from sharing experiences and stories in identifying and making use of such opportunities to move forward from a planning environment to an enterprise implementation environment.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

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Book part
Publication date: 8 April 2005

Fredrik von Corswant

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization…

Abstract

This paper deals with the organizing of interactive product development. Developing products in interaction between firms may provide benefits in terms of specialization, increased innovation, and possibilities to perform development activities in parallel. However, the differentiation of product development among a number of firms also implies that various dependencies need to be dealt with across firm boundaries. How dependencies may be dealt with across firms is related to how product development is organized. The purpose of the paper is to explore dependencies and how interactive product development may be organized with regard to these dependencies.

The analytical framework is based on the industrial network approach, and deals with the development of products in terms of adaptation and combination of heterogeneous resources. There are dependencies between resources, that is, they are embedded, implying that no resource can be developed in isolation. The characteristics of and dependencies related to four main categories of resources (products, production facilities, business units and business relationships) provide a basis for analyzing the organizing of interactive product development.

Three in-depth case studies are used to explore the organizing of interactive product development with regard to dependencies. The first two cases are based on the development of the electrical system and the seats for Volvo’s large car platform (P2), performed in interaction with Delphi and Lear respectively. The third case is based on the interaction between Scania and Dayco/DFC Tech for the development of various pipes and hoses for a new truck model.

The analysis is focused on what different dependencies the firms considered and dealt with, and how product development was organized with regard to these dependencies. It is concluded that there is a complex and dynamic pattern of dependencies that reaches far beyond the developed product as well as beyond individual business units. To deal with these dependencies, development may be organized in teams where several business units are represented. This enables interaction between different business units’ resource collections, which is important for resource adaptation as well as for innovation. The delimiting and relating functions of the team boundary are elaborated upon and it is argued that also teams may be regarded as actors. It is also concluded that a modular product structure may entail a modular organization with regard to the teams, though, interaction between business units and teams is needed. A strong connection between the technical structure and the organizational structure is identified and it is concluded that policies regarding the technical structure (e.g. concerning “carry-over”) cannot be separated from the management of the organizational structure (e.g. the supplier structure). The organizing of product development is in itself a complex and dynamic task that needs to be subject to interaction between business units.

Details

Managing Product Innovation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-311-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

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1289

Abstract

The Nature of Business Policy Business policy — or general management — is concerned with the following six major functions:

Details

Management Decision, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Kevin P. Gallagher, James L. “Jamey” Worrell and Robert M. Mason

For an organization to realize the intended benefits of an enternprise resource planning (ERP) investment, it must integrate both technical expertise and functional area…

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1426

Abstract

Purpose

For an organization to realize the intended benefits of an enternprise resource planning (ERP) investment, it must integrate both technical expertise and functional area knowledge, and it must have continuing support after implementation. The study aims to expand understanding of how organizations ensure the necessary support from functional experts during and after ERP installations. In particular, the study aims to address the question of the type of horizontal support mechanism chosen for this support and how managers make these choices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is a replicated case study based on interviews with project leaders in nine universities judged to have successful PeopleSoft ERP implementations. Thematic analysis is applied to identify the factors influencing managerial choices and organizational decisions made to assure post‐implementation ERP support.

Findings

The findings indicate that managers of ERP implementations recognize the necessity for horizontal coordinating mechanisms both during and after implementation. The paper finds no single “best” structure in the cases, nor does it observe that the support structure decision is always based on a deliberate organizational strategy. The findings indicate that selection of post‐implementation support structure is often a negotiated outcome. Ultimately, the paper finds that the outcomes were based on three factors: the situated context of the original implementation project goals; the nature of early commitments made to functional subject matter experts and their departments; and the initial project structure used during the implementation phase.

Originality/value

This research fills a gap in research on ERP support structures by examining how localized organizations assure the necessary support from subject matter experts, commencing with project inception and continuing through post‐implementation. The results contribute to theory by illustrating the value of a process‐based approach to understanding the factors that affect the choice of support structures. The findings contribute to practice by highlighting how early management decisions and the methods executives chose to assure commitments from key stakeholders can restrict the range of options for post‐implementation organizational structures.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Marcio Lopes Pimenta, Andrea Lago da Silva and Wendy L Tate

The purpose of this paper is to characterize the cross-functional integration processes between marketing and logistics, while considering five basic elements: boundary…

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1047

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to characterize the cross-functional integration processes between marketing and logistics, while considering five basic elements: boundary spanning activities, integration factors, level of integration, formality/informality and impacts of integration.

Design/methodology/approach

After an extensive literature review, five case studies were performed and in-depth interviews conducted. Both within-case and cross-case analysis was performed to better understand the cross-functional integration processes between marketing and logistics.

Findings

A characterization of cross-functional integration in the form of a managerial framework was proposed. This framework presents the elements in a process view, instead of disconnected parts of the integration processes. The framework and process perspective helps to explain the integration process, the roles and impacts of integration within organizations, while considering cultural formality and informality.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative data collection and analysis methods cannot achieve amplitude with respect to sampling nor generalize results. In spite of this, the implications revealed by the propositions may be applied not only to Brazilian companies, but organizations in other countries as well, due to the high level of heterogeneity of the sample, and the fact that they represent multinational organizations. Therefore, further research using broad-based survey data could test the correlations between the elements of cross-functional integration processes.

Practical implications

The identification of the cross-functional integration processes within organizations can help managers to facilitate the efforts of integration between marketing and logistics, reducing conflicts and improving business performance.

Originality/value

Case studies focussing specifically on five Brazilian organizations help provide evidence for an initial definition of cross-functional integration processes by analyzing five key elements according to their characteristics and respective roles. This research provides a strong foundation for future broad-based survey research.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2011

Anna Moses

The purpose of this paper is to explore the area of process ownership and management in cross‐functional make‐or‐buy decision processes.

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1692

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the area of process ownership and management in cross‐functional make‐or‐buy decision processes.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple case studies are used including both a longitudinal in‐depth case study and two retrospective case studies. The data were analyzed using cross‐case comparison as well as analysis through existing literature in the field of make‐or‐buy decision processes, after which propositions for further research were developed.

Findings

The propositions found concern in the fact that the function being responsible for the industrial network also should own the decision process. Letting research and development become a more powerful decision maker and distinguish between different types of make‐or‐buy decisions are also important aspects to consider.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are a first attempt in creating a foundation for future research in the area of process ownership and management of make‐or‐buy decisions. A future need to further develop these propositions is essential.

Practical implications

The function mostly affected by the outcome of the decision should be in charge of the process, and should also be process manager. The process owner should create awareness of different types of make‐or‐buy decisions.

Originality/value

Recently, make‐or‐buy decision processes are considered strategic decision processes, but neither in research nor industry is it clear who should own and manage these decision processes. The paper stretches this fact and brings forth possible owners.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 34 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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