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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Tamoor Khan, Jiangtao Qiu, Ameen Banjar, Riad Alharbey, Ahmed Omar Alzahrani and Rashid Mehmood

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impacts on production of five fruit crops from 1961 to 2018 of energy use, CO2 emissions, farming areas and the labor force in China.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the impacts on production of five fruit crops from 1961 to 2018 of energy use, CO2 emissions, farming areas and the labor force in China.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis applied the autoregressive distributed lag-bound testing (ARDL) approach, Granger causality method and Johansen co-integration test to predict long-term co-integration and relation between variables. Four machine learning methods are used for prediction of the accuracy of climate effect on fruit production.

Findings

The Johansen test findings have shown that the fruit crop growth, energy use, CO2 emissions, harvested land and labor force have a long-term co-integration relation. The outcome of the long-term use of CO2 emission and rural population has a negative influence on fruit crops. The energy consumption, harvested area, total fruit yield and agriculture labor force have a positive influence on six fruit crops. The long-run relationships reveal that a 1% increase in rural population and CO2 will decrease fruit crop production by −0.59 and −1.97. The energy consumption, fruit harvested area, total fruit yield and agriculture labor force will increase fruit crop production by 0.17%, 1.52%, 1.80% and 4.33%, respectively. Furthermore, uni-directional causality is correlated with the growth of fruit crops and energy consumption. Also, the results indicate that the bi-directional causality impact varies from CO2 emissions to agricultural areas to fruit crops.

Originality/value

This study also fills the literature gap in implementing ARDL for agricultural fruits of China, used machine learning methods to examine the impact of climate change and to explore this important issue.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Julius H. Mangisoni

The crop sector in Malawi faces a number of constraints which must be overcome before agriculture can reach its full potential. This paper uses the policy analysis matrix…

Abstract

The crop sector in Malawi faces a number of constraints which must be overcome before agriculture can reach its full potential. This paper uses the policy analysis matrix (PAM) to assess efficiency in the crop sector and financial analysis to explore the potential of investing in a fruit juice extraction plant in Malawi. The PAM revealed that farmers in Malawi are efficient producers but they face negative incentives in the production and marketing of their products. The nominal protection coefficients (NPCs) for both maize and beans were less than 1 while those of inputs were more than 1. Similarly, the effective protection coefficients (EPCs) were less than 1, implying that the combined effect of transfers and tradable inputs is reducing the private profitability of the systems. On the other hand, the financial analysis demonstrated that Malawi can sustain a fruit juice extraction plant. The project had a positive net present value and a benefit/cost ratio greater than 1 (1.16). Recommendations made from the study relate to the need for diversification into fruits that can sustain a fruit juice extraction plant, encouraging private sector participation and reducing disincentives to crop production.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 27 no. 7/8/9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 24 February 2011

Josefa Salete Barbosa Cavalcanti, Mónica Isabel Bendini, Dalva Maria da Mota and Norma Graciela Steimbreger

This chapter probes the issue of capital mobility and its implications in the context of the globalization of the fresh fruit sector. In particular, it explores the…

Abstract

This chapter probes the issue of capital mobility and its implications in the context of the globalization of the fresh fruit sector. In particular, it explores the relationship between productive capital and labor in two different Latin American regions: the Northeast of Brazil and Patagonia in Argentina. Employing a comparative approach, it studies the impact that the insertion of local production into global circuits has on local firms and labor. These relatively culturally and geographically distant locations are affected by similar phenomena created by the globalization of agrifood. Relevant among then are the marginalization of labor and a weak labor structure. While there has been the growth of local firms, this growth has not erased important weaknesses.

Details

Globalization and the Time–Space Reorganization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-318-8

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2009

S. Péneau, A. Linke, F. Escher and J. Nuessli

The aim of this study is to identify descriptions involved in defining the concept of freshness from a consumer perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify descriptions involved in defining the concept of freshness from a consumer perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 559 subjects recruited in supermarkets of different cities and villages in Switzerland were asked to write down their understanding of freshness in general, and for fruits and vegetables in particular. Direct elicitation by means of an open‐ended questionnaire was used.

Findings

Respondents mentioned a large variety of descriptors in relationship with fresh fruits and vegetables. Results suggest that freshness describes a level of closeness to the original product, in terms of distance, time and processing. Respondents having more contact with the place of fruit and vegetable production mentioned non‐sensory attributes more frequently, whereas those having fewer contacts mentioned sensory attributes more frequently. It can be concluded that consumers have a collective concept of freshness but they use their different everyday experiences with fruits and vegetables to describe freshness.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis of open‐ended questionnaires is time‐consuming and difficulties were encountered in the categorisation of phrases. Participants might have been influenced by the environment in supermarkets.

Practical implications

The perception of freshness is influenced by the information consumers have on products. Therefore, the importance of providing sufficient information on the products is emphasized.

Originality/value

The study is the first to extensively investigate the consumer understanding of the term “fresh” in relationship with fruits and vegetables. The use of an open‐ended questionnaire is particularly interesting as it allows greater freedom of expression by the participants compared with other forms of enquiry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Labor Relations in Globalized Food
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-711-5

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2006

Josefa Salete Barbosa Cavalcanti

The provision of food is a critical starting point from which to understand the articulations between production and consumption locales. In research carried in…

Abstract

The provision of food is a critical starting point from which to understand the articulations between production and consumption locales. In research carried in Northeastern Brazil, we have found that increasingly local spaces of production and distribution of food are under tight control by external (retailer) regulations. From the choosing of plots, to land uses, to labour contracting, to cultural, environmental and packing practices, there is much evidence that food quality is an issue under view. On the other, there are widely known concerns about food safety and food security, which, in the Brazilian case, is shown through Hunger Zero – a governmental project to alleviate poverty. In this chapter, I will argue for the relevance of exploring the dynamics of food by looking at local markets, agricultural and supermarkets units, government and labour strategies, as developed in the Northeastern region. Based on case studies and related literature, the argument is that the distribution of food around the world is very much a combination of transnational corporations actions and local development strategies; and without exploring the possible contradiction here, it would not be possible to understand how packing houses, state distribution units as well as agricultural and retailer distribution units would come into the local development agenda, contributing to the making of quality food to the world's consumers. Several case studies developed by our team of researchers will illuminate the analyses.

Details

Between the Local and the Global
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-417-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1967

The long‐awaited regulations to provide statutory compositional requirements for the ever‐increasing range of meat products have at last arrived; presented in the form of…

Abstract

The long‐awaited regulations to provide statutory compositional requirements for the ever‐increasing range of meat products have at last arrived; presented in the form of a triology—The Canned Meat Product Regulations, The Meat Pie and Sausage Roll Regulations and The Sausage and Other Meat Product Regulations—all of which apply to England and Wales only; presumably the Scottish counterparts, modified for the geographical variations in commodities, will appear in due course. The Meat Pie and Sausage Roll Regulations come into operation on May 31 1968; the other two on May 31 1969.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 69 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Uwe Faesel and Roy Hill

Examines the development of Poland′s fruit industry up to 1990,followed by the situation since that year, in which legislative reformswere introduced, mainly to break up…

Abstract

Examines the development of Poland′s fruit industry up to 1990, followed by the situation since that year, in which legislative reforms were introduced, mainly to break up state monopolies and to privatize state assets. Analyses the Polish fruit industry in the light of the resultant shift from a sellers′ to a buyers′ market, discussing the grower, wholesaling, processing and exporting sectors, and finally the role of marketing in exporting. Conducts a SWOT analysis of the industry, as a result of which makes recommendations for: increasing growers′ influence on exports; introducing a new wholesale marketing system; improving processing equipment; rationalizing exportprocedures to the advantage of domestic competition. Sees the current transport and communication set‐ups as significant problems. Concludes that, although the temptation is to follow the capitalist route and opt for the smaller enterprise as an exporting unit, the old Communist‐style large state enterprise is still the ideal vehicle for selling fruit of Poland′s calibre abroad.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to characterize the sexual maturation of M. flexuosa plantations in Tulumayo.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology in this paper was selection of three plots in open field and usage of different densities of planting, after the maturation of the first plants, we began the quarterly evaluation. There was total 28 evaluations in seven years of age.

Findings

As a result, it was determined that at 12 years, the plots with lower density presented a greater number of mature individuals, with a predominance of female palms that produced an average of four bunches of fruit per year, and males five inflorescences. In addition, 15% of adult female plants went dormant, whereas males accounted for 3.4%. Reproductive cycles began in September and culminated in October of the following year, which were synchronized with rainfall.

Originality/value

Planting density was a determining factor in the early maturity of M. flexuosa and sustainable plantation management.

Details

World Journal of Engineering, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1708-5284

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2002

Jan Vannoppen, Wim Verbeke and Guido Van Huylenbroeck

This paper compares consumer motivation for buying “Integrated production” certified and labelled apples through either farm shops or supermarkets. The research…

Abstract

This paper compares consumer motivation for buying “Integrated production” certified and labelled apples through either farm shops or supermarkets. The research methodology builds on means‐end‐chain (MEC) theory, with data collected through personal laddering interviews in Belgium. Hierarchical value maps, which visualise motivational structures of supermarket and farm shop purchase of quality labelled apples, are presented. Apple buyers at both outlet types pursue similar values, with health being paramount, but realise those values through largely different MECs. The findings reveal interactions between market channel characteristics and product attributes. Also, the study shows how outlet choice influences the perception and the motivation structure of the respondents for fresh apples. From the findings, implications pertaining to advertising are set forth through the application of the “Means‐end conceptualisation of the components of advertising strategy” or MECCAS model.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 104 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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