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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Daniel Henrique Bandoni, Kelly Cristina de Moura Bombem, Dirce Maria Lobo Marchioni and Patricia Constante Jaime

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of availability of fruits and vegetables on adult workers' consumption adequacy in the workplace.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of availability of fruits and vegetables on adult workers' consumption adequacy in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,344 workers, who have had meals in 30 different companies, located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, are assessed. Two indicators are used to assess the following: workers' consumption of fruits and vegetables; usual consumption, found through a questionnaire on frequency of consumption of these foods; and workplace consumption, assessed with a food consumption questionnaire provided by the company. Availability of fruits and vegetables in the menus is obtained using the descriptions of meals given to workers on three consecutive days. Data analysis is performed with logistic regression models that used two outcomes: usual consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of these foods in the workplace. Explanatory variables are divided into two levels: the first one was comprised by workers' characteristics (sex, age and level of education), and the second one by food availability in the workplace.

Findings

Consumption of fruits and vegetables, both the usual one and that in the workplace, is higher in women, and also in older individuals and those with higher level of education. Availability of fruits and vegetables in the workplace has a significant impact on usual food consumption and especially on the workplace, in which case the variable shows greatest impact on consumption.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the importance of the availability of fruits and vegetables in the workplace that influence consumption of food by workers, revealing the importance of using this environment to promote healthy eating.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 February 2010

Gregor Torkar, Miša Pintarič and Verena Koch

The purpose of this paper is to measure the effectiveness of fruit and vegetable playing cards for teaching schoolchildren about fruits and vegetables, health, and nutrition.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the effectiveness of fruit and vegetable playing cards for teaching schoolchildren about fruits and vegetables, health, and nutrition.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants come from two primary schools in Slovenia: 53 boys and 57 girls. Their average age is 10 (8, 11). The pre‐intervention questioning is completed two or three days before and post‐intervention questioning is completed a week after playing the card game. The participating children answer ten multiple‐choice questions and one open‐ended question. Each participant plays the game for two 45‐min lessons. The main goal of the research is to measure changes in their knowledge about fruits and vegetables, health, and nutrition.

Findings

After the intervention more children understand why the human body needs dietary fiber, water, and vitamins. The majority of those questioned also understand why fruits and vegetables are important in nutrition. The children learn which fruits and vegetables contain the most vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, dietary fiber, and water.

Originality/value

The evaluation of the fruit and vegetable playing cards demonstrates that this game helps teach children about the nutrients in fruits and vegetables and importance of fruits and vegetables in a healthy diet.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

David Marshall, Annie S. Anderson, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive toimprove Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit andvegetable consumption. Despite…

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Abstract

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive to improve Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Despite various attempts, consumption remains well below World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations. Consumer confusion and complacency towards diet are apparent and the relationship between knowledge about good diet and behaviour is unclear. Highlights the need to consider how consumers make choices. Diet and health are not regarded as a problem for the majority of Scots but the major barriers to increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables reflect the additional costs incurred and the somewhat limited role for these products in Scottish cuisine. Indicates that price incentives and emphasis on the healthy benefits of eating more fruit and vegetables appear to be the most likely to succeed in increasing consumption; but there appear to be more opportunities to increase fruit as opposed to vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1996

Marjon van der Pol and Mandy Ryan

Considers the technique of conjoint analysis as a method for acquiring insights into the preferences for food products. Applies the technique to establish the trade‐offs…

2838

Abstract

Considers the technique of conjoint analysis as a method for acquiring insights into the preferences for food products. Applies the technique to establish the trade‐offs that consumers make between price, quality, convenience to prepare and location of purchase in the purchasing of fruit and vegetables. Also uses the technique to estimate indirectly willingness to pay for the included attributes according to income group. Quality was found to be the most important attribute. Reveals, through segmentation of the price attribute by income, that those on higher incomes had a higher marginal valuation of price. Also suggests that respondents understood the questionnaire, and answered it in a meaningful and consistent way. Suggests that the technique could successfully be used to establish consumer preferences for alternative food products that are commercially feasible.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 98 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2021

Gideon Oluwasogo Odewale, Mosudi Babatunde Sosan, John Adekunle Oyedele Oyekunle and Adeoluwa Oluwaseyi Adeleye

The study assessed the levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks in four regularly consumed fruit vegetables.

Abstract

Purpose

The study assessed the levels of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and their potential non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic health risks in four regularly consumed fruit vegetables.

Design/methodology/approach

The OCPs’ residues were quantified using a gas chromatograph coupled with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and the dietary exposure of children, and adult consumers to the detected OCPs was evaluated using carcinogenic and systemic health risk estimations.

Findings

Aldrin, endrin, endrin aldehyde, a-endosulfan, β-endosulfan, endosulfan sulphate, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide and dieldrin were detected in the four fruit vegetables. The predominant OCP residue in carrot, cucumber, tomatoes and watermelon was endosulfan sulphate with mean concentrations of 2.532 mg kg−1, 1.729 mg kg−1, 2.363 mg kg−1 and 1.154 mg kg−1, respectively. The residues levels in some of the fruit vegetables were higher than their respective maximum residue levels (MRLs) of 0.01–0.05 mg kg−1 set by the European Commission with concentrations above MRLs ranging between 25.5% and 100%. The systemic health risk estimations showed that the hazard index (HI) values for carrot (3.20), cucumber (9.25), tomatoes (50.21) and watermelon (16.76) were >1 for children consumers and the respective HI values of 2.87, 15.57 and 5.20 for adult consumers of cucumber, tomatoes and watermelon were >1 which implies potential systemic health risks. Four carcinogens (aldrin, dieldrin, heptachlor and heptachlor epoxide) had cancer risk index values greater than the acceptable risk of 1 in 1 million for both adult and children consumers.

Originality/value

The paper shows that despite the ban on the use of OCPs in Nigeria, they are still being used for agricultural production especially on some locally produced and regularly consumed fruit vegetables as reported in the present study. The non-existence of surveillance programmes on pesticide usage and the lack of proper monitoring of pesticide residues in food products including fruit and vegetables must have contributed to the levels of the detected OCP in the samples analysed. The current daily intake of OCP via contaminated vegetables may pose potential health risks to both the children and adult consumers of the fruit vegetables.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 124 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Cristina Bianca Pocol, Valentina Marinescu, Dan-Cristian Dabija and Antonio Amuza

The present paper explores Generation Z university students' clusters based on the consumption of daily fruits and vegetables in an emerging market economy, indicating…

Abstract

Purpose

The present paper explores Generation Z university students' clusters based on the consumption of daily fruits and vegetables in an emerging market economy, indicating young people's reasons to adopt a healthy diet.

Design/methodology/approach

Using cluster theory, the authors analyse Generation Z university students who consume fresh fruits and vegetables, highlighting aspects of a healthy diet, in compliance with the WHO recommendations and challenges.

Findings

Data collected from over 459 Generation Z university students point out the possibility of typologizing them into nine clusters: three consuming fresh fruit and six consuming fresh vegetables. Most cluster members are aware of the value of regular fresh fruit and vegetable consumption in order to maintain health and overall well-being, but the authors also identified a cluster called “urban, but sick humanists at the beginning of their professional careers”, for whom a healthy diet based on fruits and vegetables is not a priority.

Research limitations/implications

Although this research only refers to consumers in the emergent economy Romania, it also allows the delimitation of specific categories which can be utilized by sector stakeholders, in order to identify issues addressed by each cluster member and to find the most appropriate solutions for encouraging/promoting a healthy diet.

Social implications

The paper also raises awareness of the importance of fruit and vegetable consumption in other emerging economies, given the advancement of processed food and reduction of time available to cook healthy dishes.

Originality/value

The results contribute to extending studies conducted on emerging markets concerning fruit and vegetable consumption among Generation Z university students, highlighting the importance of a healthy diet, and the proper targeting of these consumer clusters by fresh fruit and vegetable producers and distributors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 February 2015

Charlotte Taylor, Penney Upton and Dominic Upton

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence base of the Food Dudes healthy eating programme, specifically the short- and long-term effectiveness of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence base of the Food Dudes healthy eating programme, specifically the short- and long-term effectiveness of the intervention for consumption of fruit and vegetables both at school and at home and displacement of unhealthy snack consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles were identified using Academic Search Complete, PsycARTICLES, Medline and PubMed databases keywords for the period January 1995 to August 2013. Articles were included if they reported an empirical evaluation of the Food Dudes programme aimed at children aged between 4-11 years. Articles were included regardless of geographical location and publication type (i.e. published and “grey” literature).

Findings

Six articles were included for review. Findings indicated that the programme was moderately effective in the short term; however, the long-term effectiveness of the programme is unknown. The ability of the programme to generalise to the home setting and to displace unhealthy snack foods also requires further investigation.

Originality/value

This is the first independent review of the Food Dudes programme. In light of the extensive roll out of the Food Dudes programme, an appraisal of the evidence surrounding the programme is timely. The review highlights that sustaining fruit and vegetable intake cannot be achieved through behaviour-based interventions alone and the long-term maintenance of fruit and vegetable consumption requires more than the implementation of an intervention found to be effective in a controlled research environment.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2011

Kang Ernest Liu, Hung‐Hao Chang and Wen S. Chern

The purpose of this paper is to fill a knowledge gap by examining the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption of Chinese households.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to fill a knowledge gap by examining the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption of Chinese households.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 1993 and 2001 household survey data from three selected provinces in China, the authors estimated a quantile regression (QR) model to demonstrate how changes of fresh fruit and vegetable consumption over time may differ across regions, and additionally, how these changes may differ over the entire distribution.

Findings

Results show significant increases in fresh fruit consumption for all provinces; in addition, the pattern of changes over time differs across the entire distribution. In contrast, significant decreases of fresh vegetable consumption are evident, and results are robust across regions; however, the disparities of fresh vegetable consumption across regions are not significant.

Research limitations/implications

The results may shed some light on the national food policy. First, any food policy that may affect prices of fresh fruits and vegetables will likely affect households in lower percentiles more than those in upper percentiles. In addition, based on the findings, households in Guangdong may have a higher risk of inadequate fruit consumption. Lower level consumption of fruits in Guangdong may be caused by its relatively high prices of fruits and perhaps the shifting consumption pattern to a more meat‐based diet as income increases.

Originality/value

There has been considerable interest in estimating food demand structure in China due to its huge market for food products. However, little is known about the fruits and vegetables products. In addition, most of the previous studies used the linear regression‐type model for analysis, which fails to capture the effects of the exogenous factors on the entire distribution. To fill the knowledge gap, this paper uses a QR model with the different‐in‐difference method to examine the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption of Chinese households.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2016

Rachel Povey, Lisa Cowap and Lucy Gratton

The purpose of this paper is to explore primary school children’s beliefs towards eating fruit and vegetables in a deprived area in England.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore primary school children’s beliefs towards eating fruit and vegetables in a deprived area in England.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 children aged 9-11 from an after school club at a primary school in a deprived area in the West Midlands. Interviews were analysed using inductive thematic analysis.

Findings

Six master themes emerged from the data: “effect on the senses”, “feelings about food”, “healthy vs unhealthy foods”, “effects on health”, “convenience” and “family and friends”. Analysis showed that children seemed to have a very good awareness of the health benefits of eating fruit and vegetables. However, negative beliefs were associated with sensory perceptions (such as taste, texture, appearance and aroma), availability, and the competing desirability of other, unhealthy foods. Also, although parents were key influences, siblings and friends were often perceived as negative influences and would tease children about eating fruit and vegetables.

Practical implications

Suggestions for interventions include increasing the appeal and availability of pre-prepared fruits and vegetables in both home and school environments. Additionally, an approach to eating more fruit and vegetables which focusses on siblings and friends is advocated as these groups appear to play a key role in terms of promoting the consumption of these foods.

Originality/value

This study is novel as it uses individual interviews to explore primary school children’s attitudes towards fruit and vegetable consumption in a deprived area in England. By focussing on the specific behaviours of fruit and vegetable consumption, the findings aid the development of interventions that are designed to improve children’s healthy eating behaviour.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 118 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 March 2009

S. Péneau, A. Linke, F. Escher and J. Nuessli

The aim of this study is to identify descriptions involved in defining the concept of freshness from a consumer perspective.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to identify descriptions involved in defining the concept of freshness from a consumer perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 559 subjects recruited in supermarkets of different cities and villages in Switzerland were asked to write down their understanding of freshness in general, and for fruits and vegetables in particular. Direct elicitation by means of an open‐ended questionnaire was used.

Findings

Respondents mentioned a large variety of descriptors in relationship with fresh fruits and vegetables. Results suggest that freshness describes a level of closeness to the original product, in terms of distance, time and processing. Respondents having more contact with the place of fruit and vegetable production mentioned non‐sensory attributes more frequently, whereas those having fewer contacts mentioned sensory attributes more frequently. It can be concluded that consumers have a collective concept of freshness but they use their different everyday experiences with fruits and vegetables to describe freshness.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis of open‐ended questionnaires is time‐consuming and difficulties were encountered in the categorisation of phrases. Participants might have been influenced by the environment in supermarkets.

Practical implications

The perception of freshness is influenced by the information consumers have on products. Therefore, the importance of providing sufficient information on the products is emphasized.

Originality/value

The study is the first to extensively investigate the consumer understanding of the term “fresh” in relationship with fruits and vegetables. The use of an open‐ended questionnaire is particularly interesting as it allows greater freedom of expression by the participants compared with other forms of enquiry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000