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Article

Daniel Henrique Bandoni, Kelly Cristina de Moura Bombem, Dirce Maria Lobo Marchioni and Patricia Constante Jaime

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of availability of fruits and vegetables on adult workers' consumption adequacy in the workplace.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the influence of availability of fruits and vegetables on adult workers' consumption adequacy in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,344 workers, who have had meals in 30 different companies, located in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, are assessed. Two indicators are used to assess the following: workers' consumption of fruits and vegetables; usual consumption, found through a questionnaire on frequency of consumption of these foods; and workplace consumption, assessed with a food consumption questionnaire provided by the company. Availability of fruits and vegetables in the menus is obtained using the descriptions of meals given to workers on three consecutive days. Data analysis is performed with logistic regression models that used two outcomes: usual consumption of fruits and vegetables and consumption of these foods in the workplace. Explanatory variables are divided into two levels: the first one was comprised by workers' characteristics (sex, age and level of education), and the second one by food availability in the workplace.

Findings

Consumption of fruits and vegetables, both the usual one and that in the workplace, is higher in women, and also in older individuals and those with higher level of education. Availability of fruits and vegetables in the workplace has a significant impact on usual food consumption and especially on the workplace, in which case the variable shows greatest impact on consumption.

Originality/value

This study demonstrates the importance of the availability of fruits and vegetables in the workplace that influence consumption of food by workers, revealing the importance of using this environment to promote healthy eating.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

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Article

Charlotte Taylor, Penney Upton and Dominic Upton

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence base of the Food Dudes healthy eating programme, specifically the short- and long-term effectiveness of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence base of the Food Dudes healthy eating programme, specifically the short- and long-term effectiveness of the intervention for consumption of fruit and vegetables both at school and at home and displacement of unhealthy snack consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Articles were identified using Academic Search Complete, PsycARTICLES, Medline and PubMed databases keywords for the period January 1995 to August 2013. Articles were included if they reported an empirical evaluation of the Food Dudes programme aimed at children aged between 4-11 years. Articles were included regardless of geographical location and publication type (i.e. published and “grey” literature).

Findings

Six articles were included for review. Findings indicated that the programme was moderately effective in the short term; however, the long-term effectiveness of the programme is unknown. The ability of the programme to generalise to the home setting and to displace unhealthy snack foods also requires further investigation.

Originality/value

This is the first independent review of the Food Dudes programme. In light of the extensive roll out of the Food Dudes programme, an appraisal of the evidence surrounding the programme is timely. The review highlights that sustaining fruit and vegetable intake cannot be achieved through behaviour-based interventions alone and the long-term maintenance of fruit and vegetable consumption requires more than the implementation of an intervention found to be effective in a controlled research environment.

Details

Health Education, vol. 115 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Kang Ernest Liu, Hung‐Hao Chang and Wen S. Chern

The purpose of this paper is to fill a knowledge gap by examining the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption of Chinese households.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to fill a knowledge gap by examining the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption of Chinese households.

Design/methodology/approach

Using 1993 and 2001 household survey data from three selected provinces in China, the authors estimated a quantile regression (QR) model to demonstrate how changes of fresh fruit and vegetable consumption over time may differ across regions, and additionally, how these changes may differ over the entire distribution.

Findings

Results show significant increases in fresh fruit consumption for all provinces; in addition, the pattern of changes over time differs across the entire distribution. In contrast, significant decreases of fresh vegetable consumption are evident, and results are robust across regions; however, the disparities of fresh vegetable consumption across regions are not significant.

Research limitations/implications

The results may shed some light on the national food policy. First, any food policy that may affect prices of fresh fruits and vegetables will likely affect households in lower percentiles more than those in upper percentiles. In addition, based on the findings, households in Guangdong may have a higher risk of inadequate fruit consumption. Lower level consumption of fruits in Guangdong may be caused by its relatively high prices of fruits and perhaps the shifting consumption pattern to a more meat‐based diet as income increases.

Originality/value

There has been considerable interest in estimating food demand structure in China due to its huge market for food products. However, little is known about the fruits and vegetables products. In addition, most of the previous studies used the linear regression‐type model for analysis, which fails to capture the effects of the exogenous factors on the entire distribution. To fill the knowledge gap, this paper uses a QR model with the different‐in‐difference method to examine the changes in fruit and vegetable consumption of Chinese households.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

Keywords

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Article

Emma Dresler, Dean Whitehead and Aimee Mather

It is known that the consumption of fruits and vegetables in children is declining despite wide-spread national and international policy attempts to increase consumption

Abstract

Purpose

It is known that the consumption of fruits and vegetables in children is declining despite wide-spread national and international policy attempts to increase consumption. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the experiences of children’s consumption of fruits and vegetables so as to facilitate better health education targeting.

Design/methodology/approach

In this qualitative descriptive exploratory study, peer group interviews were undertaken with 18 girls and 18 boys, aged 8-11, from schools in the Manawatu region of New Zealand.

Findings

The results show that children’s consumption of fruits and vegetables is dependent on balancing risk and reward. Children know and understand the importance of eating fruits and vegetables; however, the perceived risks are typically the prevailing determinant of consumption. These perceived risks often stem from children’s uncertainty about whether the fruits and vegetables will meet the child’s sensory preferences. To mitigate the risks perceived in eating fruits and vegetables, children employ a range of avoidance strategies.

Originality/value

This study’s results indicate that a model of “associated” risk is a valuable tool to explain children’s fruit and vegetable consumption and preference behaviour and to assist in the development of future health education intervention campaigns.

Details

Health Education, vol. 117 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Ireen Raaijmakers, Siet Sijtsema, Caroline Labrie and Harriette Snoek

More tailored interventions and campaigns are needed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption to recommended levels. The purpose of this paper is to explore which…

Abstract

Purpose

More tailored interventions and campaigns are needed to increase fruit and vegetable consumption to recommended levels. The purpose of this paper is to explore which consumer groups exist based on both their fruit and vegetable consumption level and their health-related motive orientations (HRMO), and to compare the revealed consumer clusters regarding their fruit and vegetable product attribute importance.

Design/methodology/approach

In the Netherlands an online panel survey was carried out resulting in 1,296 respondents. The clusters based on HRMO and fruit and vegetable intake are profiled with respect to demographics and product attribute importance.

Findings

Cluster analysis revealed six homogeneous consumer clusters with different HRMO and fruit and vegetable consumption levels. In addition, these clusters show a different socio-demographic profile and differ in their importance ratings of fruit and vegetable product attributes.

Practical implications

The results show that health is a multidimensional construct suggesting that there is a need for addressing health in interventions and campaigns in a more tailored approach.

Originality/value

This study shows that the combination of both usage- and psychographic segmentation variables provide valuable and interesting information that give insights in addressing different target groups. Moreover, this study elaborates on previous research by showing that health is a multidimensional construct and that Dutch consumers differ in their HRMO.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 120 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Helen Burchett

This paper aimed to identify the key elements that should be included in a fruit and vegetable‐promoting programme in British primary schools. Such a programme could be…

Abstract

This paper aimed to identify the key elements that should be included in a fruit and vegetable‐promoting programme in British primary schools. Such a programme could be used in healthy schools schemes or “five‐a‐day” programmes. Five US school intervention studies were analysed to identify their most effective elements. Four of the five studies found that their intervention had a significant effect on fruit and vegetable consumption. All the studies were behaviourally focussed and used interactive teaching methods and were based on social cognitive theory. Targeting fruit and vegetable consumption appeared to be more effective than broader lifestyle/healthy eating interventions. All studies, except one, increased the availability of fruit and vegetables at school lunches but none increased their availability at snack times and breakfast. Three studies taught preparation skills. All included taste testing activities which aim to increase familiarity and so increase taste preferences. Four used role models to promote fruit and vegetables and two gave rewards for consumption. One study attempted to improve the sensory properties of fruit and vegetables at lunch through preparation techniques. Two studies included a community involvement component and four involved families in the intervention. Results from two of the studies showed that interventions must be maintained over time if effects are to be maintained. Greater effects were seen for fruit consumption than vegetable consumption except for one study which focussed specifically on vegetables.

Details

Health Education, vol. 103 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

David Marshall, Annie S. Anderson, Mike Lean and Ann Foster

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive toimprove Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit andvegetable consumption. Despite…

Abstract

Scotland has a poor diet‐related health record and part of the drive to improve Scottish diet has focused attention on increasing fruit and vegetable consumption. Despite various attempts, consumption remains well below World Health Organisation (WHO) recommendations. Consumer confusion and complacency towards diet are apparent and the relationship between knowledge about good diet and behaviour is unclear. Highlights the need to consider how consumers make choices. Diet and health are not regarded as a problem for the majority of Scots but the major barriers to increasing consumption of fruit and vegetables reflect the additional costs incurred and the somewhat limited role for these products in Scottish cuisine. Indicates that price incentives and emphasis on the healthy benefits of eating more fruit and vegetables appear to be the most likely to succeed in increasing consumption; but there appear to be more opportunities to increase fruit as opposed to vegetable consumption.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 96 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Kanayo Umeh and Lucy Crabtree

The purpose of this paper is to assess the utility of rationalistic constructs for predicting fruit and vegetable intake in children. It was hypothesised that children's…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the utility of rationalistic constructs for predicting fruit and vegetable intake in children. It was hypothesised that children's gain‐loss evaluations will predict their stage of uptake irrespective of important additional variables.

Design/methodology/approach

Over 200 pupils from a Derbyshire secondary school completed a cross‐sectional questionnaire assessing stages‐of‐change (precontemplation, contemplation, preparation, action, maintenance), gain‐loss considerations, prior consumption, self‐efficacy, and attitude.

Findings

Discriminant function analysis revealed self‐efficacy, attitude, and previous consumption as significant predictors of group membership for both fruit and vegetable intake. Group centroids indicated clear separation of earlier from later stages, and transitional from other stages. Gain‐loss appraisals failed to predict stage membership. Finally, 63.4 and 59.1 per cent of original grouped cases for vegetable and fruit consumption, respectively, were correctly classified. However, classification accuracy varied across stages.

Research limitations/implications

The sample was predominantly Caucasian and from a suburban area. Thus, the generality of these findings to children from other demographics is unclear.

Practical implications

Interventions promoting fruit/vegetable intake in children may lack efficacy if they emphasise possible outcomes (e.g. benefits) associated with eating these foods. Modifying opinions and suggesting easier ways to increase consumption may achieve better results.

Originality/value

Previous research has demonstrated the importance of gain‐loss considerations in adult's stage of fruit/vegetable intake. The current paper extends this literature to children; it appears rationalistic constructs play a negligible role in children when considered within the context of other variables.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Suzi Leather

Opens by identifying fruit and vegetable consumption differencesbetween socio‐economic groups in Britain. Goes on to outline currentunderstanding of antioxidants and the…

Abstract

Opens by identifying fruit and vegetable consumption differences between socio‐economic groups in Britain. Goes on to outline current understanding of antioxidants and the role they have in preventing or stemming disease processes. Explores factors which determine consumption of fruit and vegetables across all social groups, before considering in detail the impact of inadequate income. Considers the relationship between smoking, low income and fruit and vegetable consumption and notes that despite increased antioxidant requirements smokers on low income exhibit lower levels of consumption. Rejects the notion that such purchasing patterns are irrational in the circumstances and concludes that a national healthy diet policy, particularly one which increases the consumption of fruit and vegetables, cannot be dissociated from social protection.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 97 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article

Evelien Reinaerts, Jascha de Nooijer, Angélique van de Kar and Nanne de Vries

The purpose of this research is to explore individual and social factors that are associated with children's F&V (fruit and vegetable) intake in order to develop a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to explore individual and social factors that are associated with children's F&V (fruit and vegetable) intake in order to develop a school‐based intervention to increase their F&V consumption.

Design/methodology/approach

Group interviews were conducted with ten groups of Dutch children (n=104), aged 4‐12 years, and two groups of parents (n=28). Additionally, a total of ten parents participated in an interview by telephone. Opinions about the actual F&V consumption, awareness of consumption patterns, attitudes towards F&V, promotion of F&V consumption by parents and F&V intake at school were explored. Transcripts were analysed using Nvivo 2.0.

Findings

Several factors that are likely to increase F&V consumption of the participants were identified, such as preferences, modeling of F&V consumption by teachers and parents and availability of F&V in ready‐to‐eat form at home and school. Although both children and parents favoured activities to promote F&V at school, most parents were not willing to participate in these activities.

Research limitations/implications

The present study obtains information from a broad perspective, and not from a representative sample.

Practical implications

This article is a useful source for health promotion planners that are developing food‐related interventions for children.

Originality/value

Information on factors that influence children's F&V consumption is usually acquired through parents. It is questionable whether parents are aware of the factors that influence their children's food choice. Therefore this study combined information gathered among parents with information gathered directly among children.

Details

Health Education, vol. 106 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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