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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Wayne Martindale

The purpose of this paper is to define the sustainability attributes of frozen and fresh food consumption in a typical household. The reason for writing this paper is that…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define the sustainability attributes of frozen and fresh food consumption in a typical household. The reason for writing this paper is that food preservation is often overlooked when developing sustainability strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses established carbon footprint data for specific food types and consumer survey data to determine how consumers use fresh and frozen products in the home. Consumption and waste data for 83 households was obtained using a combination of narrative and graphical association questions.

Findings

The results show greenhouse gas emissions associated with a diets containing frozen food are reduced because 47 per cent less frozen foods is wasted as compared to fresh foods with a typical household wasting 10.4 per cent of fresh food and 5.9 per cent frozen food.

Research limitations/implications

This research has highlighted the importance of understanding the waste impacts of catering and food service consumption outside the home.

Practical implications

This research will guide future product development for frozen foods with regard to dietary planning and portion control.

Social implications

The cost and sustainability benefits of meal planning are identified and these will inform policy making and education to improve dietary choices.

Originality/value

This work extends the scope of current consumer surveys that assess quality, value and taste attributes to sustainability criteria and it will enable collaboration between fresh and frozen product categories to deliver sustainable dietary options.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Hristina Dzhogleva Nikolova, J. Jeffrey Inman, Jim Maurer, Andrew Greiner and Gala Amoroso

In the age of “big data,” one of the most important capabilities that differentiates the winners from the losers in the intensely competitive grocery market is how…

Abstract

In the age of “big data,” one of the most important capabilities that differentiates the winners from the losers in the intensely competitive grocery market is how successfully a firm can harness its vast amounts of shopper data to become more shopper-centric. Grocery retailers struggle with how to manage the tremendous amount of data available to them and best leverage their frequent shopper data to derive insights. These data also present an opportunity for academic research on decision-making and evaluation of strategic initiatives. This chapter discusses three case studies that illustrate the various capabilities of frequent shopper data in generating shopper insights. Specifically, using frequent shopper data for millions of shoppers, the three case studies demonstrate how frequent shopper data can be used as an important information asset for understanding differences and similarities among different shopper groups (Case Study 1), as a means to assess the effectiveness of store redesigns/environment changes (Case Study 2), and as a key tool for evaluating program success (Case Study 3). The chapter concludes with a discussion of how successful collaboration between practitioners and academics can be a boon to both business success and academic research.

Details

Shopper Marketing and the Role of In-Store Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-001-8

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Beate Silvia Kölzer, Jasmin Geppert, Astrid Klingshirn, Harald Weber, Lilla Brugger, Antje Engstler, Jochen Härlen, Thomas Ertel, Thomas Gindele and Rainer Stamminger

More than 50 per cent of all German households own a freezing appliance and so far the market of frozen foods is constantly increasing (1 per cent from 2017 to 2018)…

Abstract

Purpose

More than 50 per cent of all German households own a freezing appliance and so far the market of frozen foods is constantly increasing (1 per cent from 2017 to 2018). Despite frozen foods playing an important role in our everyday life, little is known about the consumer’s habits at home. The purpose of this paper is to uncover gaps in the knowledge about consumer behaviour when handling frozen food. Moreover, the impact of consumers on the quality of frozen products should be assessed.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative online survey was carried out to investigate different aspects of consumer behaviour concerning frozen foods. Respondents (n=2,053) were questioned about their general handling habits regarding eight different food groups: fruit, vegetables, meat, fish, bread, pastries, ready-to-eat meals and leftovers. The focus was on freezing, pre-handling, packaging and thawing – depending on the age of those questioned and combined with best practice advice regarding quality storage of frozen products.

Findings

Most Germans have the opportunity to freeze food and keep their freezers full or medium loaded. Older participants act more efficiently towards quality storage, but more education about freezing and frozen storage would be generally helpful to maintain quality of frozen foods and increase utilisation of freezers, using their full preservation potential.

Research limitations/implications

No open questions were asked due to the scope of more than 2,000 participants, which, in retrospect, would have been instructive.

Originality/value

Consumer handling of frozen food in Germany was investigated in a representative way for the first time, covering age groups from 18 to 69 and household sizes from 1 to >4 people, focussing on eight major food groups.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Wayne Martindale and Walter Schiebel

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship between food preservation and reducing consumer waste is of value in developing sustainable meal options. The…

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16282

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the relationship between food preservation and reducing consumer waste is of value in developing sustainable meal options. The research reports insights into Austrian marketplace for frozen and fresh foods that have been obtained from a consumer survey.

Design/methodology/approach

The consumer survey methodologies indicate how preservation can change meal planning and lower food waste across frozen and fresh and ambient food purchases using freezing preservation methods.

Findings

The results show food waste can be reduced by six-fold when frozen foods are compared with fresh foods.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the requirement for a greater understanding of the probability that specific foods will be wasted with respect to the frequency of purchase. This is a limitation of the current study that has been investigated by other researchers.

Practical implications

This research has enabled the identification of different food waste amounts for different food product categories. The data presented could be used to guide food product development so that less consumer waste is produced.

Social implications

The research suggests a decision matrix approach can be used to can guide new product development and a model of this matrix is presented so that it may provide fit-for-purpose food preservation options for consumers.

Originality/value

This paper will continue to highlight the overlooked value of food preservation during processing and manufacturing of foods and their preparation in households.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1982

Another Christmas month is upon us, following it seems quickly on others that have been. Such is the relativity of Time, it is not yesteryear, but could be yester‐month or…

Abstract

Another Christmas month is upon us, following it seems quickly on others that have been. Such is the relativity of Time, it is not yesteryear, but could be yester‐month or even yester‐week. The seasons pass like youth, all too soon. Our minds return to other Christmas months of yore — “Memories are like Christmas roses!”, the old saying goes. The children, singing much‐loved hymns and carols, happy family settings, a birth, christening, so much to look forward to in the new year. There are not always such happy memories, but memories just the same — Christmas in war‐time, Earth's joys growing dimmer each year, change and decay, life drawing to a close for many a soul; old folk tend to see Christmas as a time of passing, of leaving the world behind.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 84 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1973

Graham Kemp

In this special market analysis report, we take a look at the burgeoning home freezer business — an estimated 11 per cent home ownership by the end of this year. This has…

Abstract

In this special market analysis report, we take a look at the burgeoning home freezer business — an estimated 11 per cent home ownership by the end of this year. This has stimulated the development of home freezer centres, selling frozen food in excess of £20 million. Multiples and supermarkets, as one might expect, are reacting promptly. The trend towards less frequent shopping plus likely development of off‐centre superstores, argues favourably for the long‐term prospects.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1992

Mark Woolfe

Summarizes legislation which determines specific temperaturerequirements for refrigerated foods in the United Kingdom pre –and post‐1990. Before 1990 there were relatively…

Abstract

Summarizes legislation which determines specific temperature requirements for refrigerated foods in the United Kingdom pre – and post‐1990. Before 1990 there were relatively few specific national controls, although controls existed for certain animal‐based products such as meat and meat products destined for intra‐Community trade. Post‐1990 came the Food Safety Act 1990 and Food Hygiene (Amendment) Regulations 1990, which have had most effect on the chill chain from production through to retail sale, and in the catering sector. Temperature controls have been strengthened by monitoring and systems of record‐keeping. The other source of legislation has been through the implementation of single European market measures, many of which will come into force on 1 January 1993.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 94 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Jean C. Darian and Judy Cohen

Investigates whether consumers′ time availability is an importantsegmentation variable in the convenience and fast‐food markets. Verytime‐poor, somewhat time‐poor, and not…

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3657

Abstract

Investigates whether consumers′ time availability is an important segmentation variable in the convenience and fast‐food markets. Very time‐poor, somewhat time‐poor, and not time‐poor consumers are compared, and three types of food are examined: fast foods, frozen dinners, and ready‐to‐eat foods. For weekday dinners, similarities and differences between the three segments are investigated with respect to usage of each type of food, importance of benefits sought in a weekday dinner, and perceptions of each type of food. Managerial implications of differences between segments and of overall patterns are discussed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1972

A.G. Cameron

What a terrible word for a title; but its intentional horribleness emphasises the fact that the arrival and proliferation of supermarkets in every High Street constitutes…

Abstract

What a terrible word for a title; but its intentional horribleness emphasises the fact that the arrival and proliferation of supermarkets in every High Street constitutes nothing less than a revolution in our way of life. A whole new technology — food technology — has been harnessed to the concept of mass selling to produce a completely new technique of food retailing. The extent of this revolution can be gauged from the estimate that soon three‐quarters of all food sales will be from self‐service stores and supermarkets.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1984

Things seem to be going desperately wrong with the concept of the “brave new world” predicted by the starry‐eyed optimists after the Second World War finally came to an…

Abstract

Things seem to be going desperately wrong with the concept of the “brave new world” predicted by the starry‐eyed optimists after the Second World War finally came to an end. To those who listen only to what they want to hear, see everything, not as it is, but as they would like it to be, a new society could be initiated and the lusty infant would emerge as a paragon for all the world to follow. The new society in truth never really got off the ground the biggest mistake of all was to cushion millions of people against the results of their own folly; to shelter them from the blasts of the ensuing economic climate. The sheltered ones were not necessarily the ordinary mass of people; many in fact were the victims and suffered the consequences. And now that the state has reached a massive crescendo, many are suffering profoundly. The big nationalised industries and vast services, such as the national health service, education, where losses in the case of the first are met by Government millions, requests to trim the extravagant spending is akin to sacrilege in the latter, have removed such terms as thrift, careful spending, value for money from the vocabulary.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 86 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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