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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Jan Bentzen and Valdemar Smith

In the Spring of 1995 the French military announced a series of nuclear tests to take place at the Muroroa atoll later that year. Despite worldwide protests a nuclear test…

Abstract

In the Spring of 1995 the French military announced a series of nuclear tests to take place at the Muroroa atoll later that year. Despite worldwide protests a nuclear test series of six bombs was carried out from September 1995 to January 1996. In some countries, e.g. Denmark, the public reaction to the test series was quite strong and during the nuclear testing period in the South Pacific many consumers substituted goods from other countries, especially wine, for French goods. This paper analyses the demand for French wine in Denmark with focus on the effects of the nuclear tests on the Danish import of French wine. The effects, if any, may be temporary or more permanent, affecting the consumption of French wine in Denmark in the long run. By the use of monthly data for the Danish import of red wine and white wine, the long‐run trends in these variables are extracted and the analysis of these are in favour of wine import boycott effects of a temporary nature in late 1995 and early 1996 and possibly a minor permanent effect for French red wine on the Danish market.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Warren Pike and T.C. Melewar

Independent French wine producers are faced with excessive costs and a declining image of quality compared with their New World competitors. A confusing offer and weak…

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12963

Abstract

Purpose

Independent French wine producers are faced with excessive costs and a declining image of quality compared with their New World competitors. A confusing offer and weak brand identities also make their often poorly marketed products less attractive at the point of sale. As production continues to surge, plummeting prices have left many of these producers economically unviable. Is it possible for these small independent producers to survive in an ever more competitive global market? This paper attempts to answer this question, by studying the challenges confronting this group, as well as their advantages, both in their home and on a global market.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature in French and English was reviewed in highlighting key issues impinging the industry. A small survey was conducted to ascertain the drinking habits of young adults market in France. Also SWOT, PESTLE, and Porter’s Five Forces were used in presenting a more strructured approach in discussing the nature of and challenges facing this industry.

Findings

It is evident that a lot of work needs to be done for French wines to regain their global competitiveness, and even more so for small producers who do not benefit from the massive promotional budgets of their larger competitors. However, by ensuring a superior level of quality, higher production costs can be justified, while still being carefully managed to ensure that all additional costs incurred add value to the end product. This quality needs to be guaranteed by a stronger and clearer AOC system that is regularly evaluated to maintain its credibility, and reinforced by a strong individual brand image, in order to gain consumer confidence. A cultural change is also necessary, away from defence and towards a more proactive approach. The innovation for which French winemakers were once famous must be reclaimed.

Research limitations/implications

It would be interesting to further study the cultural metamorphosis that has taken place amongst French winemakers over the course of the last century. The comparative bargaining power of small producers against large supermarket chains is also a topic that could be further explored. Given that it will not be possible for all producers to become a key reference and guarantee shelf space amongst their highly marketed competitors, greater research into more innovative ways of getting products to market would be extremely useful.

Practical implications

Foreign markets should be highly studied and understood before entry. Integrating products into local culture is often more successful than imposing the product as part of the culture of the producing country. Most importantly, however, producers should be prepared to adapt to a changing market and to invest in order to secure future capital inflows. The rise of new global players, such as China, will only intensify competition, and today’s less sophisticated consumers are more likely to be swayed by low prices and strong brands than by an overpriced and poorly positioned product from “Old Europe”.

Originality/value

A fairly thorough account of the current state of affairs of the wine industry in France has been presented and both the French literature and relevant web sites in French have been reviewed in highlighting and evaluating issues impinging the wine industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 17 December 2019

Antonio Iazzi, Paola Scorrano, Pierfelice Rosato and Balakrishna Grandhi

The purpose of this paper is to verify the preferences for the purchase of rosé wine by Italian and French Millennials, with the aim of allowing Italian companies to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to verify the preferences for the purchase of rosé wine by Italian and French Millennials, with the aim of allowing Italian companies to acquire knowledge in improving the positioning of this product in both the Italian and French markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involved a descriptive survey conducted between December 2018 and January 2019 on Millennials residing in Italy and France, intercepted via Facebook. In total, 500 valid responses to a highly structured self-administered questionnaire were collected. Descriptive and multivariate analysis techniques were used to examine the responses.

Findings

The two groups of Millennials show different preferences in the purchase of rosé wine. French Millennials rarely buy the product, and perhaps only for reasonable prices. Their purchasing process involves no characteristics of particular importance. On the other hand, Italian Millennials buy the product with a higher frequency and show a greater propensity to spend. In general, they attribute greater importance (though not a great deal of importance) to the characteristics of the product, paying attention to both its intrinsic aspects and its territorial origin and the quality certifications.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of the research is the small sample size. Future insights into the consumption of rosé wine will be sought in other significant European markets.

Practical implications

This study is of value to academic researchers, wine industry practitioners and other members of the wine distribution channel, as it provides insights into consumer behavior differences.

Originality/value

This research is the first to compare rosé wine preferences of Millennials in France and Italy.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Lisa C. Thomas, Sandra Painbéni and Harry Barton

The aim of this paper is to develop an understanding of the value and application of entrepreneurial marketing within the French wine industry.

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2992

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to develop an understanding of the value and application of entrepreneurial marketing within the French wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Following an initial review of the literature describing the nature of entrepreneurial marketing and its potential application within the wine industry, a case study is presented of a small independent winery of the Côtes du Rhône in order to explore the theory and practice of entrepreneurial marketing in this commercially important French wine growing region.

Findings

The marketing approach adopted by the case company is found to contrast with the traditional adversarial approach to competition prevalent throughout the French wine industry. The case study illustrates how entrepreneurial marketing has allowed the leverage of superior knowledge of customer preferences, market intelligence and product knowledge in the process of delivering superior value to the customer through brand differentiation at firm level. Additionally, engaging in cooperative relationship development at regional and international level appears significant in creating opportunities for knowledge acquisition and innovation.

Originality/value

The research provides interesting insights into the potential value of the adoption of entrepreneurial marketing by small wineries in France.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Nathalie Guibert

This paper sets out to investigate the view that a firm's strategy in a marketing channel is contingent on the organization of its related upstream network of embeddedness.

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1559

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to investigate the view that a firm's strategy in a marketing channel is contingent on the organization of its related upstream network of embeddedness.

Design/methodology/approach

An in‐depth documentary study of recent developments in marketing channels in the French Rhône Valley Appellation d'Origine Controlée wine industry combined with content analysis of qualitative data derived from interviews with local wine merchants and Inter‐Rhône wine experts.

Findings

The extended theoretical framework used in this case study enables researchers to more completely specify channel members' behavior. By taking into account not only general objectives but also legitimacy concerns of this type of organizations, it is possible to identify reputation and institutional commitment management in the upstream network as two governance mechanisms of equal importance to the mechanisms of vertical integration or management of relationships with suppliers.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests the need for further research into external validity and measurement issues.

Practical implications

The study highlights the necessary governance mechanisms wine merchants have to deploy in their upper professional and supply networks in order to enhance their market performance. Successful positioning strategies seem to be more and more dependent on the wine merchants' ability to acquire a strong position and recognition in its upstream networks: only those who have taken into account the legitimacy issue and have deployed mechanisms to govern it effectively will survive the current internationalisation processes and avoid market decline.

Originality/value

This more nuanced channel approach offers a number of empirical illustrations to support the tri‐dimensional conceptualization of institutional environment suggested by Grewal and Ravi in 2002.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Jeremy Lee Williams

There has been a revolution in the winemaking and marketing of the country wines of southern France in the Languedoc‐Roussillon — the Vins de Pays d'Oc. This revolution…

Abstract

There has been a revolution in the winemaking and marketing of the country wines of southern France in the Languedoc‐Roussillon — the Vins de Pays d'Oc. This revolution has been founded on premium varietal wines and exploited modern techniques of vinification and marketing, which have drawn heavily on the experiences of the so‐called ‘New World.’ These new wines have successfully penetrated export markets, particularly the UK. Such developments, however, have attracted controversy, being criticised for encouraging the production of homogeneous, geographically inert, formulaic wines from well established rather than local grape varieties. However, a number of ventures are now showing increased recognition of local varieties and geographies in their winemaking and it is expected that such developments will continue. Moreover it is argued that the introduction of modern techniques in vinification and marketing, far from having a detrimental effect, have been of great benefit to the region.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Juliet Cox and Larry Bridwell

This paper aims to provide a strategic analysis of how globalization has enabled Australian companies to transform the wine industry.

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2825

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a strategic analysis of how globalization has enabled Australian companies to transform the wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The global wine industry is analyzed from two strategic management perspectives: Michael Porter's positioning concepts and the hypercompetitive framework of Richard D'Aveni with particular emphasis on the success of the Australian Yellow Tail brand.

Findings

The forces of globalization have caused significant changes in a historically stable industry. The success of the Yellow Tail brand demonstrates how a focused strategy with the right product, distribution and marketing can cause significant industry disruptions. Overall, the D'Aveni framework of hypercompetition seems to best describe the impact of Australian wine companies, although the generic strategies of Michael Porter may still be applicable when considering the French industry.

Research limitations/implications

The focus is on using two strategic frameworks; there are others which could have been included. The example of Australian wine companies has been used to illustrate the changes in the overall market, but studying other “new world” wine producers such as Chile or Argentina may also add insight.

Practical implications

The paper provides an example of how the academic frameworks of strategic management can be applied to different industries and shows that dynamic forces of globalization can emerge from any corner of the world and cause dramatic economic change.

Originality/value

This paper will be of interest to those studying the global dimensions of strategic management and its practical implications.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2017

Benoit Lecat, Joelle Brouard and Claude Chapuis

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the specificities of wine forgery today and to show the perspectives offered to the different stakeholders in the wine industry.

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1060

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the specificities of wine forgery today and to show the perspectives offered to the different stakeholders in the wine industry.

Design/methodology/approach

Owing to the technical aspects of this paper, a literature review based on academic papers (history) and articles coming from the professional press, internet websites and public organizations was made.

Findings

It was found that frauds have always existed. Forgers are constantly in search of new ways of counterfeiting wines. Producers have had to adapt to the various forms of counterfeiting, mainly by resorting to modern technology. As the traceability of great wines is becoming crucial, a new type of relationships between producers anxious to offer genuine estate wines and consumers anxious to drink the bottles they ordered has developed. This new constraint became a marketing opportunity for producers.

Research limitations/implications

It was difficult to obtain official data (interviews or surveys) because of the sensitiveness of the topic.

Practical implications

This paper, which offers an inventory of the methods used by forgers to deceive customers, makes both producers and consumers aware of the extent of the problem. The counterfeiting phenomenon is dangerous for producers’ image and the technological changes are a tool allowing producers to protect their wine and reinforce their relationships with consumers.

Originality/value

This paper gives an overview of forgers’ ploys in France. It opens a discussion about perspectives for the different stakeholders while most of the research tends to focus on technical solutions and the analysis of specific affairs which received media coverage.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2012

Nathalie Spielmann and Claire Gélinas‐Chebat

This article seeks to uncover if the definition of terroir is the same between the users (producers, vendors, high and low involvement consumers) of the term in the French

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1564

Abstract

Purpose

This article seeks to uncover if the definition of terroir is the same between the users (producers, vendors, high and low involvement consumers) of the term in the French wine industry. The objective is to uncover if the definition of terroir is homogenous between the user groups.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was distributed to an industry sample and then to a consumer panel, and asked respondents to outline in their own words how they would define a terroir product. Lexical analyses using SATO software were conducted and uncovered word frequency, distances, and contexts.

Findings

The results show that each user group has its own taxonomy of terroir terms and uses an exclusive vocabulary. User group distinctions and commonalities are outlined. Globally it appears that the user groups seem to define terroir based on their level of involvement with wine as well as their role in the wine industry.

Practical implications

French wine marketers can use these results to better understand how types of consumers perceive terroir and consider these perceptions when contemplating using terroir in a product description such as on wine labels or when developing marketing communications.

Originality/value

Prior to this research there were no empirical results regarding how terroir is defined in the marketplace as well as the relationships between the descriptives used to define terroir. This research is a first step in understanding the value of terroir as a marketing attribute as well as the signals it represents for all user groups in the French wine industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Gwyn Campbell and Nathalie Guibert

This introductory paper aims to place the contributions to this special issue within the context of the recent impact of globalisation on the wine industry, characterised…

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7604

Abstract

Purpose

This introductory paper aims to place the contributions to this special issue within the context of the recent impact of globalisation on the wine industry, characterised by rapidly growing and evolving international markets, the expansion of New World wines on international markets, and the response of Old World rivals to New World competition.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the new competitive environment in the wine industry created by globalisation and outlines the way in which the authors of the papers in this special issue have contributed to an understanding of that environment.

Findings

This paper reflects a renewed academic interest in winemaking, one of the most dynamic and rapidly developing agricultural sectors.

Originality/value

The paper hightlights how the authors of the papers in this special issue have contributed to an understanding of this new competitive environment.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 108 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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