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Article

Rene Arseneault, Nicholous M. Deal and Albert J. Mills

The purpose of this paper is to explore the pluralist contours of Canadian management “knowledge” using the discourse “official” bilingualism – the English and French

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the pluralist contours of Canadian management “knowledge” using the discourse “official” bilingualism – the English and French languages – to understand the impact of socio-historical-political differences on the development of management knowledge production.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon an archival collection of management textbooks as historical data, the authors critically explore and analyze the development of Canadian “schools” and management theory. Using narrative analysis and critical hermeneutics, the paper considers the socio-historical-political context of the various “Canadian” scholars that sought to establish a unique business academy distinct but paradoxically akin to the management schools in the USA.

Findings

Mirroring the struggle of Francophones in a dominant English imperative, French management textbooks appeared decades later than English titles. When French texts began to disseminate, it remained in the shadows of American management ideologies.

Research limitations/implications

As only Canadian organizational behavior texts published within the previous 50 years were used as data in this study, it may be incautious to draw broader conclusions. The empirical element of this research relied upon convenience sampling of textbooks.

Practical implications

Management educators weld a considered level of socio-political power that they may or may not knowingly possess, especially in terms of selecting a textbook and other course materials. Regardless of background, management students are somewhat a “tabula rasa;” open to learning new content to make sense of the world. This “open state” places a great deal of responsibility on the professorate in shaping management students’ theoretical understanding of everyday life in organizations. The authors suggest practitioners be reflexive, aware of how textbooks serve as an important vehicle in education that in times past, have promoted or reified mono-cultural agendas.

Originality/value

The research in this paper builds on recent research that considers the role of socio-historical-political context in how management knowledge and theory is performed, as well as contributes to understanding textbooks in how they may shape a pluralist account of Canadian management “knowledge”.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article

Mary Kate Naatus, Katia Passerini, Kevin Pon and Mark Somers

– The purpose of this paper is to compare knowledge of business concepts acquired at the end of undergraduate studies of management in France and the USA.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare knowledge of business concepts acquired at the end of undergraduate studies of management in France and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Mind maps were used to examine what knowledge students retained toward the end of their undergraduate studies in business and management. Data were collected from two groups of students, one in France and one in the USA and they analyzed on computer software.

Findings

The results indicate that the learning process may be influenced not only by the structure and content of the program but also by the environment in which such content is assimilated. This study provides examples of how culture can influence the way we learn and represent core business knowledge.

Research limitations/implications

The research was based on a number of undergraduate students and cannot therefore be generalized to other subjects or other levels of studies at the present time.

Originality/value

The paper moves away from traditional manners of collecting data through questionnaires and surveys in order to study the impact of management education and what students learn at undergraduate level.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 34 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Peter Daly

The purpose of this paper is to position the business apprenticeship model (a work-based learning model where student managers alternate between academic and workplace…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to position the business apprenticeship model (a work-based learning model where student managers alternate between academic and workplace learning) at a political, institutional and student level in order to explain how it fits within the French business education landscape and how it is considered as a viable business model in management education.

Design/methodology/approach

Business apprenticeship is analysed through the prism of Osterwalder and Pigneur’s (2010) Business Model Canvas to evaluate the nine dimensions of the business model: customer segments, value proposition, customer channels, customer relationships, revenue streams, key resources, key activities, key partners and cost structure.

Findings

Two major advantages of the model are identified, namely, the potential for widening participation and affordability and three concerns are outlined: the corporate vision of the apprentice, the recent governmental reforms on funding this model, and the potential synergies between theory and practice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is useful for all those who wish to develop an apprenticeship track within their business schools and for employers who are considering the development of apprenticeship partnerships with business schools.

Originality/value

This paper provides insight into business apprenticeship as a work-based learning model.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

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Article

Kevin Pon and Anne-Laure Duncan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of French medium sized business schools in the Grandes Ecole sector of education and how networks and alliances help…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the state of French medium sized business schools in the Grandes Ecole sector of education and how networks and alliances help business schools survive in an ever-changing and global environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The material for empirical research for this paper was gathered by using a case study method of four small to medium sized provincial Institutions of Management Education in France.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that all of the business schools studied rely on networks and alliances to face globalisation and internationalise their strategy and seems to follow the three typologies of mergers and acquisitions set down by Napier (1989): extension mergers, collaborative mergers and redesign mergers. At present, the networks and alliances are used on a marginal or peripheral way by networking only a part of the institution at one time.

Research limitations/implications

Further research at a later date needs to be carried out in order to observe if the pattern will remain or if there may be networks which will start from the core of the institution since the organisations will in the future have more of an international or global culture.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to demonstrate that medium-sized business schools can compensate their limited resources and compete in the global education market. Alliances and networks appear as key ways in achieving goals of sustainability and survival.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article

Laurent Giraud, Alain Bernard and Laura Trinchera

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the early career values and individual factors of objective career success among graduates from a top-tier French business school.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the early career values and individual factors of objective career success among graduates from a top-tier French business school.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a quantitative analysis of 629 graduates classified in three job markets according to income: the traditional business market, the alternative market and the high-potential business market. The graduation dates span a period of 12 years before the 2008 Recession.

Findings

The findings suggest that membership of each job market is associated with distinct early career values (when choosing/leaving the first job). Moreover, the authors confirm that the presence of a mentor, international experience, job-hopping and gender, all affect objective career success.

Practical implications

The paper discusses implications for business career development and higher business education.

Originality/value

The originality of this study lies in the identification of the individual factors of objective career success among French business graduates and the links between objective career success and early career values.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 24 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Jacques Angot, Hedley Malloch and Birgit Kleymann

The paper aims to show how professional identity is constructed at a very early stage of initial management education. In so doing, it questions the notion of le métier in…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to show how professional identity is constructed at a very early stage of initial management education. In so doing, it questions the notion of le métier in management.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a study of the experiences of six French management apprentices (or apprentis) who participated in a management apprentice programme in 2005. The research methodology is qualitative and illuminates the process of professional identity building. The central question of the study concerns the manager as an individual, an actor, and the link between the individual and his or her métier.

Findings

The findings suggest that from their very first immersion into the real world of corporate employment at junior management level, students construct different types of professional identity which can be shown as a 2×2 matrix whose independent axes are the type of acting displayed by the apprentis; and the degree to which the apprentis enacted their roles. This can be interpreted using the coupling system metaphor. Some of these types of professional identity are born of cynicism and disillusion engendered by their experiences.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on a small number of students drawn from one business school and concentrated in one job function – marketing.

Practical implications

The paper draws attention to the implications of the findings for those in business schools and organisations concerned with the formation of professional identity in young graduates.

Originality/value

The article proposes a new model for the formation of professional identity; and is the first study that deals with the French Apprenti manager programme.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 50 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article

Ingrid Nappi‐Choulet, Franck Missonier‐Piera and Marion Cancel

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of corporate real estate (CRE) ownership on value creation for non‐financial French listed companies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of corporate real estate (CRE) ownership on value creation for non‐financial French listed companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a pool sample composed of SBF 250 companies over the period 1999‐2004, this paper investigates the association between economic value added (EVA) and market value added (MVA) as proxies for the value generated by French listed companies and the proportion of real estate in their asset portfolio.

Findings

The empirical results show that an increase in the proportion of real estate assets (over total assets) is negatively associated with EVA, but only for firms in service industries exhibiting low real estate intensity. The regression on MVA shows a negative association with the increase in the proportion of real estate for firms outside the service industries.

Research limitations/implications

Recent trends show that many large companies have sold a significant portion of their CRE assets. The underlying motives for such behaviour are yet to be examined (at least for the French context). If real estate has any influence, an association should be observable between proxies of value creation and the change in the proportion of real estate assets, owned by a company. The results suggest that sales of CRE assets may be driven by value maximizing behaviour.

Practical implications

In order to maximize the value of their firm, managers should apparently take value creation into consideration in their decisions to invest in or dispose of real estate assets.

Originality/value

The paper suggests that in a French context, CRE disposals may generate value added in certain industries with specific CRE intensity.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

Keywords

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Article

Stephen A.W. Drew

Economic and business restructuring has proceeded at a dizzy pace inCentral Europe since the overthrow of Communist Government andcentralized state planning. The…

Abstract

Economic and business restructuring has proceeded at a dizzy pace in Central Europe since the overthrow of Communist Government and centralized state planning. The development of effective business leadership is essential to the success of joint ventures involving Western firms and local entrepreneurial undertakings. However, many executives in Central Europe are inexperienced and lack basic managerial knowledge. North American and West European business schools have rushed in to fill the demand for Western business knowhow. Presents experiences of executive development in the Czech Republic and a critical review of the challenges which educators face in Central Europe. Suggests that the adaptation of Western models of management is required, and the content and design of programmes should be tailored to the organizational situation. Suggests, for consideration in future programmes, areas such as ethics, business and society and managerial simulations. The difficulties of radical change facing many organizations are not dissimilar from those currently facing Western firms. The potential for mutual experiential learning exists.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article

Emilio Boulianne, Leanne S. Keddie and Maxence Postaire

This study seeks to identify how professional accountants in France are educated in sustainability; we examine the French accounting programs in regard to sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to identify how professional accountants in France are educated in sustainability; we examine the French accounting programs in regard to sustainability accounting education recommendations.

Design/methodology/approach

We analyze a variety of documents to ascertain what comprises the typical accounting education program in France. Additionally, we conduct five interviews of various stakeholders to understand the importance of sustainability accounting and education in the French context.

Findings

We note an interesting paradox in the French context: while the government requires the reporting and auditing of corporate sustainability information, we find that sustainability is not greatly present in the government-funded French accounting education program. We determine that the government’s power in setting the education agenda combined with its budget restrictions and ability to defer responsibility to other parties has resulted in this paradox in the French setting.

Practical implications

This research draws attention to the consequences of society ignoring sustainability education for professional accountants.

Social implications

This paper contributes to the discussion on how to educate responsible professional accountants and the implications for the planet if accountants are not trained in sustainability.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the important domain of sustainability accounting education. We also explore additional implications for the accounting profession and the general public.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article

Alberto Paucar‐Caceres

The purpose of the paper is to determine possible grouping of similar MBA programmes offered by 45 British and French business schools accredited by the Association of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to determine possible grouping of similar MBA programmes offered by 45 British and French business schools accredited by the Association of Master Business Administration (AMBA) as of January 2006.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses the statistical co‐plot method reported in a similar study of leading full time MBA programmes in the USA. The method is used to map/group the schools according to both core and elective units offered by the business schools.

Findings

The paper outlines the features of the six groups of MBA programmes found (Cluster 1: Manchester and Bath; Cluster 2: Warwick, Lancaster and London; Cluster 3: five top French business schools and Cranfield; Cluster 4: two French schools – Grenoble and Audiencia‐Nantes; Cluster 5: two French schools – ENPC‐EAP and IEP; Cluster 6: the remaining UK MBA programmes). The differentiating characteristics of core and option units offered by business schools in each cluster are described and discussed.

Originality/value

The study makes a contribution under the application area of international business education (specifically the design of MBA programmes), as well as in the area of statistical analysis by using co‐plot cluster analysis, an approach not used before when comparing UK and French Business schools to explore aspects of curriculum design.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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