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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2021

Fredrick Simpeh, Emmanuel Bamfo-Agyei and Christopher Amoah

The new normal introduced by COVID-19 has ushered in new safety regulations that are required to be implemented by all organisations, including the construction industry…

Abstract

Purpose

The new normal introduced by COVID-19 has ushered in new safety regulations that are required to be implemented by all organisations, including the construction industry. The implementation of the COVID-19 regulations, like any health and safety regulation, is not without hindrances. Consequently, this study aims to explore factors hindering the implementation of COVID-19 safety regulations at construction sites in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative research method using an open-ended questionnaire as a data collection instrument. The set of questionnaires were distributed by means of purposive and snowball sampling methods. The collected data were analysed by means of the thematic analysis technique.

Findings

It became evident that several factors militate against implementing COVID-19 safety regulations at construction sites. Cost of implementing COVID-19 safety measures, lack of compliance and ignorance were identified as the most hindering factors, whereas superstition, lack of personal protective equipment supply and theft of COVID-19 materials were reported by fewer respondents.

Research limitations/implications

The set of questionnaires were limited to small construction firms who were operating on site within the Central, Western and Greater Accra regions of Ghana during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the findings may be applicable to firms outside these regions because most of the small construction firms in the country share similar characteristics.

Practical implications

The recommendations proffered could help construction organisations devise strategies to overcome the barriers that hamper the implementation of COVID-19 safety regulations on site. Moreover, the findings could inform policymakers on what is required to enforce compliance on site.

Originality/value

COVID 19 is still new, and as a result, the body of knowledge is at the infancy stage. This article contributes to advancing the body of knowledge in the area of COVID-19 implementation challenges on construction sites.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Fredrick Simpeh and Winston Shakantu

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model that can be used as a guide for the provision, adaptation and management of on-campus student accommodation spaces and services.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a model that can be used as a guide for the provision, adaptation and management of on-campus student accommodation spaces and services.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological research strategy was used for the study. Qualitative data were collected by means of focus group discussions (FGDs) and observations. A total of ten FGDs were conducted. The student accommodations were observed to augment the information gathered through the FGDs. The data was analysed thematically.

Findings

The study found that students perceived some spaces and services as essential, whereas others were perceived as nonessential. Spaces including washroom, sleeping space, kitchen, laundry area and dry line, sick bay, computer area and study area, as well as services such as electricity, water, security, fire safety, internet, study furniture, health care, generators, electric fittings, ventilation, maintenance, pest control, refuse collection and cleaning were perceived as the most essential spaces and services required in student accommodations. It also became evident that apart from the spaces and services aforementioned, a student accommodation should also be provided with spaces and services that promote students’ well-being and leisure.

Practical implications

The model can be used as a guide by estate, facility, maintenance and hostel managers to effectively manage on-campus university student accommodation spaces and services. Moreover, the model can assist to ensure that all spaces and services perceived as essential are provided when designing, constructing or upgrading student accommodations.

Originality/value

Although several studies have been conducted on student accommodations, studies that mainly focused on identifying and prioritising the spaces and services required in student accommodations is lacking.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2021

Patricia Omega Kukoyi, Fredrick Simpeh, Oluseyi Julius Adebowale and Justus Ngala Agumba

The novel COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk in construction operations. New systems are, thus, required on construction sites to mitigate the risk and challenges…

Abstract

Purpose

The novel COVID-19 pandemic has increased the risk in construction operations. New systems are, thus, required on construction sites to mitigate the risk and challenges associated with the pandemic. This paper aims to determine construction organisations risk control systems and the challenges of implementing safety measures on construction sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a qualitative research method. A purposive sampling method was used to select study participants, who were administered open-ended questionnaires designed to gather qualitative data. The contents of the data were analysed, presented and reported based on the objectives of the study.

Findings

Some of the construction organisations conducted COVID-19 related risk assessments, whilst a few organisations did not conduct a risk assessment. Inspections to ensure COVID-19 compliance was done by government officials, health organisations and client’s health and safety officers. The construction organisations demonstrated considerable competence in record keeping and some organisations further evolved a follow-up plan for sick workers. The study found that some construction practitioners had misconceptions about the disease, used COVID-19 personal protective equipment incorrectly and lack adequate information about the virus. It is required that construction stakeholders evolve policies and strategies that would promote risk control and foster compliance to COVID-19 safety measures.

Originality/value

COVID-19 is still new, therefore, the body of knowledge is still at the infancy stage. This paper provided insight into the COVID-19 related risk and challenges that may increase the rate of virus infection amongst construction practitioners.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2021

Christopher Amoah, Emmanuel Bamfo-Agyei and Fredrick Simpeh

COVID-19 came as a surprise to the global economy and devastated many sectors worldwide, including the construction sector. Small construction firms are believed to be an…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 came as a surprise to the global economy and devastated many sectors worldwide, including the construction sector. Small construction firms are believed to be an engine of growth in many developing countries, including Ghana; thus, their survival cannot be trivialized. This study explored the impact of the COVID-19 on the businesses of the small confirms in Ghana.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach was adopted for this study. Open-ended interview questions were distributed via email to 45 small construction firms (D3K3 and D4K4) purposefully selected. Thematic contents analysis was used to analyze 30 interview questions received.

Findings

This study has revealed that the COVID-19 has severely affected small construction firms in Ghana. Small construction firms are struggling in their finances; their cash flow/payments for work done are severely affected; they cannot secure contracts and management site efficiently. Their worker's productivity level has dwindled, which has subsequently escalated their project cost and completion time. These effects identified are significantly affecting the survival of these small construction firms.

Research limitations/implications

The study included small construction operating in the Central, Western and Greater Accra regions of Ghana during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the findings may be applicable to construction sites outside these regions.

Practical implications

The implication is the COVID-19 pandemic hugely impacts the small construction firm's business operations. Therefore, they must be mindful of the new norm (COVID-19) and institute strategies to help them overcome the challenges and sustain their businesses.

Originality/value

The study gives insight into the effects of the COVID-19 on the businesses of small construction firms in Ghana and proposes strategies that they must implement to overcome their challenges and sustain their businesses.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Fredrick Simpeh and Mariam Akinlolu

Security, safety, environment and health have become an integral part of facility management (FM). Therefore, FM departments within organisations are required to put…

Abstract

Purpose

Security, safety, environment and health have become an integral part of facility management (FM). Therefore, FM departments within organisations are required to put measures in place to safeguard facility users. This paper thus aims to investigate and compare the safety and security measures that are provided in the student housing of two universities in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method approach was adopted; interview was used to collect qualitative data, whereas a questionnaire was used as an instrument to collect quantitative data. Content analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data, whereas both descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data.

Findings

It became evident that university B had a better provision of safety and security measures in the student housing than university A. The study also found that both universities had some lapses in the safety and security measures provided in the student housing. Measures that were lacking in both universities were weapon detector, closed-circuit television (CCTV), water sprinkler system, burglar bars on the doors, lift for disabled students, disabled toilet facility, traffic light, tags for vehicles, first aid box, accident book and medically trained personnel.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected from only two universities, making it difficult to generalise the findings of the research. For a broader perspective, a study that expands the number of participating universities is recommended.

Practical implications

The facility management and safety department in the universities can use the recommendations to improve on the safety and security measures required in the student housing. Moreover, the recommendations can contribute to the development of policy frameworks for student housing safety.

Originality/value

There is a paucity of studies on student housing safety/security worldwide, and South Africa in particular. With this study, the authors contribute to the body of knowledge in this area of research.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2020

Fredrick Simpeh and Solomon Adisa

The purpose of this paper is to develop a guide for managing the provision of on-campus student housing facilities (SHFs) security and safety measures.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a guide for managing the provision of on-campus student housing facilities (SHFs) security and safety measures.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted a mixed-method approach; the questionnaire was used as an instrument to collect quantitative data, whereas the interview was used to collect qualitative data. Descriptive and inferential statistics and importance-performance analysis models were used to analyse the quantitative data, whereas content analysis was used for the qualitative data.

Findings

This study found that students rated the satisfaction of all the SHFs safety and security measures below the level of importance. Three categories of performance level (i.e. poor, average and good) were determined. It also became evident that most of the measures were performing averagely, quite a number were poorly performing and few were performing well.

Research limitations/implications

Data was collected from only one university; therefore, the findings of the research may not be generalised. A study that expands the number of participating universities is recommended.

Practical implications

The guide developed can be used by the facility and/or hostel managers to ensure appropriate management of SHFs security and safety measures. The guide can also assist to ensure that all the essential safety measures are provided when designing, constructing or upgrading SHFs. It would also aid in the development of policy frameworks for SHFs security and safety.

Originality/value

Although several studies have been conducted on SHFs, studies that mainly focussed on prioritising SHFs security and safety measures are lacking. With this paper, the authors also demonstrate the practicality of the use of the IPA model to aid the process of developing improvement priorities.

Details

Facilities , vol. 39 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Fredrick Simpeh and Solomon Adisa

This paper compares the provision and risk associated with the lack of safety measures in the student accommodations of a university in the Western Cape province, South…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper compares the provision and risk associated with the lack of safety measures in the student accommodations of a university in the Western Cape province, South Africa, with the aim of developing a guide to improve the provision of the safety measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a case study research strategy. A questionnaire was used as an instrument to collect quantitative data, whereas an interview was conducted to collect qualitative data. Both descriptive (mean score) and inferential (paired t-test) statistics were used to analyse the quantitative data, whereas a content analysis was used to analyse the qualitative data.

Findings

Although most of the measures were provided, few critical measures were not adequate or not provided at all. Moreover, the mean scores obtained indicated that there were statistically significant differences between the provision and risk of non-provision of most of the measures. Weapon detector, closed-circuit television (CCTV), water sprinkler system, lift for disabled students, disabled toilet facility, burglar bar on doors, first aid box, medically trained personnel on post and accident logbook were identified as measures requiring urgent attention.

Research limitations/implications

Data were collected only from one university; therefore, the findings of the research study may not be generalised. Thus, a study that can expand the number of participating universities is recommended.

Practical implications

The facilities department and safety unit can use the recommendations provided to improve the safety of the student accommodations. Policymakers could also benefit from the findings of the study.

Originality/value

There is dearth of studies focussing mainly on student accommodation security and safety measures from the infrastructure point of view. Thus, this article contributes to the body of knowledge in this area.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Fredrick Simpeh and Winston Shakantu

The purpose of this paper is to develop a prioritisation framework that can guide the provision and management of on-campus student housing facility (SHF) services of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a prioritisation framework that can guide the provision and management of on-campus student housing facility (SHF) services of southern Ghana Universities.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopted a phenomenological research strategy. Data was collected by means of focus group discussions (FGDs); a total of ten FGDs were conducted. Observations were also done during the site visit to augment the FGDs. The data were analysed thematically.

Findings

The study found that some services are perceived as “extremely important” and “basic” while others are seen as “unimportant” and “indifferent”. Services including; electricity, water, security, internet, cleaning service, maintenance service, generator, ventilation (fan), health service, library service, electric socket, study furniture, refuse collection, pest control and fire extinguisher were perceived by students as “extremely important”. However, not all of these services were perceived as “basic” requirements.

Practical implications

The framework can be used as a guide by facility and hostel managers to effectively prioritise and manage the services required in a university SHF. Moreover, when designing, constructing and adapting student housing facilities, the framework can be used as a guide to ensure that all critical services are provided in the student housing facilities.

Originality/value

Although several studies have been conducted on student housing, studies that specifically focuses on the services required in a SHF and the prioritisation of such services is lacking. This study combines students’ requirements, importance levels of requirements, and classification of requirements to develop a prioritisation system for student housing services.

Details

Facilities , vol. 38 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2021

Oluseyi Adebowale and Fredrick Simpeh

The increase in enrolment into higher education and the inadequate student housing in educational institutions has led to the growth of off-campus private student housing…

Abstract

Purpose

The increase in enrolment into higher education and the inadequate student housing in educational institutions has led to the growth of off-campus private student housing in Nigeria. Studentification as a research area has received attention in most countries in the global North, whereas there is dearth of studies on studentification in Nigeria. Therefore, this paper aims to examine the effects of studentification on the residents of selected Nigerian communities.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted an exploratory research strategy. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to gather qualitative data from respondents, who were landlords and indigenous tenants of the host communities of two tertiary institutions. The data collected were analysed by means of the thematic analysis technique.

Findings

It became evident that studentification has some effects on the communities. Significant positive effects are business patronage and liveliness, while socio-economic-related factors, which include indecent clothing and theft, were noted as the most significant negative factors.

Practical implications

Implementing the outcomes of this study will contribute to promoting societal ethical values and economic prosperity of the communities.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to building the body of knowledge on the effect of studentification in the Nigerian context.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 June 2021

Fredrick Simpeh and Christopher Amoah

COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a new norm of operation and has further presented new health and safety challenges in all sectors, including the construction sector…

Abstract

Purpose

COVID-19 pandemic has ushered in a new norm of operation and has further presented new health and safety challenges in all sectors, including the construction sector. Consequently, several guidelines have been developed and instituted by various countries to prevent the spread of the disease among the citizenry. This paper aims to explore the COVID-19 guidelines incorporated in the health and safety management policies of construction firms in South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was adopted for the study. Data was collected from construction companies by means of an open-ended questionnaire. The open-ended questionnaire was distributed by using the purposive sampling technique. The collected data was analysed with thematic content analysis.

Findings

The findings show that most construction companies have incorporated aspects of COVID-19 guidelines into the site health and safety policies, whereas the majority of the companies had incorporated guidelines such as site access, handling of COVID-19 cases, induction, screening and social distancing; only a few had incorporated guidelines such as compliance, sanitisation, sick leave, wearing of personal protective equipment, audit and risk assessment, lunchtime rules and grouping of workers into the health and safety policies on site.

Research limitations/implications

Data was collected from higher grade firms; therefore, the research findings may not be applied to smaller construction firms. A study that focuses on lower grades is recommended.

Practical implications

Construction companies could use the recommendations provided to improve upon the policies developed/adopted to curb the spread of CVID-19 on-site.

Originality/value

Research on COVID-19 construction site health and safety measures are still being developed. Thus, this study contributes to advancing the body of knowledge in this evolving field.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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