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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Herman Vantrappen and Frederic Wirtz

Companies change their organizations continually. When such a change follows a change in company strategy, employees understand why it happens. However, organization…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies change their organizations continually. When such a change follows a change in company strategy, employees understand why it happens. However, organization changes occur much more frequently than strategy changes. Their seemingly haphazard nature breeds cynicism, while it shouldn’t: organization changes are perfectly normal, usually necessary and often for the better. The reason is that an organization design is never perfect. Designing an organization is a delicate exercise that considers diverging requirements, but at some point, you’ve got to decide, and go for the “least bad” design. The article lays out how to explain why such changes and cycles occur.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on their long advisory experience to propose three premises about organization design. They then describe the implications of these premises for managers who need to make and explain organization design changes.

Findings

Premise 1: There is no one-size-fits-all organization. Implication: Beware of adopting organizational hypes thoughtlessly; tailor the design to the specific situation, possibly on the basis of an “organizational health-check”. 10;Premise 2: There are usually good reasons why an organization is as it is. Implication: Beware of following a slash-and-burn approach; consider a gradual approach as the default, possibly on the basis of causal loop diagrams. 10;Premise 3: Organization is more than “structure”. Implication: Beware of isolated, simple-minded changes; include “processes”, “people”, “technology” and “culture”, as explained by various frameworks.

Practical implications

Alfred Chandler famously wrote that “structure follows strategy”. This article demonstrates that “structure begets structure”. Hence it is important for managers not to bungle an organization design change. To that purpose, they should be clear about the desired time to see the impact of the change and about the risk of change-induced organizational chaos.

Originality/value

The article contributes to good management practice by enabling managers to explain well why an organization change, even in the absence of a strategy change, does make sense. Managers’ ability to explain the benefits of change, and employees’ acceptance thereof, is a mark of organizational maturity.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Robert M. Randall

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 November 2018

Larry Goodson

Abstract

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 46 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

James Shein and Scott Kannry

This case explores the turnaround and corporate renewal of the Chicago Blackhawks professional hockey team, which transformed from one of the worst-run organizations in…

Abstract

This case explores the turnaround and corporate renewal of the Chicago Blackhawks professional hockey team, which transformed from one of the worst-run organizations in all of professional sports in 2007 to one that won the Stanley Cup (the National Hockey League championship trophy) in 2010. W. Rockwell “Rocky” Wirtz was faced with making critical decisions shortly after inheriting the team from his father, who was the individual most associated with the organization's decline. The team faced financial trouble and had narrowly avoided missing payroll; the previous customer relations strategy (which included refusing to televise home games or to conduct effective marketing) had resulted in significantly diminished brand value; and management and player personnel were devoid of effective leadership. At its nadir, the team was named “The Worst Franchise in Professional Sports” by ESPN in 2004. After assuming control, Rocky embarked on an ambitious corporate renewal strategy that included the following components: leadership: install a new management team with clear goals and creative ideas about how to turn around the organization; culture: reward players for accomplishing their goals and establish a performance-based culture; financial: seek new corporate sponsorships and increase ticket prices once the team established a winning record; and brand and marketing: send a clear message that the team was intent upon winning the championship and design a customer-focused marketing strategy.

After analyzing the case, students should be able to: recommend strategic, financial, and operational changes needed to turn around the organization, and identify key leadership qualities that enable execution of a turnaround plan.

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Stéphane Bourliataux-Lajoinie, Frederic Dosquet and Josep Lluís del Olmo Arriaga

This study aims to offer a three-pronged reflection on overtourism in large cities such as Barcelona. The objective is to outline how technology can impact on overtourism…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to offer a three-pronged reflection on overtourism in large cities such as Barcelona. The objective is to outline how technology can impact on overtourism and eventually, how to tackle the problem using technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design is based on secondary data (literature and online reviews) and a case study of Barcelona.

Findings

The most significant aspect is the rapid spread of comments and reviews about attractions and venues. Despite the interest in ICT generalisation, these new technologies have a dark side. Closely linked to fashion trends, some tourist destinations find themselves rapidly overbooked.

Originality/value

Unlike other studies, this paper reveals a dark side of technology and attempts to use technology to mitigate the impacts of overtourism.

Details

Worldwide Hospitality and Tourism Themes, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4217

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Anat Toder-Alon and Frédéric F. Brunel

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how peer-to-peer word-of-mouth (PPWOM) conversations evolve over time because of the dynamic social nature of the community in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how peer-to-peer word-of-mouth (PPWOM) conversations evolve over time because of the dynamic social nature of the community in which they take place.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyzed PPWOM conversations in an online community website for new and expectant mothers. Two data collection phases were undertaken during a four-year period. In phase I, messages were collected for a one-month period from five different bulletin boards (i.e. cross-sectional data) and at two points in time (i.e. semi-longitudinal). In phase II, a full longitudinal study was conducted, and the complete text of all messages of a newly formed bulletin board was captured for a nine-month period. The corpus of messages was examined in line with the basic tools of ethnomethodology and conversation analysis.

Findings

This research developed a typology of PPWOM genres and showed that these genres change over the community lifespan. The findings confirmed that the levels of social cohesiveness and the interaction communicative motives are the main factors that distinguish different PPWOM genres.

Research limitations/implications

This research has offered a new perspective into the study of PPWOM, and hopefully it will serve as a starting point for a broader dialogue regarding the social context in which PPWOM is exchanged.

Originality/value

In contrast to traditional word-of-mouth research, this study demonstrated that PPWOM conversations go much beyond the exchange of functional information, and instead serve numerous social and emotional goals.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Frederic Ponsignon, Francois Durrieu and Tatiana Bouzdine-Chameeva

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experience design phenomenon in the cultural sector. Specifically, it purports to articulate a set of design characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the experience design phenomenon in the cultural sector. Specifically, it purports to articulate a set of design characteristics that support the alignment between an organisation’s design intention (i.e. intended experience) and the actual experience of customers (i.e. realised experience).

Design/methodology/approach

A single case study approach is adopted to explore the phenomenon from both the provider and customer perspectives simultaneously. A range of qualitative data, including 42 interviews with managers and customers as well as voluminous documentary evidence, are collected. Provider and customer data are analysed independently using a rigorous inductive analytical process to generate experience design themes and to assess possible gaps between intended and realised experience.

Findings

The findings reveal the design characteristics of touchpoints and the overall customer journey, which constitute the core experience, as well as the design characteristics of the physical and social environment, which support the realisation of the core experience, in a cultural context.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include difficulties in generalising the findings from a single case and in claiming that the set of design characteristics identified is exhaustive.

Practical implications

The paper makes several recommendations that are useful and relevant for customer experience practitioners in the cultural sector.

Originality/value

The paper’s contribution is to provide novel empirical insights into the four experience design areas of touchpoints, journey, physical elements and social elements in an experience-centric cultural context. On that basis, a conceptual framework for experience design in the cultural context is proposed.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Intelligence and State Surveillance in Modern Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-171-1

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 3 December 2018

Frederic Lemieux

Abstract

Details

Intelligence and State Surveillance in Modern Societies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-171-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

William Baker

The candidates for the post of first librarian of the LondonLibrary are considered and the circumstances involved in the appointmentof John George Cochrane are discussed…

Abstract

The candidates for the post of first librarian of the London Library are considered and the circumstances involved in the appointment of John George Cochrane are discussed. Cochrane′s immediate successors are briefly reviewed, as well as the overall staffing of the Library in the mid‐nineteenth century.

Details

Library Review, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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