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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Fred Seddon, Richard Hazenberg and Simon Denny

The aim of this research project is to reveal participant perceptions of a Social Enterprise Intervention (SEI) programme, run by a social enterprise and designed to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research project is to reveal participant perceptions of a Social Enterprise Intervention (SEI) programme, run by a social enterprise and designed to reintegrate socially excluded individuals into society.

Design/methodology/approach

The research participants were the social entrepreneur, staff at the social enterprise, the SEI programme attendees and a representative from an external referral agency. Participants engaged in semi-structured interviews with a researcher designed to elicit participant perceptions of the programme.

Findings

Results of the analysis of the interviews revealed six emergent themes that were interpreted by the researchers as: “social mission focus”, “heroic social entrepreneur”, “social impact”, “recidivism”, “the programme” and “programme attendees”. Results of the analysis reveal that all research participants reported the programme helped to re-socialise the programme attendees and increased their self-confidence and self-esteem. Participants also believed programme attendees acquired important skills and qualifications in general warehouse activities and forklift truck driving, which would greatly increase their future employability. Programme attendees indicated the “real world” working environment was important to their feelings of success on the programme.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a hybrid SEI programme based upon the “vision” of a “heroic” social entrepreneur. It also identifies the advantages of the “real” working environment in increasing the employability of socially excluded individuals whilst, at the same time, increasing their social skills.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Simon Denny, Richard Hazenberg, Wray Irwin and Fred Seddon

Evaluation of employment skills programmes (ESP) delivered by work integration social enterprises (WISEs) for the benefit of young people not in employment, education or…

Abstract

Purpose

Evaluation of employment skills programmes (ESP) delivered by work integration social enterprises (WISEs) for the benefit of young people not in employment, education or training (NEET) is often undertaken by the programme providers. This method of evaluation often lacks objectivity and academic rigour and tends to focus exclusively on output. The purpose of this paper is to reveal programme outcome benefits for NEET participants after completing a six‐week ESP, delivered by a WISE. The study highlights the participant perspective and adds an objective dimension to programme evaluation through an innovative, inductive evaluation process.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted an intervention method, within a qualitative paradigm, employing semi‐structured interviews conducted pre‐ and post‐participant engagement in the ESP. NEET participants were also asked to complete questionnaires designed to measure general self‐efficacy and attitude to enterprise. The questionnaires were introduced in order to test the suitability of this type of questionnaire with NEET groups in future larger‐scale studies.

Findings

Analysis of the interview data revealed ten overall participant perception themes: “experience”, “self‐confidence”, “the programme”, “perceived barriers” and “maturity” at Time 1 and “experience”, “self‐confidence”, “the programme”, “enterprise” and “future” at Time 2. Outcome benefits are demonstrated through differences in participant perception themes revealed at Time 1 and Time 2. Relationships between participant perception themes and questionnaire constructs are discussed in the context of future larger‐scale evaluations.

Originality/value

Adopting an intervention method employing semi‐structured interviews, allowed the participants to articulate the outcome benefits that were important for them rather than merely providing affirmation of the programme provider's expectations.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2011

Bob Doherty

Abstract

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2014

Bob Doherty

Abstract

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2020

Abdullah Ibrahim Alkraiji

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the utility of information systems (IS) success models in mandatory e-government services, as opposed to the volitional…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically examine the utility of information systems (IS) success models in mandatory e-government services, as opposed to the volitional ones that have been the focus of previous studies. The models include the technology acceptance model (TAM) (1989) and Seddon’s model (1997), which involve three (ease of use, usefulness and citizens satisfaction) and four variables (system quality, information quality, usefulness and citizen satisfaction).

Design/methodology/approach

The models were compared based on a survey conducted on 780 foundation year students of government universities in Saudi Arabia. The Saudi Government has launched a mandatory e-government service geared to assist high school graduates in the university academic admission process. The goodness-of-fit and parsimony of fit indices and the explanatory power were used to compare the two models.

Findings

The structural equation modeling techniques revealed that overall, the two models both exhibited reasonable fit with the collected data, whereas TAM showed the best fit to the sample data and yielded superior goodness-of-fit indices over Seddon’s model. In terms of explanatory power, Seddon’s model predicted 28% (R2 = 0.28) of the variance explained for citizen satisfaction, whereas TAM predicted 21% (R2 = 0.21). All the parsimony of fit indices favored TAM over Seddon’s model.

Research limitations/implications

This study examined the validity of TAM and Seddon’s model, using citizen satisfaction as the dependent variable to compare them. TAM and Seddon’s model were modified to better fit the current research context of mandatory e-government services; thus, the findings may not hold for their original or other voluntary settings. In addition, the focus on a single survey for a certain time in a certain territory of mandatory e-government service may have limited the generalizability of the results to other mandatory contexts. Future research should make use of large, cross-sectional samples in different mandatory contexts to enhance result generalization.

Practical implications

This study’s findings can provide e-government practitioners with deeper perceptions of how to address citizen satisfaction with mandatory e-government services. The results exposed usefulness as the common and major construct, having the strongest influence on citizen satisfaction in both TAM and Seddon’s model; thus, maximizing the benefits of e-government services for citizens is crucial to their success. The causal relationship between information quality and citizen satisfaction was not supported. This supports the perspective that e-government services are currently evolving quickly, becoming more integrated and easier-to-use, generally requiring only a few clicks and less information.

Originality/value

This study has extended the assessment of the validity of IS success models to a mandatory IS usage setting. The comparison study of different IS success models is crucial as it acts as a guide for researchers to determine the trade-off between the models used to conduct research on a particular context. The study concludes that TAM is the most parsimonious and universal model for the study of user satisfaction in mandatory contexts. The findings will provide e-government practitioners with insights into IS success measures suited to enhance the effectiveness of newly and future mandated e-government services.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Bob Doherty

The purpose of this paper is to review the development and impact of the Social Enterprise Journal (SEJ) from its inception in 2005 until present day.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the development and impact of the Social Enterprise Journal (SEJ) from its inception in 2005 until present day.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the thematic content of SEJ and its impact data from 2005 until 2017.

Findings

SEJ has broken new ground in the study of social enterprise (SE). It was the first journal back in 2005 to commence the exploration of this field and since has been the first to publish works on defining SE, their performance management, critical perspectives plus international differences. The paper shows that in the early years, SEJ was dominated by conceptual work aiming to understand SE plus their governance and performance management, which was mainly based on UK descriptive case studies and uncritical. By 2010, SEJ became established internationally with various issues being 100 per cent dominated by international aspects of SE. Recent more critical work has also enabled a process of “myth busting” in the SE field. This paper also shows the growth of SEJ in downloads and citations.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates the important role SEJ has played in both improving practice and informing policy.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to review the development and impact of SEJ.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Benjamin T. Hazen, Joseph Huscroft, Dianne J. Hall, Fred K. Weigel and Joe B. Hanna

Information systems (IS) play a substantial role in managing reverse logistics (RL) processes. However, the RL literature rarely takes a holistic approach to examining the…

Abstract

Purpose

Information systems (IS) play a substantial role in managing reverse logistics (RL) processes. However, the RL literature rarely takes a holistic approach to examining the “success” of IS employment. Drawing on the rich literature base from the IS field, the authors explore IS Success theory in the context of RL. Considering Diffusion of Innovation theory, the authors also examine the effect of motivation on IS utilization. In doing so, the authors provide scholars and practitioners with insight into the factors affecting the success of a RL IS. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based upon DeLone and McLean's IS Success theory, the authors develop the model to consider information quality, IS utilization, and RL cost effectiveness (as a proxy for net benefits). The authors disaggregate RL into two processes and thus consider the model from two perspectives: the process of receiving returns from customers (inbound) and the process of returning products to suppliers (outbound). The authors survey 136 RL professionals and employ partial least squares modeling for data analysis.

Findings

For both inbound and outbound path models, information quality is significantly and positively related to IS utilization; in turn, IS utilization is a significant predictor of net benefits. For inbound, RL goals provide significant motivation to drive IS utilization. For outbound, RL challenges provide significant motivation for IS utilization.

Originality/value

The authors bring IS Success theory into the context of RL. Additionally, by investigating the topic from both inbound and outbound perspectives, the findings suggest differences between inbound and outbound RL processes.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 October 2009

Joshua M. Davis, Lorraine S. Lee and Mun Y. Yi

Past research recognizes the important influence of individual beliefs on technology acceptance and use. This line of research has also identified a variety of factors…

Abstract

Past research recognizes the important influence of individual beliefs on technology acceptance and use. This line of research has also identified a variety of factors that drive the formation of these beliefs. One category of variables that has received less attention in this research stream consists of individual preferences, in particular time‐use preferences. In the current study we address the gap in the technology acceptance literature by introducing and empirically testing a new construct labeled computer polychronicity, which captures individuals’ time‐use preferences regarding information technology. A new measure of computer polychronicity is developed and subsequently tested using partial least squares estimation. Computer polychronicity is then theorized as a key driver of perceived usefulness, linking computer anxiety and computer playfulness to perceived usefulness. Overall, the results of model testing support the notion that preferences play an important role in the formation of technology‐related beliefs.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2009

Kevan Penter, Graham Pervan and John Wreford

The purpose of this paper is to contribute towards development of a management framework for offshore business process outsourcing (BPO).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute towards development of a management framework for offshore business process outsourcing (BPO).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper utilises longitudinal case studies to identify success factors in managing offshore BPO via the captive model (i.e. wholly‐owned subsidiary).

Findings

Success in offshore BPO is based on a combination of cost savings, technical service quality and strategic issues, is specific to business context and will change over time. Choice of engagement model (e.g. captive operation or arms‐length contracting) is an important success factor. Advantages of captive centers arise from higher levels of relationship quality, trust and collaboration effectiveness.

Research limitations/implications

This paper focuses on two global companies in two industry sectors (airlines and telecommunications), and both have adopted one particular BPO model (i.e. captive operation).

Originality/value

The paper contributes to scarce literature on offshore captive BPO operations, the most common but also least researched engagement model. The findings have practical implications for managers designing offshore BPO strategy.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1948

Armstrong Siddeley Motors Ltd., of Coventry, announce that Mr W. F. Saxton, chief engineer, has been appointed a director of the Company.

Abstract

Armstrong Siddeley Motors Ltd., of Coventry, announce that Mr W. F. Saxton, chief engineer, has been appointed a director of the Company.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 20 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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